TCI Youth looking for mentors

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, November 30, 2017 – Providenciales – The Youth Department is looking for mentors.   The Big Brother, Big Sister program will have volunteers working with young people from 11 to 17 years old.    If you are interested contact the TCI Department of Youth Affairs today.#MagneticMediaNews#BigBrotherBigSisterprogram Related Items:#BigBrotherBigSisterprogram, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Libya mosque attack kills one injures 62

first_imgMembers of the self-styled Libyan National Army, loyal to the country`s east strongman Khalifa Haftar, patrol the roads leading into the eastern city of Benghazi on 7 February, 2018. Photo: AFPTwin bomb blasts struck a mosque in Benghazi in eastern Libya on Friday, killing one person and wounding more than 62, the city’s main hospital said.The explosions hit the mosque at the start of weekly prayers in Libya’s second city, which lies 1,000 kilometres (620 miles) east of Tripoli, a security source told AFP.One bomb was hidden in a coffin in the courtyard of the mosque and another in a shoe cabinet at the entrance, the source added.At least one person was killed and 62 wounded, according to a spokeswoman for the city’s Al-Jala hospital, Fadia al-Barghathi.The blast follows twin car bombings on 24 January outside a mosque in Benghazi that left nearly 40 people dead.There was no claim of responsibility for that attack, which underscored the ongoing chaos in the Benghazi region which is controlled by the forces of military strongman Khalifa Haftar.Haftar, who opposes a UN-backed unity government based in Tripoli, announced Benghazi’s “liberation” from jihadists in July last year after a three-year campaign, but sporadic violence has continued.Libya has been wracked by violence and divisions since dictator Moamer Kadhafi was toppled and killed in a 2011 NATO-backed uprising.On 11 September, 2012, suspected jihadists linked to Al-Qaeda attacked the US consulate in Benghazi, killing ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.last_img

Researchers create 3D stereoscopic color prints with nanopixels

first_img The researchers, led by Professor Joel K.W. Yang, at A*STAR (the Agency for Science, Technology and Research) in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and the Singapore University of Technology and Design, have published a paper on the new technique for realizing 3D full-color stereoscopic prints in a recent issue of Nature Communications.”We have created possibly the smallest-ever stereoscopic images using pixels formed from plasmonic nanostructures,” Yang told Phys.org. “Such stereoscopic images do not require the viewer to don special glasses, but instead, the depth perception and 3D effect is created simply by viewing the print through an optical microscope coupled with polarizers.”The work is based on the concept of surface plasmon resonance: metal nanostructures can scatter different wavelengths (colors) of light due to the fact that the tiny nanostructures themselves resonate at different wavelengths. If a nanostructure is circular, its resonance is polarization-independent because the diameter of the circle is the same from all directions. However, if a nanostructure is biaxial (such as an ellipse or rectangle), its resonance will depend on the polarization of the incident light. By tailoring the exact dimensions of the biaxial nanopixels, researchers can generate different colors under different polarizations.Building on these ideas, the researchers in the current study have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive nanopixels that encode two sets of information can be used to produce 3D stereoscopic microprints. To do this, the researchers created nanopixels out of tiny pieces of aluminum a hundred or so nanometers across. The scientists experimented with nanopixels in two different shapes: elliptical and coupled nanosquare dimers (a pair of squares separated by a very small gap). This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. To demonstrate how these nanopixels could enable high-resolution 3D color microprints, the researchers designed a stereoscopic image containing stars on a 2D sheet by overlaying two slightly displaced views of the same image onto the same area. Then they added an x- and y-polarizer to the eyepieces of a microscope. Viewing the microprint through this stereomicroscope reveals a different image for each polarization, and the combined images appear as a 3D image.In addition to 3D prints, the polarization-sensitive nanopixels could have several other applications.”One can envision application of these prints to high-density optical information encoding or holography,” Yang said. “3D security elements that are difficult to replicate, and which offer different levels of authentication, could also be generated for anti-counterfeiting and anti-forgery technologies.”The researchers also note that it’s possible to make pixels that can encode not just two, but three or more images in a single pixel. For example, nanostructures that have circularly asymmetric shapes could have more than two polarization-dependent resonances due to the additional circularly polarized dimension. The researchers also plan to take steps toward commercialization.”Moving forward, there is much interest in developing techniques for creating such prints with significantly lower cost and higher throughput, both of which are imperative for this technology to be implementable at an industrial level,” Yang said. More information: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. “Three-dimensional plasmonic stereoscopic prints in full color.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6361 Because these shapes are biaxial, they exhibit plasmonic resonances at different wavelengths for each axis, with the colors determined almost entirely by the dimension of the axis parallel to the polarization direction. For example, a 130-nm x 190-nm elliptical pixel appears green under y-polarized light and purple under x-polarized light. Comparing the two pixel shapes, the researchers found that the elliptical pixels have a broader range of polarization-dependent colors, while the nanosquare dimer pixels have lower levels of cross-talk, minimizing unwanted mixing of colors. Microprints of a square and cross printed onto the same area formed from (a) elliptical nanopixels and (b) coupled nanosquare pixels under x- and y-polarized light. (c) SEM image of the region indicated by the dotted box in (b). (d) Images decoupled by polarizers. (e) Overlay of images in (d) to form a stereoscopic image with depth perception. (f) SEM image of the region indicated by the dotted box in (e). Credit: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited Journal information: Nature Communications Citation: Researchers create 3-D stereoscopic color prints with nanopixels (2014, November 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-d-stereoscopic-nanopixels.html Meta-hologram produces dual images and multiple colors (w/ Video) Explore further (Phys.org) —By designing nanopixels that encode two sets of information—or colors of light—within the same pixel, researchers have developed a new method for making 3D color prints. Each pixel can exhibit one of two colors depending on the polarization of the light used to illuminate it. So by viewing the pixels under light of both polarizations, two separate images can be seen. If the two images are chosen to be slightly displaced views of the same scene, viewing both simultaneously results in depth perception and the impression of a 3D stereoscopic image. © 2014 Phys.org (Left) Elliptical and coupled nanosquare pixels scatter different wavelengths of light depending on polarization. (Right) The stereomicroscope setup uses different polarizers on each eyepiece to image two superposed microprints which contain pixels that present two laterally displaced images to the left and right eyes of a viewer, resulting in depth perception. Credit: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limitedlast_img read more

Pocketfriendly stop for students

first_imgOne of the oldest lane surrounding the north campus – ‘Hudson Lane’ – has stood the test of time, competing with fancy restaurants and cafes in the Capital. But what is so special about this place that people choose it over lavish restaurants?With a plethora of hangout options that are not only easily accessible but exceptionally budget-friendly, it is an ideal place for foodies. Lying close to the Kamla Nehru College, the place is highly popular among the students. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”I went to this place on the first day of my college and haven’t been able to get enough of it,” said Harshit Jain, a student of Kamla Nehru College, adding, “This is one place where all my friends meet every single day. Besides offering myriad flavors from different cuisines, the aura of the place is amazing. It’s a stop where can just sit and chill for hours, without any sort of restriction.”Despite the sudden rise in cafes and changing food scene of the lane, this place stays true to its roots. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”I have seen this place grow and change. When I was a student, I used to be excited all the time for Charan Singh’s food van or Surinder’s chole bhature. Eating shahi paneer and rajma chawal over a few laughs was one of those memories I still cherish. The best part was interacting with the cooks in the food joint while learning how to make our favourite dishes. People in this area have always been extremely friendly and cheerful. We feel at home when we come here,” said Tanmay Goel, student from Shaheed Bhagat Singh. Though Satya Niketan – the area surrounding south campus, is equally popular among the college goers, Hudson lane gets an upper hand when it comes to a society meeting or a casual lunch gathering. One of the major reason for people choosing Hudson over Satya Niketan is the open space it has. Hudson is designed over a big place and the cafes are widely spread. People don’t have to necessarily to go and sit in cafes. They can eat street food or sit in parks in this area. On the other hand, Satya Niketan is congested and has cafes next to each other, making it extremely crowded. Even though new restaurants are opened on a daily basis in this cute-little lane, people preferably sit and eat in their favorite old restaurants. “I personally love trying new cuisines and places. But even though there are quite a few nice cafes that have opened up in this area, Ricos, Hudson Cafe or BYD will always remain my favourite. It’s not that I don’t like the new cafes, but the old ones have a homely feel to it. We are accustomed to the ambiance and are really not over it yet,” said Anushi Arora, Miranda House.If you haven’t visited the area yet, go and check out. It has a number of options which will convince you to come back again.last_img read more