CRISPR patent wars highlight problem of granting broad intellectual property rights for

first_imgCRISPR-associated protein Cas9 (white) from Staphylococcus aureus based on Protein Database ID 5AXW. Credit: Thomas Splettstoesser (Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 4.0) Citation: CRISPR patent wars highlight problem of granting broad intellectual property rights for tech that offers public benefits (2017, November 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-crispr-patent-wars-highlight-problem.html CRISPR-Cas9 is a cutting-edge gene editing technique. It has been in the news as many researchers are using it to conduct gene editing research. But it has also been in the news because two parties are claiming they invented it. They are the University of California and the Broad Institute. It is believed that patent rights will generate a significant amount of revenue for the ultimate winner of the war due to licensing rights.As Rai and Cook-Degan note, the patent war (or another one like it) has been in the making for several decades due to passage of the Bayh-Dole Act back in 1980, which allowed entities to obtain patents on work done for federally funded research efforts. In the CRISPR war, both parties received funding from NIH and both applied for patents, but the timing is murky. But as the authors also note, something that should not be lost or overlooked in the legal wrangling is the rights of the public. If one party in the war wins, they are set to assume control over who can use the gene editing technique and in which sorts of ways. In granting such full ownership to a single entity, the courts could be hindering genetic research in possibly detrimental ways. What if a team of researchers is making progress on eliminating a genetic disease, for example, but is slowed because it cannot gain licensing to proceed? Innocent people might thus suffer due to a court decision. The authors suggest that the solution is for the courts to move away from granting broad patents in such cases and instead grant narrow patents that allow the holder some rights, but not all, creating a more open system of use for cutting-edge technology. (Phys.org)—Duke University Law professor Arti Rai and bio-technology professor Robert Cook-Deegan with Arizona State University have stepped into the gene editing patent war with an Intellectual Property Policy Forum paper they have had published in the journal Science. They suggest that courts should take more into account than who invented what first in some property rights disputes. With technology, such as CRISPR-Cas9, for example, they argue that some thought (and rights) should to be given to the public as beneficiaries of future research efforts related to that technology. Journal information: Science © 2017 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further Gene editing patent ruling sways fortune of biotech hopefuls More information: Racing for academic glory and patents: Lessons from CRISPR, Science  17 Nov 2017: Vol. 358, Issue 6365, pp. 874-876, DOI: 10.1126/science.aao2468 , http://science.sciencemag.org/content/358/6365/874SummaryThe much-publicized dispute over patent rights to CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology highlights tensions that have been percolating for almost four decades, since the U.S. Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 invoked patents as a mechanism for promoting commercialization of federally funded research. With the encouragement provided by Bayh-Dole, academic scientists and their research institutions now race in dual competitive domains: the quest for glory in academic research and in the patent sphere. Yet, a robust economic literature argues that races are often socially wasteful; the racing parties expend duplicative resources, in terms of both the research itself and the legal fees spent attempting to acquire patents, all in the pursuit of what may be a modest acceleration of invention. For CRISPR, and future races involving broadly useful technologies for which it may set a precedent, the relationship between these competitive domains needs to be parsed carefully. On the basis of legal maneuvers thus far, it appears that the litigants will try for broad rights; public benefit will depend on courts reining them in and, when broad patents slip through, on updating Bayh-Dole’s pro-commercialization safeguards with underused features of the Act. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Personal Travel Manager learns to ski at Club Med VillarssurOllon

first_imgOne day in Paris – TravelManagers’ personal travel manager Lesley Cavill must do’s include a visit to the Eiffel TowerPersonal Travel Manager Learns to Ski at Club Med Villars-sur-OllonFor many, Club Med conjures up images of sun, sand and beach holidays however as personal travel manager Lesley Cavill discovers, Club Med also provides the easiest ski holiday ever.Cavill, representative for Mosman Park in Western Australia recently experienced a ten-night ski famil to Switzerland, courtesy of Club Med Villars-sur-Ollon and Cathay Pacific.“It’s not every day you learn to ski in the Swiss Alps and I certainly made the most of Club Med’s huge range of activities and really got involved! Club Med provided all of the ski equipment hire, and we had an amazing ski instructor Tamara who was with us every step of the way.  She started with the basics and was really patient and supportive as we tackled the slopes during our lessons. There were plenty of laughs, tumbles and falls, but it was a great sense of personal accomplishment when I finished a run still upright!”Club Med with its all-inclusive concept offers a unique holiday experience.“With all of your meals, alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks including cocktails, entertainment and sporting activities included in the cost, it really does provide an easy and carefree way to holiday.”For Cavill, a standout memory was sitting in a deck chair in the snow enjoying mulled wine and hot soup.“I can highly recommend the Club Med exclusive High Altitude Restaurant located half way up the mountain. Enjoying our entrée reclining in a deck chair in the snow was hilarious. There is something about the snow that brings out your playful side. It was a truly magical experience.”Making the most of the unique all-in-one Mountain Lift Pass and experiencing Switzerland just like a client would was the highlight for Cavill.“Being able to share my extensive personal travel experience and product knowledge with my clients is an absolute priority for me. I simply loved that our Mountain Lift Pass allowed travel on the local trains. The ability to get out and experience local village life was fantastic and I really loved seeing the breathtaking snow-capped mountains in every direction as the train meandered through the slopes.”The group flew from Australia with Cathay Pacific via Hong Kong to Paris. The group enjoyed one night in Paris before travelling by train to Lausanne followed by an hour and a quarter bus transfer to Villars-sur-Ollon.“Our full day in Paris was wonderful. We walked from our hotel in Republique all the way along the River Seine to the Eiffel Tower. It was a clear sunny day and it was the perfect way take in all the sights and break up all the travelling.”Cavill discovers Cathay Pacific offers a real commitment to service.“Travelling on Cathay Pacific was an absolute pleasure. Having booked so many of my clients on the airline it was great to experience it for myself.  The friendly crew provide unfaltering service which combined with modern entertainment systems gives me the confidence to continue recommending Cathay Pacific to my clients without hesitation.” Travel Managersfor more information, visit Source = TravelManagers Australialast_img read more