CEO of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters joins Saint Michael’s Board of Trustees

first_imgCEO of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters joins Saint Michael’s Board of TrusteesLawrence J. Blanford, president and chief executive officer of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Waterbury, Vt., has joined the Saint Michael’s College board of trustees and attended meetings on campus Dec. 5 and 6.”I felt very privileged to be asked to join the Saint Michael’s board,” Blanford said, explaining that he had become familiar with the college by attending Mass in the college’s Chapel of Saint Michael the Archangel since moving to Vermont. Blanford and his family came to the area 18 months ago.”We’ve been thrilled with the masses at Saint Michael’s, he said. “The Edmundite priests are wonderful speakers and it’s a beautiful mass with five, six or even seven priestsI look forward to it every week.”Mr. Blanford came to know SMC President Jack Neuhauser at Mass and through that relationship was invited to join the college’s board. Having just finished a term on the board of Clark-Atlanta University, he had the time and “was thrilled to become a part of Saint Michael’s College.”Mr. Blanford has a history of leading companies. Prior to joining Green Mountain Coffee Roasters in 2007, he was CEO of Royal Group Technologies, Toronto, Canada, from 2005 to 2006; president and CEO of Philips Consumer Electronics, Atlanta, from 2001 to 2003; president of Maytag Appliances, Newton, Iowa, 1998 to 2000; and had previously held management positions with Johns Manville, Denver; PPG Industries, Pittsburgh; and Proctor & Gamble, Cincinnati. He earned a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and a master’s in business administration from Xavier University in Cincinnati.Mr. Blanford and his wife Lynn, residents of South Burlington, Vt., have two children, Amanda, a sophomore in college in Ohio, and John a student at Rice Memorial High School in South Burlington.Saint Michael’s College, www.smcvt.edu(link is external), founded in 1904 by the Society of St. Edmund and headed by President John J. Neuhauser, is identified by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s Best 368 Colleges. A liberal arts, residential, Catholic college, Saint Michael’s is located just outside of Burlington, Vermont, one of America’s top college towns, and less than two hours from Montreal. As one of only 270 institutions nationwide with a prestigious Phi Beta Kappa chapter on campus, Saint Michael’s has 2,000 full-time undergraduate students, some 500 graduate students and 200 international students.In recent years Saint Michael’s students and professors have received Rhodes, Woodrow Wilson, Guggenheim, Fulbright, National Science Foundation and other grants, and Saint Michael’s professors have been named Vermont Professor of the Year in four of the last eight years. The college is currently listed as one of the nation’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges in the 2009 U.S. News & World Report rankings.-30-last_img read more

Recent rumblings from volcanoes in Central America not likely to affect Costa

first_imgRelated posts:Tourists pay up to $6,800 each to visit Costa Rica’s Isla del Coco National Park Turrialba Volcano erupts again, raining ash over San José Airbnb v. Uber: Sharing economy gets a mixed reception in Costa Rica VIDEO: Costa Rica’s Turrialba Volcano launches ash 800 meters into the sky Recent volcanic activity in El Salvador and Guatemala has Central American geologists keeping an eye on the region’s volcanoes, including Costa Rica’s Rincón de la Vieja.While Rincón de la Vieja and other Tico volcanoes have seen increased activity in recent years, geologists don’t foresee any immediate eruptions related to these giants.Smoke and ash spewing from the Chaparrastique Volcano after an “explosive eruption,” according to Celina Kattán, director of the Environmental Observatory, delayed air traffic over El Salvador on Dec. 29, 2013.Salvadoran authorities ordered the evacuation of some 500 residents.Guatemalan authorities reported that the Fuego Volcano erupted on Jan. 7, launching a column of smoke and ash into the air.Days later, on Jan. 11, Guatemala’s Pacaya Volcano erupted, triggering the evacuation of nearby communities. Air traffic control there recommended precautions for aircraft flying nearby.Professor and investigator Eliecer Duarte of the Volcanological and Seismological Observatory of Costa Rica noted that Costa Rica, along with its Central American neighbors, lies between the Cocos and Caribbean tectonic plates. But there’s no set “formula” for predicting volcanic activity, even if it takes place between the same plates.“We’re talking about a pretty broad area,” he said, noting the distance between Guatemala and Costa Rica – about 1,200 kilometers capital to capital.Duarte did say, however, that seismic activity elsewhere along plate lines could produce “instability.”Gino González, geologist with the National Seismological Network at the University of Costa Rica (UCR-RVS) agreed.González said that earthquakes along fault lines can trigger increased seismic and volcanic activity across the region, but there’s not necessarily any direct connection between volcanic activity in Guatemala and here.The UCR geologist said that volcanoes in Costa Rica are less likely to ooze lava, the way Guatemala’s Pacaya Volcano does. Rather, Tico volcanoes build up pressure and suddenly erupt, making them “a little more dangerous.”One volcano that volcanologists have had an eye on in recent years is Rincón de la Vieja, a 2-kilometer tall volcano in Costa Rica’s northwestern Guanacaste province.After a decade of calm, the volcano has been increasingly active starting in 2011, according to a Jan. 14 report from UCR-RVS. After the 2012 Sámara earthquake that rocked Costa Rica’s Pacific coast, seismic activity continued to rise in the crater.UCR-RVS volcanologists plan to make more frequent trips to the crater during 2014 to monitor its activity, including hot mudflows, and increased underground magma flows that could warm the volcano’s turquoise-colored acidic lake, according to the report.The last time Costa Rica saw a major eruption was Rincón de la Vieja in 1996, González said.Volcano tourism is one of Costa Rica’s major attractions.Arenal Volcano, a  cone volcano near La Fortuna, Alajuela, was once one of the region’s most active volcanoes, but has been slumbering since 2010. The volcano might not be as dramatic as it once was, but its picturesque peak continues to draw visitors.At least the sleepy giant doesn’t delay anyone’s flight home.AFP contributed to this report Facebook Commentslast_img read more