No euphemisms for school’s protectors

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionStop calling security people at schools “school resource officers.” Start calling them cops, law enforcement, security guards.Forget the touchy-feely job titles for people who are meant to protect us.Touchy-feely gets kids killed.Edmond DayRotterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:Car hits garage in Rotterdam Sunday morning; Garage, car burnEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Stockley Park site offered at benchmark rent

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Returning to old Holborn?

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Support act

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McGrath takes REIT portfolio to £1bn

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Tram to the slaughter

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Yorkshire regeneration company goes independent

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Foreign Ministry issues South Korea travel advisory amid COVID-19 fears

first_imgIndonesia’s Foreign Ministry has issued a travel advisory for South Korea on its official website, safetravel.id, amid concerns over the novel coronavirus outbreak. The ministry has emphasized avoiding travel to Daegu and Gyeongsang Bukdo, the two regions with the highest number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in South Korea. The South Korean government has declared them “Special Care Zones”. “Considering the outbreak of COVID-19 in South Korea, we urge those of you who are and/or will be traveling to South Korea to increase caution and not to travel specifically to the Daegu and Gyeongsang Bukdo regions,” declared the travel advisory, which was posted on Sunday. Other countries, including the United States, have also issued travel advisories for South Korea.The United States issued a level 2 travel advisory for South Korea on Saturday. Visitors were asked to “exercise increased caution”, according to the travel.state.gov website, but the US government has yet to issue a “do not travel” advisory. “Many cases of COVID-19 have been associated with travel to or from mainland China or close contact with a travel-related case, but sustained community spread has been reported in South Korea. Sustained community spread means that people in South Korea have been infected with the virus, but how or where they became infected is not known, and the spread is ongoing,” the advisory says. As of Sunday, 13 countries have banned or restricted entry of South Koreans, based on the world.kbs.co.kr report. (ydp) Topics : “We also urge you to always have increased awareness, maintain physical and psychological stamina, wear masks while doing outdoor activities, wash your hands with soap regularly, eat well-cooked meat, reduce interaction in public and continue to monitor information conveyed by the Indonesian Embassy in Seoul and by local authorities.” The advisory added that those experiencing problems in South Korea could contact the Indonesian Embassy’s hotline at +821053942546.According to data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC), there was a drastic increase in the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in South Korea between Feb. 19 and Feb 23. As of Feb. 23, 602 COVID-19 cases have been confirmed in South Korea. Five people have died, 18 have recovered and 579 are being treated in hospitals. last_img read more

Indonesian humanitarian NGO denies allegation of funding New Delhi riots

first_imgIndonesian humanitarian organization Aksi Cepat Tanggap (ACT) has denied reports alleging it of sponsoring the recent deadly sectarian riots in the Indian capital of New Delhi surrounding the controversial citizenship law.Indian media company indiatvnews.com reported on Thursday that the ACT had funded the violent riots. “It was said that the Indonesian NGO ACT tried to send Rs 25 lakh [US$33,802] to fund rioters through a Delhi-based organization. Reports also claim ACT is a highly radicalized Muslim organization. It provides money in the name of assistance to many Muslim countries,” as written by indiatvnews.com.The report also said the ACT had links to Hafiz Saeed, a firebrand cleric who has been declared  a global terrorist by the United Stated and United Nations. It also alleged that the ACT had been involved in riots in Bangladesh and the establishment of Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh.ACT supervisory council member Syuhelmaidi Syukur denied the allegations in a statement on Friday: “As a humanitarian organization, we always maintain an independent stance upon implementing our programs. Our objective is to give humanitarian aid since it is our duty.”Regarding victims of the deadly riots in New Delhi, Syuhelmaidi said the organization had provided humanitarian aid to India since 2017. During the recent conflict, he claimed that the  ACT had only delivered emergency supplies, such as clothing, food, water, medicine and financial aid. Read also: Bukalapak denies allegations of supporting ISAmong the donations were hundreds of food packages and monetary aid for victims or families of New Delhi riot victims.“Our monetary aid recipients consist of victims whose houses have been damaged, widows who lost their children and people who lost their source of income due to the riots,” said Syuhelmaidi. The ACT, he went on to say, had reported its program’s implementation through various media, including social and mass media. The Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) had also awarded it the highest audit grade of “unqualified opinion” for 14 years straight.Sporadic violence hit parts of the Indian capital of New Delhi as gangs roamed streets littered with the debris of days of sectarian riots that left more than 30 people dead, AFP reported.The unrest is the latest bout of violence over Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s controversial citizenship law, which says that Muslim immigrants from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan are not eligible for citizenship, triggering months of demonstrations that turned deadly in December.Topics :last_img read more

Friends, foes see opening in helping virus-hit US

first_imgThe United States has long hailed its aid overseas as a sign of good intentions, but friends and foes alike are seeing opportunities of their own by helping the global power ravaged by the coronavirus.Turkey, looking to end a rough spell with its NATO ally, and Egypt, whose autocratic leader counts on support from President Donald Trump, both sent military jets full of supplies in the past two weeks, while Taiwan, reliant on Washington for its defense and praised for its effective coronavirus response, has sent millions of masks.More controversially, China and Russia — considered top global rivals by Washington — have both sent medical goods to the United States, whose COVID-19 death toll is by far the highest in the world at more than 66,000. Read also: Chinese billionaire Jack Ma offers US virus test kits, masksWelcoming aid, mostlyRecent history is full of disaster-hit nations whose prideful governments have refused help, but the United States has said it welcomes international cooperation against the virus.”We appreciate the generosity and support from around the world,” a State Department spokesperson said.Other assistance has included testing kits from the United Arab Emirates and dispatches of medical teams from US allies, notably Poland.The US government has not directly taken aid from China, with Trump eager to blame Beijing over the pandemic amid criticism around his own performance.But China has channeled assistance to US states or through private donations.Jack Ma, China’s richest person, in March announced a donation of 500,000 test kits, while New York Governor Andrew Cuomo thanked Ma and other Chinese businesspeople — as well as Beijing’s consulate — for sending 1,000 ventilators.More recently, Chinese provinces donated supplies to the states of Maryland and Utah, with photo-ops showing local US officials holding signs that salute friendship.Russia gave prominent coverage when it sent a military plane of masks, ventilators and other supplies to New York.Trump, who has sought closer ties with President Vladimir Putin, called the gesture “very nice,” although the State Department insisted the goods were purchased, not donated.Virus infections have since jumped inside Russia, and some social media users in both Egypt and Turkey have questioned whether their governments were really in a position to help others.Turkey has sent aid to some 55 countries. Its president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has been hoping to defuse tensions with the United States, especially with Congress over Turkey’s purchase of an air defense system from Russia.The aid shipment marks part of an effort to reach out broadly to the United States after Erdogan “put all its eggs in Trump’s basket,” said Gonul Tol, director of the Turkey program at the Middle East Institute.”I’m sure there is an understanding in Ankara that this could be Trump’s final year,” Tol said, while adding: “Turkey’s problems with the US are too deep to be resolved by this PR campaign.”Read also: US allows emergency use of the drug remdesivir for COVID-19 treatmentLasting damage to US?The last time the United States received such wide assistance was after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans in 2005.The then administration of George W. Bush also decided largely to accept all aid regardless of politics, although it refused an offer of doctors from Cuba.Cull, the scholar of public diplomacy, said it was striking how little of Washington’s own COVID-19 assistance gets noticed by Americans, who are more likely to oppose exporting aid at a time of need.The State Department says the US government has committed $775 million in overseas pandemic assistance.But Trump has also vowed to freeze funding for the World Health Organization, which is at the frontlines of the crisis and receives more than $400 million in US money each year, for alleged bias toward China.Cull expected that Trump’s “America First” approach, coupled with scenes of COVID-19 devastation within the country, would bring lasting damage to the US reputation.”It’s like a country with a terrible navy having to fight a naval war. Everybody knows that, for all the wonderful things in the United States, health care is a problem.”Many people may still admire US products or universities, but “they are certainly not going to admire the American government in the way they have historically.”Topics : Nicholas Cull, a professor at the University of Southern California who studies international reputation, said that gifts were often more about donors’ domestic audiences as leaders try to show that they are “winning the respect and admiration of the world”.Cull said the most successful gifts come when a nation has no obvious political motivation and appears to be acting out of emotional attachment to another country.He pointed to the rousing reception in Italy for doctors sent by Albania, one of the poorest nations in Europe.By contrast, China’s aid has been met by suspicion that Beijing is trying to assert itself or obscure the origins of the respiratory sickness, which was first discovered in the metropolis of Wuhan.last_img read more