Black athletes have long history of not sticking to sports

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Carlos said Mexico City was the only place he could’ve made such a statement.“At that time, for me, there was no other vehicle than the Olympic Games,” he recalled. “I felt like the humanitarian issues at that time, as well as the humanitarian issues of today, are more compelling to me than an Olympic medal. I love the Olympics and I love sports, but I love a just cause for humanity even greater.”It is a sentiment shared by NFL players.The killing of mostly unarmed black men by mostly white police officers sparked the Black Lives Matter movement, which has again drawn black athletes into the national conversation on race . The sideline protests in the NFL — started in August 2016 by Kaepernick — have been the most prominent display of players’ engagement, though black athletes in baseball and basketball have also had smaller displays of activism.Because sports are such a prominent aspect of American life, they remain an effective way to bring attention to issues of racial injustice.“This is our inheritance,” said Howard Bryant, senior writer at ESPN and author of the forthcoming book “The Heritage: Black Athletes, A Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism.”“You’re not allowed to check out,” Bryant said. “This is going to continue until the United States respects the black brain more than the black body. Then sports can go back to what it was supposed to be — just a game.”Media — and social media in particular — has helped in recruiting athletes to the cause, explained Color of Change Executive Director Rashad Robinson, whose online civil rights organization has joined with athletes in addressing systemic racism and mobilized its membership to boycott the NFL and its corporate sponsors.Such stands have often come at a cost, even for today’s players, who are far more prominent and wealthy than their predecessors. Like players who spoke out before them, they have been met with violence and vitriol, described as unpatriotic, ungrateful and disrespectful.“The public is used to black guys selling sneakers and making jump shots,” said Bryant. “Do white people want to hear what black people have to say? No, they don’t. Does it need to be said? Yes.” AFP official booed out of forum “The whole purpose of the demonstrations is to get (fans’) attention,” Kareem Abdul-Jabbar said in an interview with The Associated Press. “These are the people that ignore the fact that people are being shot dead in the street. They’ve found ways to ignore it.”For weeks, some NFL players, most of them African-American, knelt silently on the sidelines as the national anthem played before kickoff. Their goal: to raise awareness about disparities in policing in communities of color, and about persistent, systemic racism in America.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt was a new approach to an age-old problem.“It’s because of what happens to him that others know they have to toe the line,” said New York University historian Jeffrey Sammons. “They can’t be seen as defiant or opponents of the system . They know they can’t succeed without living up to expectations and being humble, unassuming and supportive of the established order.” Then came along Muhammad Ali, who was not one to toe the line.Ali was the most visible and influential athlete of his generation when he protested the Vietnam War as racially unjust by refusing to be drafted in 1967, a move that cost him his livelihood, derailing his fighting career for years.Ali’s actions influenced others. Basketball player Abdul-Jabbar boycotted the 1968 Summer Olympics. At the same games, held in Mexico City, American track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos held raised fists covered in black leather gloves as the national anthem played after winning gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race.Abdul-Jabbar, who at 70 represents a bridge between Ali and Kaepernick, went on to a storied NBA career, but Smith and Carlos returned home to the threat of having their medals taken, and faced difficulty finding coaching jobs.“It was an international stage that was being used to promote how unified and wonderful the world is, but black Americans at that point were still in a very tough struggle to obtain their rights, both human and political,” Abdul-Jabbar said of the 1968 games. “The fact that (Smith and Carlos) used an international platform to speak for people who usually don’t have any power to be heard made it all the more significant.”ADVERTISEMENT Mayweather drops another hint at MMA fight Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games PLAY LIST 01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LATEST STORIES MOST READ NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerscenter_img Read Next Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Abdul-Jabbar agreed, tying Ali’s fate to Kaepernick’s as two athletes who sacrificed their livelihoods at the height of their careers for a greater cause.“Anybody that knows anything about football will tell you that he is a talented athlete and should be on somebody’s team,” Abdul-Jabbar, author of “Becoming Kareem: Growing Up On and Off the Court,” said of Kaepernick. “I think he’s being blackballed.”But with the cost are also benefits. Using the universal language of sports as a platform to discuss race reveals racism and galvanizes support to end it, Robinson said.“Part of why people are paying attention is because of exactly who they are,” he said. “Throughout time, it has been the people with reputations and something to lose whose risk-taking has helped result in change.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding FILE – In this Feb. 25, 1966 file photo, While Illinois Athletic Commission listened, heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali speaks, in Chicago. Ali had criticized his imminent army draft. (AP Photo/File)This year’s NFL season featured two of America’s pastimes: football and race, with pre-game protests dividing fans along color lines and making Sunday afternoons among the most segregated hours in the country.While some fans would prefer players stick to sports, many black athletes have chosen a different path by protesting, making people uncomfortable.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoiseslast_img read more

SNOW & ICE CONTRIBUTE TO 5PM COMMUTE ACCIDENTS

first_imgLIGHT SNOW AND FALLING TEMPERATURES LED TO SEVERAL ACCIDENTS DURING THE 5PM COMMUTE HOME WEDNESDAY EVENING IN SIOUX CITY.ICING ON THE GORDON DRIVE VIADUCT LED TO A SERIES OF FENDER BENDERS AT THAT TIME THAT CLOSED DOWN THE VIADUCT FOR A TIME.TWO ACCIDENTS, INCLUDING A ROLLOVER, OCCURRED AT HIGHWAY 20 AND SOUTH LAKEPORT.MINOR INJURIES WERE REPORTED FROM THE ROLLOVER TO THE TWO OCCUPANTS.OTHER ACCIDENTS WERE REPORTED IN THE 3400 BLOCK OF SOUTH RUSTIN AND THE 5000 BLOCK OF HIGHWAY 75 NORTH.Photo by Iowa DOT Traffic Camlast_img read more

Entertainment a Major Source of Growth – Grange

first_imgStory Highlights Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says the Government is reinforcing entertainment in Jamaica as a major source of growth and development. The National Carnival in Jamaica Stakeholders Committee, under the Sports and Entertainment Network of the Tourism Linkages Network, is spearheading the initiative, which forms part of broader efforts to enhance and package various local entertainment offerings to attract more visitors to the island. Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says the Government is reinforcing entertainment in Jamaica as a major source of growth and development.She noted that Reggae Month and Jamaica Carnival are two major projects under the rubric of festival tourism that will be strengthened in the upcoming year.She was speaking at the launch of Carnival in Jamaica 2018 on Thursday (October 19) at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel, New Kingston.Following the highly successful inaugural 2017 Carnival in Jamaica initiative, the Government is again partnering with carnival stakeholders for this year’s staging.Carnival in Jamaica will be the umbrella brand for all carnival-related activities during the peak period of March 31 to April 8, 2018, making it a national product.The National Carnival in Jamaica Stakeholders Committee, under the Sports and Entertainment Network of the Tourism Linkages Network, is spearheading the initiative, which forms part of broader efforts to enhance and package various local entertainment offerings to attract more visitors to the island.Ms. Grange noted that over the last 15 years, carnival in Jamaica has been the fastest growing event of its kind in the Caribbean.She said the collaboration over the past year between her Ministry and the Ministry of Tourism underscores the understanding that partnership is needed to propel a growing industry that is a contributor to the creative economy.Ms. Grange said the unique nature of “our carnival is the infusion of Jamaican dancehall music and culture in events, and through collaborations between Jamaican artistes and soca/calypso artistes across the region”.“This authentic Jamaican flavour added to events has led to increased visitor arrivals for the annual parade. The promotion of Jamaican culture regionally and internationally is an advantage to the annual staging of carnival in Jamaica that enhances our tourism product,” she pointed out.Ms. Grange said that Carnival 2018 is about to be activated, with the first band, Xaymaca International, set to launch on November 11; Exodus on November 18; Bacchanal in January 2018; followed by Jamaica Carnival.She noted that the carnival atmosphere will spread all over Jamaica although the main events are held in Kingston.Ms. Grange congratulated the four bands that will be participating in Carnival 2018, noting that the number is expected to grow to eight over the next few years.Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, for his part, said that carnival is an opportunity to broaden the entertainment offerings of Kingston and increase tourist arrivals in the country.He said a key objective of the Ministry is to encourage visitors to spend more and have a greater percentage of the tourist dollar remain in the country.“And to do that, carnival must play a big role, because last carnival US$2.3 million was in circulation in the city of Kingston and … that is nearly J$300 million. If we double the size of carnival, can you imagine that is close to J$1 billion in circulation. Who gets it? The little man… the hotels get a little bit (too),” he pointed out. Ms. Grange said that Carnival 2018 is about to be activated, with the first band, Xaymaca International, set to launch on November 11; Exodus on November 18; Bacchanal in January 2018; followed by Jamaica Carnival. last_img read more