TCI Youth looking for mentors

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, November 30, 2017 – Providenciales – The Youth Department is looking for mentors.   The Big Brother, Big Sister program will have volunteers working with young people from 11 to 17 years old.    If you are interested contact the TCI Department of Youth Affairs today.#MagneticMediaNews#BigBrotherBigSisterprogram Related Items:#BigBrotherBigSisterprogram, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Cunningham hails Cardiffs deserved victory

first_imgCardiff City defender Greg Cunningham says hard work paid off for them in their shocking 1-0 victory at Leicester City on Saturday.Víctor Camarasa hit a stunning injury-time strike to hand the visitors their first away win of the season after James Madisson failed to score from the penalty spot.It was an impressive result for Cardiff City who moved further clear of the relegation zone, and Cunningham is proud of his team’s display at the King Power Stadium.“I don’t think he could have hit it any sweeter,” Cunningham told the club’s website, speaking of Camarasa’s goal.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…“That’s the quality that he possesses and we’re very grateful to have somebody of his caliber at the Club.“Away from home it’s vital to stay as solid as possible and the longer we hold on, the more the opposition will get frustrated. They’re the home side and have added pressure to entertain their home fans.“Everyone’s been working so hard and putting a shift in and it’s a deserved result.”last_img read more

Origin PC acquired by Corsair so you dont have to build your

first_img Share your voice Computers Computer Accessories Laptops Gaming Tags Comments Corsair just bought Origin PC.  Corsair PC gamers might have a lot to look forward to. Corsair, a computer peripherals and hardware company, on Wednesday said it’s acquired Origin PC. Origin PC specializes in hand-built, personalized computers designed to optimize the gaming experience. The companies plan to expand Corsair’s iCUE software ecosystem into Origin PC’s systems, according to a press release. Corsair says this will offer gamers systemwide lighting synchronization and performance monitoring. In addition, the new range of Corsair Hydro X Series custom cooling will soon be found in select Origin PC systems.Financial terms of the deal weren’t revealed, but Corsair said Origin will remain a separate brand. All existing warranties, purchases and support are unaffected, according to the release. Corsair will continue producing its own product line — Vengeance PC, Corsair One and the Corsair One Pro — and brands. Andy Paul, founder and CEO of Corsair, said one of the reasons the company acquired Origin PC was the desire to reach more North American customers who wanted to buy systems, not build them. “With Origin PC’s expertise in personalized custom gaming systems and Corsair’s strength in performance PC hardware and the iCUE software ecosystem, we’re excited to combine our efforts to create new world-class gaming experiences for PC gamers,” Paul said in the release.Origin PC CEO Kevin Wasielewski said Corsair was a “fantastic partner” to help the company move forward. “With a complete range of enthusiast PC products, Origin PC and Corsair are uniquely placed to create amazing new systems that make the experience of owning a personalized custom gaming PC better than ever,” Wasielewski said in the release.  2 Now playing: Watch this: 1:30 Origin PC brings a 16-inch gaming laptop to CES 2019last_img read more

Researchers create 3D stereoscopic color prints with nanopixels

first_img The researchers, led by Professor Joel K.W. Yang, at A*STAR (the Agency for Science, Technology and Research) in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and the Singapore University of Technology and Design, have published a paper on the new technique for realizing 3D full-color stereoscopic prints in a recent issue of Nature Communications.”We have created possibly the smallest-ever stereoscopic images using pixels formed from plasmonic nanostructures,” Yang told Phys.org. “Such stereoscopic images do not require the viewer to don special glasses, but instead, the depth perception and 3D effect is created simply by viewing the print through an optical microscope coupled with polarizers.”The work is based on the concept of surface plasmon resonance: metal nanostructures can scatter different wavelengths (colors) of light due to the fact that the tiny nanostructures themselves resonate at different wavelengths. If a nanostructure is circular, its resonance is polarization-independent because the diameter of the circle is the same from all directions. However, if a nanostructure is biaxial (such as an ellipse or rectangle), its resonance will depend on the polarization of the incident light. By tailoring the exact dimensions of the biaxial nanopixels, researchers can generate different colors under different polarizations.Building on these ideas, the researchers in the current study have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive nanopixels that encode two sets of information can be used to produce 3D stereoscopic microprints. To do this, the researchers created nanopixels out of tiny pieces of aluminum a hundred or so nanometers across. The scientists experimented with nanopixels in two different shapes: elliptical and coupled nanosquare dimers (a pair of squares separated by a very small gap). This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. To demonstrate how these nanopixels could enable high-resolution 3D color microprints, the researchers designed a stereoscopic image containing stars on a 2D sheet by overlaying two slightly displaced views of the same image onto the same area. Then they added an x- and y-polarizer to the eyepieces of a microscope. Viewing the microprint through this stereomicroscope reveals a different image for each polarization, and the combined images appear as a 3D image.In addition to 3D prints, the polarization-sensitive nanopixels could have several other applications.”One can envision application of these prints to high-density optical information encoding or holography,” Yang said. “3D security elements that are difficult to replicate, and which offer different levels of authentication, could also be generated for anti-counterfeiting and anti-forgery technologies.”The researchers also note that it’s possible to make pixels that can encode not just two, but three or more images in a single pixel. For example, nanostructures that have circularly asymmetric shapes could have more than two polarization-dependent resonances due to the additional circularly polarized dimension. The researchers also plan to take steps toward commercialization.”Moving forward, there is much interest in developing techniques for creating such prints with significantly lower cost and higher throughput, both of which are imperative for this technology to be implementable at an industrial level,” Yang said. More information: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. “Three-dimensional plasmonic stereoscopic prints in full color.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6361 Because these shapes are biaxial, they exhibit plasmonic resonances at different wavelengths for each axis, with the colors determined almost entirely by the dimension of the axis parallel to the polarization direction. For example, a 130-nm x 190-nm elliptical pixel appears green under y-polarized light and purple under x-polarized light. Comparing the two pixel shapes, the researchers found that the elliptical pixels have a broader range of polarization-dependent colors, while the nanosquare dimer pixels have lower levels of cross-talk, minimizing unwanted mixing of colors. Microprints of a square and cross printed onto the same area formed from (a) elliptical nanopixels and (b) coupled nanosquare pixels under x- and y-polarized light. (c) SEM image of the region indicated by the dotted box in (b). (d) Images decoupled by polarizers. (e) Overlay of images in (d) to form a stereoscopic image with depth perception. (f) SEM image of the region indicated by the dotted box in (e). Credit: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited Journal information: Nature Communications Citation: Researchers create 3-D stereoscopic color prints with nanopixels (2014, November 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-d-stereoscopic-nanopixels.html Meta-hologram produces dual images and multiple colors (w/ Video) Explore further (Phys.org) —By designing nanopixels that encode two sets of information—or colors of light—within the same pixel, researchers have developed a new method for making 3D color prints. Each pixel can exhibit one of two colors depending on the polarization of the light used to illuminate it. So by viewing the pixels under light of both polarizations, two separate images can be seen. If the two images are chosen to be slightly displaced views of the same scene, viewing both simultaneously results in depth perception and the impression of a 3D stereoscopic image. © 2014 Phys.org (Left) Elliptical and coupled nanosquare pixels scatter different wavelengths of light depending on polarization. (Right) The stereomicroscope setup uses different polarizers on each eyepiece to image two superposed microprints which contain pixels that present two laterally displaced images to the left and right eyes of a viewer, resulting in depth perception. Credit: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limitedlast_img read more