CEO of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters joins Saint Michael’s Board of Trustees

first_imgCEO of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters joins Saint Michael’s Board of TrusteesLawrence J. Blanford, president and chief executive officer of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Waterbury, Vt., has joined the Saint Michael’s College board of trustees and attended meetings on campus Dec. 5 and 6.”I felt very privileged to be asked to join the Saint Michael’s board,” Blanford said, explaining that he had become familiar with the college by attending Mass in the college’s Chapel of Saint Michael the Archangel since moving to Vermont. Blanford and his family came to the area 18 months ago.”We’ve been thrilled with the masses at Saint Michael’s, he said. “The Edmundite priests are wonderful speakers and it’s a beautiful mass with five, six or even seven priestsI look forward to it every week.”Mr. Blanford came to know SMC President Jack Neuhauser at Mass and through that relationship was invited to join the college’s board. Having just finished a term on the board of Clark-Atlanta University, he had the time and “was thrilled to become a part of Saint Michael’s College.”Mr. Blanford has a history of leading companies. Prior to joining Green Mountain Coffee Roasters in 2007, he was CEO of Royal Group Technologies, Toronto, Canada, from 2005 to 2006; president and CEO of Philips Consumer Electronics, Atlanta, from 2001 to 2003; president of Maytag Appliances, Newton, Iowa, 1998 to 2000; and had previously held management positions with Johns Manville, Denver; PPG Industries, Pittsburgh; and Proctor & Gamble, Cincinnati. He earned a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and a master’s in business administration from Xavier University in Cincinnati.Mr. Blanford and his wife Lynn, residents of South Burlington, Vt., have two children, Amanda, a sophomore in college in Ohio, and John a student at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington.Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 368 Colleges. A liberal arts, residential, Catholic college, Saint Michael’s is located just outside of Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns, and less than two hours from Montreal. As one of only 270 institutions nationwide with a prestigious Phi Beta Kappa chapter on campus, Saint Michael’s has 2,000 full-time undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 200 international students.In recent years Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, Fulbright, National Science Foundation and other grants, and Saint Michael’s professors have been named Vermont Professor of the Year in four of the last eight years. The college is currently listed as one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report rankings.-30-last_img read more

State Announces More Than $182,000 in Historic Preservation Grants

first_imgThe state today announced more than $182,000 in 15 matching grants to projects for the restoration and preservation of historic buildings across Vermont, including two in the town of Windsor, the birthplace of Vermont.Standing in front of the historic Stephen Jacob House, whose owner, Historic Windsor Inc., received a $7,690 grant to install a new roof to protect the building, Deputy Secretary of Commerce and Community Development Jim Saudade congratulated the grant recipients.“These are difficult times, but we are continuing this administration’s commitment to historic preservation,” Saudade said. “Preserving our past is an important part of keeping Vermont a special place not only for our residents, but for the visitors who come and help support our tourism economy.”In addition, the American Precision Museum in Windsor received $8,000 that will be used to help stabilize and repair masonry at the historic brick Robbins & Lawrence Armory building, an important part of the early machine tool industry in Vermont and the nation.The grant program, administered by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation, provides owners of historic buildings with matching funding of up to $15,000 for a variety of capital repairs.Saudade said the grant program is “an investment that helps leverage additional funding sources.”“By partnering with state government, the owners of these buildings can invest in saving them, both for the current enjoyment of residents and visitors, and for future generations of Vermonters,” he said.Judy Hayward, executive director of Historic Windsor Inc., agreed. She noted that her organization had only purchased the Stephen Jacob House, which is historically significant for a court case that upheld Vermont’s constitutional ban on slavery, with the help of a donation last year.“This is an important grant because it is our initial funding and now we can begin the process of fundraising for the restoration,” Hayward said. “It is a lot easier to make that ask when someone has agreed to go first.”Buildings must be on the National Register of Historic Places or eligible for listing, and grant requests are reviewed by the Vermont Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, a group of volunteers appointed by the Governor whose members include experts in archeology, history, and architecture.In making decisions on funding, the Council prioritizes projects based on several criteria, including those most in critical need of repair.“We’re just exceeding grateful to the Division for this grant,” said Cher Laston, a representative of the Washington Unitarian Universalist Church, which received $8,150 to help pay for the installation of a new standing-seam metal roof on the historic church.“We are a tiny congregation, there are 15 active members,” she said. “This is the piece that will ensure our building still stands, so we can continue to do the good work that’s been part of its 158 years of history.”For more information, visit the Division for Historic Preservation site at: www.historicvermont.org(link is external)last_img read more

Vermont Public Television receives 2010 EDGE Award

first_imgThe Association of Public Television Stations (APTS) will recognize Vermont Public Television with a 2010 EDGE Award to for demonstrating the great potential of digital television. The EDGE Awards are presented annually to public television stations that use digital technology, groundbreaking partnerships, and educational technologies to deliver innovative services to their communities.“This year our EDGE Award recipients have a common theme—they use their broadcast and other resources to draw upon the energy and engagement around some of the most pressing issues affecting our country—jobs, education and health care,” said Larry Sidman, President and CEO of APTS. “These projects show that stations are moving beyond traditional broadcast and are engaging their communities in new and innovative ways. Audiences are reached through over-the-air, online, and on-the-ground partnerships, impacting their communities in ways that really set them apart.”Sidman said: “Vermont Public Television teamed up with the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Vermont Law School and the Vermont office of the National Alliance on Mental Illness to carry out a multi-faceted, multi-platform, month-long community engagement campaign that brought together national and local television broadcast components, in tandem with Web-based and community forums to create open discussion about the challenges, solutions and impact of mental illness on Vermont communities.”“This award is especially meaningful, because it recognizes the importance of all three platforms of the project—over-the-air, online and on-the-ground—in raising awareness of and decreasing the stigma attached to mental illness,” said project head Elizabeth Ottinger, Director of Community Outreach at Vermont Public Television.Specifically, the October 2009 campaign augmented the national broadcast of the Fred Friendly Seminar Minds on the Edge: Facing Mental Illness with a day-long legislative event at the Vermont Law School for legislators, and five town hall screenings that brought together legislators and community leaders to form action plans to advance various strategies to promote a greater awareness and understanding of mental illness in Vermont. Oliver Goodenough, professor at Vermont Law School and a Co-Director of the MacArthur Education and Outreach Program, expressed gratitude for the EDGE Award to the Minds on the Edge project. “Mental health issues are at the heart of many of our most difficult challenges in law,” he said. “We were pleased to be able to be a part of this important initiative and to help our legislature grapple with these thorny problems.”“Vermont Public Television’s month-long campaign has had an exceptional impact across the state, but it also has had a profound impact outside the state,” said Richard Kilberg, President of Fred Friendly Seminars. “We have presented Minds on the Edge to mental health professionals, citizen groups and policymakers at conferences across the country throughout this past fall and winter, and we have repeatedly held up Vermont as the model of how to use a public media project to move public dialogue. The story of their success has inspired stakeholders in numerous other states to bring key constituencies together around this public media program and work together to transform a badly broken mental health system.”“We are proud of the role Dr. Thomas Simpatico, our Director of Public Psychiatry, played in helping educate the public about mental health and the legal system in both the national Minds on the Edge program, as well as in Vermont Public Television’s statewide town meetings and “Public Square” program,” said Frederick C. Morin III, M.D., Dean of the University of Vermont College of Medicine. “Dr. Simpatico has been an advocate in our state to bring attention to this issue, facilitating dialogue with all stakeholders to ensure patients and their families can navigate the system to get the care they need.”Connie Stabler, President of the Board, National Alliance on Mental Illness-VT, said, “NAMI-VT is honored to have partnered with Vermont Public Television as a participant in the Minds on the Edge Project. Following the public screenings, community leaders, legislators and others joined families, friends and individuals living with mental illness in town-hall style meetings around the state for continued dialogue on improving treatment options. In our state where one in five people are affected by serious mental illness, this program provided a public service in educating the public and reducing the stigma surrounding mental illness.”In 1980, America’s public television stations created the Association of Public Television Stations (APTS) as their premier advocate. For the past thirty years, APTS has been the voice of the public television station community – offering member stations and future leaders of public television unparalleled opportunities for impact. Find out more at www.apts.org(link is external).Source: WASHINGTON— February 23, 2010 — APTS# # #last_img read more

Vermont fall colors close to peak in higher elevations and Northeast Kingdom

first_imgFoliage is nearing peak color in the Northeast Kingdom and in higher elevations across the state.Vibrant foliage will continue to develop around Vermont, and most areas of the state will be displaying multiple stages of colorful foliage throughout the week. Foliage is close to peak color in the Northeast Kingdom and in higher elevations, including sections of the Green Mountains. Look for bright color between Jay Peak and St. Johnsbury, Stowe and Pittsfield, and Killington and Wilmington.‘Expect brilliant color in most locations this weekend, with peak color at the highest elevations,’ said Orange County Forester David Paganelli. ‘The lower elevations and southern areas should be peaking during the middle or end of next week.’The foliage progression will continue to unfold around Vermont over the next several days.‘There has been a considerable increase in fall color in southwestern Vermont over the last week and the area is building toward peak,’ said forester Mike White of Dorset. ‘Reds and oranges are particularly common now and most trees are showing at least some fall color, providing dramatic views that can be seen anywhere in the region. As the area approaches peak color, the views only get better by the day.’Best Bets: In northern Vermont, try Route 114 between Lyndonville and Norton, Route 105 from North Troy to East Charleston, Route 5A from West Burke to Westmore, and Route 111 between Derby Center and Island Pond.Elsewhere in the state, Interstate 89 from Northfield to Bolton offers beautiful views of orange, red and yellow foliage along the hillsides. Colorful foliage can also be found on Route 108 between Stowe and Cambridge, Route 100 between Warren and Stowe, and Route 12 between Montpelier and Elmore.Mountain gap roads offer quality foliage viewing as well. Try Route 73 between Rochester and Brandon, Route 125 between Middlebury and Hancock, and Route 17 between Waitsfield and Starksboro.Look for bright color on Route 100 between Pittsfield and Granville, Route 12 between Woodstock and Bethel, Route 106 between Springfield and Woodstock, and Route 5 along the Connecticut River. Also suggested are Route 140 between Wallingford and Mount Holly, Route 103 between Cuttingsville and Proctorsville, and Route 4 between Killington and Quechee.In southern Vermont, suggested drives include Route 11 between Peru and Chester, Route 100 between Jacksonville and Weston, Route 7 between Wallingford and Manchester, Route 30 between Winhall and Newfane, and Route 9 between Bennington and Wilmington.In general, higher elevations will offer the most panoramic views of emerging color across the valleys, and many low-lying marsh areas will offer some of the most vivid and varied fall color.Source: Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing. 9.28.2010The Vermont Hospitality Council advises making advance reservations because the most popular lodgings may fill early on busy weekends during the foliage season. Some innkeepers may require a minimum two-night stay, especially on busy weekends. Vermont tourism officials encourage visitors to take advantage of midweek specials during the foliage season as part of the statewide ‘Midweek Peek’ promotion. Deals range from discounted lodging to free Vermont products. For details, visit www.VermontVacation.com/midweek(link is external).last_img read more

BP: Record Drop in Global Coal Consumption in 2015

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Yukako Ono for the Financial Times:Global coal consumption dropped 1.8 per cent in 2015, its largest fall on record, according to BP, as demand increasingly shifts to greener fuels. Coal was the only fuel that lost global market share in the power market although it remained the second largest with 29.2 per cent, the lowest share since 2005.The net decline in coal consumption was due to economic growth slowdowns in the US and China where production fell too, BP said.BP said in its statistical review released today that the shift is helping carbon emission reduction:Sluggish demand growth together with the shift in the energy mix away from coal meant that the growth in carbon emissions from energy consumption stalled in 2015. This encouraging development represented the slowest growth in emissions in nearly a quarter of a century (aside from immediately following the financial crisis).Carbon emissions increased by just 0.1 per cent in 2015, BP noted.Full article: Global coal demand saw record fall last year — BP BP: Record Drop in Global Coal Consumption in 2015last_img read more

Groups Seek Federal Inquiry Into Utah-Oakland Coal-Export Subsidy

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From KSL News (Salt Lake City):Environmental groups and other organizations sent a letter Monday asking U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and other high-ranking federal officials to investigate a $53 million investment in a proposed coal shipping terminal in Oakland, California.The letter was written on behalf of the Center for Biological Diversity, Living Rivers and Colorado Riverkeeper, Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, Earthjustice, Alliance for a Better Utah, HEAL Utah, Sierra Club and Grand Canyon Trust. A joint statement released by the organizations Monday says the 19-page letter brings attention to “potential legal and ethical violations” of the investment.“The contents of this letter require an external review by several oversight bodies. … The economic, fiscal, financial, environmental, governance, ethical and political red flags raised by the state of Utah’s actions are too numerous to ignore,” Tom Sanzillo, an executive with the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a research organization in favor of reducing coal dependence, said in a statement.The investment, passed by the Utah Legislature earlier this year, is slated to grant Carbon, Emery, Sanpete and Sevier counties 49 percent access in the as-yet unbuilt coal terminal. Proponents of the measure say it will help increase short-term coal exports to developing countries, a much-needed boon for the struggling industry.The investment is set to be facilitated by a three-way money transfer involving the state’s specially designated community impact fund, which according to its website “provides loans or grants to state agencies and subdivisions of the state that are socially or economically impacted by mineral resource development on federal lands.” The first stage of the transfer is to begin July 1.Keith Heaton, chairman of the fund’s board, has said the swapping of funds for the project is not considered unusual compared with other projects statewide, particularly transportation projects.However, opponents are also criticizing the community impact fund board, in addition to the state Legislature, and calling for an audit of the deal. Among other accusations, the letter issued Monday says the investment is tied to heavy political conflict of interest, was designed as a brazen a way around environmental and other regulations of the federal Mineral Leasing Act, and is environmentally harmful to residents close to the proposed terminal.John Weisheit, co-founder of the environmental group Living Rivers and Colorado Riverkeeper, said in a statement that the Community Impact Fund Board is complicit in an unscrupulous deal.“The Utah state Legislature and the community impact board are laundering public money through the state transportation fund to provide financial assistance to energy corporations, and not to communities where it truly belongs,” Weisheit said.The letter was also addressed to Mary Kendall, deputy inspector general for the U.S. Department of the Interior, and Gregory Gould, director of the federal Office of Natural Resources Revenue. The letter also indicated copies were distributed to Gov. Gary Herbert and John Huber, U.S. district attorney for Utah.Groups write US Attorney General asking for investigation of coal shipping terminal deal Groups Seek Federal Inquiry Into Utah-Oakland Coal-Export Subsidylast_img read more

Contura Sale of 2 Wyoming Mines Unlikely to Ease Powder River Basin’s Low-Price Problem

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享SNL:Coal prices in the Powder River Basin are low, and the recent sale of Contura Energy Inc.’s two mines in the region is unlikely to change that, according to analysts.Seaport Global Securities LLC analysts Mark Levin and Nathan Martin estimated in a Dec. 18 note that about 93 million tons of PRB coal had yet to be priced at the end of the third quarter — about 26% of total production in the region.“We think this is one major reason why PRB production will likely come in lower than flat in 2018,” they said. “Moreover, with so much coal yet to be priced, we are beginning to believe that absent a big move in natural gas prices and/or a very cold rest of December through February, PRB producers will put out 2018 volume guidance in late January/early February that is well below flat YOY.”The analysts called Contura’s decision to sell its Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines to Blackjewel LLC “a good one, maybe even a great one,” noting the move reduces Contura’s balance sheet asset retirement obligation from $200 million to $83 million, frees up $25 million in unrestricted cash, create significant income tax deductions, provides $50 million in royalty payments and reduces capital expenditures by $10 million to $12 million.However, the move will not likely help prices in the PRB.More: Western coal faces declining output, stagnant pricing despite Contura mine sale Contura Sale of 2 Wyoming Mines Unlikely to Ease Powder River Basin’s Low-Price Problemlast_img read more

Global decline in natural gas turbine demand hits Siemens

first_imgGlobal decline in natural gas turbine demand hits Siemens FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:German engineering firm Siemens plans to dismiss about 200 workers at a gas turbines parts and components service center in Houston, Texas, next year due to weaker global demand, a company spokesman said on Tuesday.The Texas operation will close between late 2019 and 2020, according to the spokesman, who called the decision “difficult.”In a letter to the Texas Workforce Commission, Siemens also pointed to overcapacity within its network.Siemens said in September that it would cut 2,900 jobs in Germany to boost the competitiveness of its Power and Gas and Process Industries divisions.Along with turbine competitors General Electric and Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Siemens has faced oversupply and declining sales as demand for gas turbines has plunged.More: Siemens to shut Texas turbines service facility, dismiss workerslast_img read more

Australia rooftop solar tops 8GW mark

first_imgAustralia rooftop solar tops 8GW mark FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The boom is small-scale rooftop solar installations has continued into 2019, with total installs for the first month of the year reaching 159.4MW – a record for the month that is typically affected by the summer holiday season.The latest data from industry statistician Sunwiz shows a 49 per cent jump on the same month last year, and Victoria posting a record for any month of any year – 41MW – beating usual leaders Queensland and NSW to become the strongest market in the country.In fact, it was the first time Victoria has taken the market lead since July 2008, when it installed the grand total of 448kW!South Australia, meanwhile, added 15MW in January and broke through the 1GW aggregate mark during the month, joining Queensland (2.4GW), NSW (1.87GW), Victoria (1.6GW) and Western Australia (1.07GW). South Australia, however, still leads the country in terms of penetration of solar on dwellings (32 per cent).All told, there is now 8.2GW of small-scale rooftop solar in Australia after the record-breaking year in 2018 when nearly 1.6GW was installed. This does not include larger rooftop solar installations (100kW and above), nor the rapidly growing number of large scale, ground mounted solar farms.Another interesting aspect of the January data is that the average system size rose to 7.7kW, a reflection of not just the larger systems being put on households, but also the growing uptake from small business (usually 30kW to 100kW systems).The rooftop solar boom is likely to continue well into 2019 and beyond. The Victoria boost is helped by the Labor government’s election promise to offer state-based rebates that aims to add another 650,000 homes over the next decade (twice its current numbers), or some 2.6GW of new rooftop solar.More: Small-scale rooftop solar installs reach record 159MW in Januarylast_img read more

China intends to cut all greenhouse gas emissions by 2060

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:China’s pledge to be carbon neutral by 2060 includes all greenhouses gases, not just carbon dioxide, according to one of the country’s top climate researchers.He Jiankun, who chairs the academic committee at the Institute of Climate Change and Sustainable Development at Tsinghua University, made the clarification at a conference on Monday outlining China’s road map to reaching its goal.When President Xi Jinping told the United Nations about China’s new target last month, he didn’t specify if China would target just carbon dioxide — the most prevalent greenhouse gas — or others that also contribute to global warming such as methane, ozone and nitrous oxide. He also didn’t detail how China planned to achieve the target, though the government is expected to lay out some of those measures in its upcoming five-year plan for 2021 to 2025.In line with the target, China should announce more ambitious contributions to the Paris climate accord including reducing its carbon intensity by more than 65% from 2005 levels and aiming for a higher share of non-fossil fuel energy sources by 2030, He said.However, researchers at the conference laid out scenarios that showed even that plan wouldn’t put China on the path to keeping global warming within 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial levels, so China would have to scale up targets even more after 2030.More: China Aims to Cut All Greenhouses Gases by 2060, Researcher Says China intends to cut all greenhouse gas emissions by 2060last_img read more