Fed Chair Says this is Americas 1 Threat leaked

first_img Fed Chair Says this is America’s #1 Threat [leaked in CA mtg] Imagine the secrets Fed chairwoman Janet Yellen is privy to: thwarted bank runs, interest rate spikes… the truth behind major swings in gold prices. So when she confessed America’s #1 risk at a private meeting in California, it’s no surprise word leaked out. She says this event could lead us into a “devastating spiral.” We at Casey Research believe it has already started. Click here for the full story. Recommended Links – — Companies are hiding more from you than you realize… Back in the late 90s, energy company Enron was a Wall Street darling. From 1998 to 2000, its stock surged 342%. It became America’s seventh biggest corporation…but the company was a farce. Management used shady accounting to inflate its sales and profits. When the fraud came to light, Enron’s stock plummeted. In 2001, it filed for bankruptcy. • In April, former Enron CEO Andy Fastow issued a serious warning… Fastow was one of the main actors in the Enron scandal. He spent six years in jail for his crimes. According to Fastow, many corporate executives are now doing what he did at Enron. He even accused tech giant Apple (AAPL) of misleading investors. Business Insider reported: His point – an entirely correct one – is that the world’s largest company today is engaged in tax dodging behavior that, while perhaps technically legal, is clearly designed to increase profits and inflate the stock by misleading and confusing regulators (and perhaps investors) via a massively complex web of entities – exactly what he did at Enron! And this is 100% routine, common behavior among most large US companies. Some people might find Fastow’s claim ridiculous. He is a convicted felon, after all. But Casey readers know better than to trust Corporate America. • Regulators have accused Valeant (VRX) and SunEdison (SUNE) of similar crimes… You’ve probably heard about the drug maker Valeant and the renewable energy company SunEdison. Their downfalls have been two of the year’s biggest investing stories. Like Enron, both companies were hot investments. From January 2013 to July 2015, Valeant gained 332%. SunEdison’s stock surged 892% over the same period. Like Enron, both companies used “creative accounting.” According to The Wall Street Journal, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is investigating whether “SunEdison misrepresented its cash position to investors as its stock collapsed.” Valeant is under investigation for its pricing and accounting practices. And like Enron, both stocks have crashed. SunEdison plunged 99% before it announced plans to file bankruptcy. Valeant’s stock has plummeted 89%. • The mainstream media paints Valeant and SunEdison as a couple “bad apples”… According to most reports, it’s rare for public companies to pull tricks on investors. But if you’ve been reading the Dispatch, you know that’s not true. For the past few months, we’ve been telling you about the huge surge in share buybacks. A share buyback is when a company buys its own stock from shareholders. Buybacks reduce the number of shares that trade on the market. This boosts a company’s earnings per share, which can lead to a higher stock price. But buybacks do not actually improve the business. They just make it look better “on paper.” According to research firm FactSet, 76% of the companies in the S&P 500 bought back their own shares between November and January. Most companies used debt to pay for these buybacks. The Wall Street Journal reported last week: The biggest 1,500 nonfinancial companies in the U.S. increased their net debt by $409 billion in the year to the end of March, according to Société Générale, using almost all—$388 billion—to buy their own shares, net of newly issued stock. Companies have become far and away the biggest customer for their own shares. • Companies are also using “financial engineering” to make their businesses appear healthier… Financial engineering is when companies use accounting tricks to goose their sales, profits, or cash on the balance sheet. It’s how Enron, Valeant, and SunEdison hid problems from investors. Many other companies are doing similar things… As you may know, U.S. corporations are required to report “GAAP” earnings per share. GAAP-based earnings comply with accepted accounting guidelines. A growing number of companies are also reporting “adjusted” earnings that do not comply with GAAP. Many companies use adjusted earnings to strip out “temporary” factors like the strong dollar or a warm winter. Management decides what to leave out and include when measuring adjusted earnings. • Two-thirds of the companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average report adjusted earnings… In 2014, adjusted earnings were 12% better than GAAP earnings. Last year, they were 31% better. Companies say adjusted earnings give a more complete picture of their business. But it’s becoming obvious that companies are using non-GAAP earnings to hide weaknesses. As Dispatch readers know, the U.S. is in its weakest “recovery” since World War II. Europe, Japan, and China are all growing at their slowest pace in decades too. With the economy so weak, many companies have had to “get creative” to grow earnings. • Sales for companies in the S&P 500 have fallen four straight quarters… Earnings are on track to decline a fourth straight quarter. That hasn’t happened since the 2008-2009 financial crisis. These results would be even uglier if companies didn’t report adjusted earnings. You see, it’s much easier for companies to mask weak sales or profits when the economy is growing. When the economy slows, those problems become too big to hide. Right now, the global economy is clearly slowing. So expect to hear about more “Enrons” in the coming months.center_img Regards, Justin Spittler Delray Beach, Florida May 10, 2016 We want to hear from you. If you have a question or comment, please send it to feedback@caseyresearch.com. We read every email that comes in, and we’ll publish comments, questions, and answers that we think other readers will find useful. • The stock market is a dangerous place to put your money right now… If you’re going to invest in stocks, keep three important things in mind… You should avoid investing in businesses you don’t understand. Many hedge funds wish they had followed this advice with Valeant and SunEdison… Despite these companies’ complex and unclear business models, some of the largest hedge funds in the world invested in them. This earned Valeant and SunEdison the nickname “hedge fund hotels.” We also encourage you to avoid companies with a lot of debt. These firms will struggle to pay the bills as the economy worsens. Finally, we recommend you steer clear of companies that need buybacks to increase earnings. Buybacks can give stocks a temporary boost, but they’re no way to grow a business. In short, money spent on buybacks is money not spent on new machinery, equipment, or anything else that can help a company grow. It’s especially a poor use of cash when stocks are expensive…like they are today. • We encourage you to set aside cash and own physical gold… A cash reserve will help you avoid big losses during the next big selloff. It will also put you in a position to buy world-class businesses for cheap after the “rotten apples” are exposed. Physical gold is another proven way to defend your wealth. Gold has served as real money for centuries because it has a rare set of qualities: It’s durable, transportable, easily divisible, has intrinsic value, and is consistent across the world. It’s also protected wealth through the worst financial crises in history. Investors buy it when they’re nervous about stocks or the economy. This year, gold is up 22%. It’s at its highest level since January 2015. For other proven strategies to protect your money from a stock market crash, watch this short video. In it, you’ll learn how to fully “crisis proof” your wealth. Click here to view this free presentation. Chart of the Day The U.S. stock market is wobbling on one leg… Dispatch readers know buybacks have been a major driver of U.S. stocks. Since 2009, S&P 500 companies have shelled out more than $2 trillion on buybacks. As noted, buybacks can make earnings look better “on paper.” They can also prop up share prices. With the economy slowing and earnings in decline, buybacks have been one of the things keeping stocks afloat…but even that’s starting to give way. Today’s chart compares the performance of PowerShares Buyback Achievers Fund (PKW) this year versus the S&P 500. PKW tracks companies that bought back more than 5% of their shares over the past year. Holdings include McDonald’s (MCD), Lowes (LOWE), and Macy’s (M). From March 2009 to May 2015, PKW gained 314%. The S&P 500 rose 215% over the same period. Since then, PKW has fallen 10%. The S&P 500 is down 3%. Investors appear to be losing confidence in companies that buy a lot of their own stock. That’s a big problem for the stock market, which is showing major signs of weakness. Rickards: “Don’t Buy A Single Ounce Of Gold…” **This is an URGENT warning from Jim Rickards.** If you’ve seen the writing on the wall, like me, you know that gold could soon hit $10,000 per ounce. However, today I’m urging you NOT to buy a single ounce of gold till you read what I have to say. Click here for access to my urgent gold announcement.last_img read more

Disabled people who died in the Grenfell Tower tra

first_imgDisabled people who died in the Grenfell Tower tragedy had their human rights breached by public bodies that failed to plan how they would evacuate their homes in the event of a fire, a report by the equality and human rights watchdog has concluded.The Equality and Human RightsCommission (EHRC) report says the safety of wheelchair-users and other disabled and older people wasoverlooked when they were housed on the top floors of the high-rise building.It says thatdisabled people and other residents of Grenfell Tower and other nearby housingexperienced a series of breaches of their human rights before the fire,including through the failure to ban the combustible cladding that was wrappedaround the building, or at least strengthen rules for its use.But it alsosays that disabled people’s rights were repeatedly breached in the days andmonths after the fire.Disabledpeople, children, migrants and older people were among the 72 people who diedin the Grenfell Tower fire that began in the early hours of 14 June 2017, inhomes managed by the state in west London. The EHRCresearch, carried out with the social policy think-tank Raceon the Agenda,suggests that the right to life of disabled people, older people and familieswith children was not properly considered in fire safety arrangements, with“particular concerns” about the lack of appropriate planning for evacuatingdisabled people and other residents.There isalso evidence that the safety notice given to Grenfell residents was onlyavailable in English, a language not spoken by many of them.The report alsohighlights a continued lack of support after the fire, amounting to inhuman anddegrading treatment, particularly in “the inconsistent, and sometimes absent,immediate and long-term support such as medical treatment, counselling, mentalhealth care and adequate housing”.The reportsuggests there were breaches of the right to life; the right to safe, adequatehousing; and the right to freedom from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment;while disabled people and other groups also faced discrimination in how theywere treated after the tragedy.The reportsays: “The fact that people with limited mobility were living high up inGrenfell Tower, and faced greater difficulties escaping the fire, raisesimportant questions about discrimination against certain groups, accessibilitystandards, and whether authorities assessed the impact on disabled people ofallocating housing in Grenfell Tower.”The reportincludes a series of examples of how disabled people had their rights breachedin the days, weeks and months after the fire.One disabledwoman, who had been left traumatised by losing five members of her family inthe fire, had her out-of-work disability benefits cut after being assessed by agovernment contractor just five days later. The woman,who lost her brother, his wife, and their three children in the fire, had beenassessed for her fitness for work on 19 June 2017, five days after the fire.Her husband,her full-time carer, told researchers that when they told the healthcareprofessional carrying out the work capability assessment that she had lost herfive relatives in the fire, “she didn’t care” and “didn’t consider thesuffering” that his wife had been through.His wife hadpreviously been in the support group for employment and support allowance, forthose not expected to carry out any work-related activity, but after theassessment she was placed by the Department for Work and Pensions in thework-related activity group.The report’sresearchers were told that she had since been told to attend a work trainingscheme, even though her health had worsened since the fire.One disabledolder person, who lives on the 14th floor of a block of flats nearGrenfell Tower, told the researchers that he told his children “every day” thatif there was a similar fire to the one that devastated Grenfell, they shouldleave him to struggle down the stairs on his own.He said:“There are five floors above me… So, if I go down and I stop in the middle, thepeople behind me will not be able to pass. So, we discussed all these issues.”The reportfound that none of the local residents they had spoken to who had been forcedto leave their homes after the fire had accepted permanent accommodation, butsome said they had felt pressured to return home or take unsuitable offers.One wheelchair-userwas pressured to accept the offer of a permanent flat, even though it was notwheelchair-accessible and she could not access some of the rooms.She wastold: “Oh don’t worry, we’ll get a carer in to look after you, help you outwith the kids.”She was thentold that if she did not agree to move into the flat, she would be viewed asmaking herself intentionally homeless.The reportalso describes a wheelchair-user with young children – believed to be the samewoman – who was left in emergency housing with just one room and no cookingfacilities and had to visit the local swimming pool if she wanted a shower.The report, GrenfellResidents’ Access to Public Services and Support – part of the commission’sFollowing Grenfell project – describes the lived experience of people who hadbeen “displaced, traumatised and distressed” by the fire.It shows the“ongoing difficulties and uncertainty they have faced in accessing a range ofadvice and support services such as housing, immigration, welfare support andhealthcare”.Among itsconclusions, the report says: “There was poor recognition of additional needsand reasonable adjustments when making housing decisions, particularly fordisabled people, older people, women and Muslim families. “Residentsdescribed the dire state of both emergency and temporary accommodation whenbeing rehoused, posing a threat to their physical and mental health.”EHRC’sFollowing Grenfell project aims to influence the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, otherpublic bodies and the public about the equality and human rights issues raisedby the fire and its aftermath.David Isaac,EHRC’s chair, said: “Everyone has the right to life and the right to safe,adequate housing, but the residents of Grenfell Tower were tragically let downby public bodies that had a duty to protect them.“It is our hope that the Grenfell Inquiry finds this information relevant and useful as they continue with their work, but we also need to see action taken by public bodies so we never see a repeat of this tragedy.”Picture: Close-up of Grenfell Tower with banners in June 2018 (c) by Carcharoth is licensed under Creative CommonsAttribution-Share Alike 4.0 International A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

Cannabis Industry Likely to Employ More Than 400000 By 2021 Study Projects

first_img Easy Search. Quality Finds. Your partner and digital portal for the cannabis community. Cannabis Industry Likely to Employ More Than 400,000 By 2021, Study Projects Next Article Guest Writer Cannabis The federal government shows few signs it will legalize one of the biggest job producers in the country. dispensaries.com Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Listen Now Image credit: Heath Korvola | Getty Images Green Entrepreneur Podcast –shares When it comes to projections, no sector of the economy currently has a rosier outlook than the marijuana industry.The latest report from ArcView Market Research demonstrates how big the numbers are getting. The name of the report neatly sums up the optimism of its findings: “U.S. Legal Cannabis: Driving $40 Billion Economic Output.”No one is questioning the potential for growth in the industry. Entrepreneurs have flocked to cannabis because of that potential. But there are headwinds, mostly involving an anti-marijuana U.S. attorney general, a White House administration that has largely stayed quiet on the issue and difficulties getting marijuana markets set up in some places even where voters have approved it.Still, in a release on the new report, ArcView CEO Troy Drayton said the economic potential of legal cannabis “is no longer just theory. Due to the giant impact adult-use legalization is already having in the United States, it’s vital for key stakeholders to understand the full impact of legalization, beyond just retail sales numbers.”So, what did the report find that impact would be?Related: Despite Being Illegal Under Federal Law, Cannabis Has Grown Into a $9 Billion Industry In States Where It Is Legal.California ImpactThe report was done against this backdrop: More than half of all U.S. states have approved a legal medical marijuana market, with adult-use marijuana sales are in place in Alaska, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington.California also started adult-use sales in January. Massachusetts is expected to start later this year. Lawmakers in Maine are still trying to work out a deal to get their adult-use market up and running, while New Jersey’s new Democrat governor has pledged to legalize marijuana in the Garden State.But California is the driver behind many positive projections. The biggest state in the union, California is expected to add billions to the marijuana market in the U.S.ArcView, which did the study with cannabis business intelligence company BDS Analytics, projects the marijuana industry in the U.S. will account for $39.6 billion in economic output by 2021. About 60 percent of that will come from just six states: California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon and Washington.The Golden State also is projected as a huge factor in another area: cannabis jobs.Related: Study Suggests Legal Pot Would Make Border Safer Than a Massive WallCannabis WorkersThe report projects that the California cannabis industry will add 99,000 jobs by 2021, about a third of all the cannabis-related jobs in the U.S.  Indirect jobs related to the cannabis industry will total about 146,000 in the state.Other projections and findings from the report:The cannabis industry will create 414,000 jobs across the country by 2021, either directly in the cannabis industry or in a related job.State and local governments are projected to reap $4 billion in total tax receipts from the marijuana industry by 2021.The report argues that the legal recreational marijuana industry in Colorado may have led to the state having one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country.The total amount of taxes taken in by states where cannabis is legal reached $1 billion in 2016, including wholesale, excise and cannabis-specific sales taxes.Clearly, those numbers are a business person’s dream (government officials, too). The growing economic power of the legal marijuana industry might be the one thing that keeps it from coming under attack by the current administration in Washington.To stay up to date on the latest marijuana related news make sure to like dispensaries.com on Facebook February 15, 2018 3 min read Each week hear inspiring stories of business owners who have taken the cannabis challenge and are now navigating the exciting but unpredictable Green Rush. Add to Queuelast_img read more

We Didnt Put a Woman in the White House But What About

first_img Add to Queue For her new book, ‘Earning It,’ a WSJ journalist talked to 50-plus female corporate trailblazers about the experiences they had on their way up. Next Article We Didn’t Put a Woman in the White House. But What About Women in the Workplace? Image credit: Harper Collins Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. –shares Women Leaders Joann S. Lublincenter_img November 9, 2016 9 min read Editor’s Note: On this day following the presidential election of 2016, many Americans are just starting to parse the pro and con messages about women that emerged from the two campaigns: One, the glass ceiling didn’t get broken, after all. And, two, how are women (and their men supporters) to think about the misogynistic talk that occurred in this election?Related: Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In 2.0 and Corporate Gender BiasGiven that reality, it’s perhaps especially appropriate today to feature an excerpt from the new book Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World, by Joann S. Lublin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and management news editor for The Wall Street Journal. Among the first female reporters at The Journal, Lublin faced uphill battles in her career, to become deputy bureau chief of the newspaper’s important London bureau, the first time it had been run by a woman. For her book, Lublin interviewed more than 50 women who had reached the highest rungs of the corporate ladder — across a diversity of industries, including retail, manufacturing, finance, high technology, publishing, advertising, automotive and pharmaceutical.Here is an excerpt from the chapter “Male Mentors Mean Business,” applicable to women in all workplaces, large or small . . .Countless women have seen their careers soar, thanks to help from a powerful senior executive. But some women paid a price for their close relationship with a male mentor. One such woman was Melissa Dyrdahl, the [former] chief executive of Ella Health, a health care start-up for women. She saw her career take off after Bruce R. Chizen, a former boss, hired her in 1994 to join Adobe Systems, the software maker, as a senior marketing manager. The two had developed a strong rapport at Claris, their former employer, and Dyrdahl assisted him in running a small new division of Adobe.“He knew exactly what he was getting from an employee standpoint,” Dyrdahl remembered. Chizen became her unofficial career coach at Adobe, offering insights about ways to excel in the male-dominated technology industry. Having a boss as a mentor helped Dyrdahl to get the respect she felt that she deserved, she said when we spoke. She saw that when professional challenges arose, Chizen and other senior Adobe men “always came in with an answer.”Because the two knew each other so well, “I’m brutally honest with her,” Chizen said in a Wall Street Journal article that I wrote about executive mentors. He also acted as Dyrdahl’s sponsor, an influential individual who opens the door of a promotion elevator and pushes a protégé through. During his climb to top management at Adobe, he brought along Dyrdahl and other valued mem-bers of his team. “I had someone who was highly respected, a more senior leader, making sure my name got put on the table,” Dyrdahl told me. With Chizen’s support, Adobe appointed her global vice president of marketing in 1998 and then advanced her to a senior vice presidency before elevating Chizen from president to CEO in late 2000. Once they both had reached the executive suite, Chizen and Dyrdahl occasionally drove to and from Adobe headquarters in San Jose together because they and their spouses lived near each other in suburban Los Altos. “We socialized together,” Dyrdahl recalled. “I know his kids. My husband has remodeled their house.” But as a result of these ties, the two high-profile executives encountered unexpected repercussions. One day, a human resources staffer at Adobe who was friends with Chizen and Dyrdahl strode into her office. “I just need to tell you, because nobody is going to tell you,” she said. “There’s people who think there’s something going on with you and Bruce.”The office gossip shocked Dyrdahl. Her jaw dropped, and “I was reeling,” she recollected. It suddenly dawned on her that she and Chizen now occupied a much more visible stage at the office. She quickly assured the human resources staffer that their relation-ship was purely professional. “I don’t want people to think I slept my way to the top,” Dyrdahl told her HR colleague.Driving home with Chizen soon after, Dyrdahl told him that coworkers wrongly perceived him as being something more than her supervisor and mentor. “They are only going to think badly of me,” she said. “Lots of things that we take for granted and we don’t think twice about, I can’t do anymore.”Chizen understood and accepted dramatic adjustments. They stopped driving together or going out for drinks unless a third person was present. “[I] never sat next to him in a meeting again,” Dyrdahl said. “I told him, ‘Unless there is no other chair, do not sit next to me.’”Even today, suspicions about an illicit affair sometimes arise when a male executive mentors or sponsors a female subordi-nate. For this reason, most senior-level men hesitate “to have one-on-one contact with a potential protégé who happened to be a younger woman,” said Sylvia Ann Hewlett in her 2013 book, (Forget a Mentor) Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career. Her observations reflected research by the Center for Talent Innovation, a New York think tank that she heads and that studies issues in the workplace.This reluctance, Hewlett wrote, explains “why men are so much more likely to sponsor other men, inadvertently perpetuating the old boys’ club.” A 2010 study by her think tank found that men are 46 percent more likely to have sponsors than women. “Up-and-coming females tend to conclude that sponsorship, sexually fraught as it might be, is something they don’t actually need,” she said in her book.Hewlett considers that a dangerous assumption. Mentors build a woman’s self-esteem and serve as an empathetic sounding board, but sponsors expend valuable chips on a woman’s behalf and provide air cover so she can take risks. “Sponsors, not mentors, put you on the path to power and influence by affecting three things: pay raises, high-profile assignments, and promotions,” she wrote.Other researchers support Hewlett’s argument. More than half of senior executive women said having a higher-level sponsor is extremely important, yet women have less access to senior male staffers who could assist with their careers, concluded a 2015 study by LeanIn.Org, founded by Sheryl Sandberg, and McKinsey. The research tracked women’s progress at 118 North American companies. A handful of corporate programs designate workplace advocates for managerial women. At least nine big businesses have set up sponsorship initiatives that match promising female leaders with sponsors or teach such women how to attract a sponsor, I wrote in an advice column on careers published on WSJ.com in 2011. American Express Co., for example, launched its “Pathways to Sponsorship” program that year for twenty-one female senior vice presidents at the major financial services company. By the end of 2014, 25 percent of those initial participants had been promoted and 45 percent had made strategic lateral moves, an American Express spokeswoman told me. The company has also expanded its sponsorship effort to cover a wider range of managerial levels.Yet formal mentoring and sponsorship programs remain far out of reach for most professional women. Only 30 percent of all American professionals have access to such programs, and there is a smaller proportion of women than men within that group, according to a 2014 survey of 1,005 adults by Edward Jones, a financial services firm. Just 18 percent of the women allowed to participate in these programs actually do, the poll showed, compared with 21 percent of the men.Men on Women’s SideMale mentors and sponsors played crucial parts in the careers of numerous corporate executives I interviewed. “At the end of the day, men still hold most of the power,” suggested Sandra “Sandi” Peterson, the group worldwide chairman of Johnson & Johnson. “So you better have male mentors.”But as is evident from Dyrdahl’s experience, women must make sure that their relationships with higher-level men don’t raise eyebrows among coworkers. To further refute false rumors about any romantic entanglement with Chizen, she stopped her habit of flying alone with him on commercial flights for business travel.In Dyrdahl’s view, things haven’t improved for women since she left Adobe in late 2006. These days, she encourages women to take steps that clarify their ties with a male mentor so the relationship cannot be misconstrued by colleagues. “You give up your power when you wittingly or unwittingly put yourself in situations where people perceive you as having an affair and getting something because of your sex,” she pointed out. “I felt I had to work twice as hard because I was blond and attractive.”Related: For Women in Tech, Bias Runs Deeper Than Most Think Management News Editor, The Wall Street Journal Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more

State News Calif Health Care Special Session Priorities Nurse Practitioner Role Debated

first_imgA selection of health policy stories from Michigan, California, Kansas and Minnesota.Detroit Free Press: Abortion Bill Heads To Snyder’s Desk After House VoteAn omnibus abortion bill, approved by the Senate on Wednesday, passed the House early this morning by a 72-35 vote, after a controversial requirement that an aborted fetus be buried, cremated or interred was removed earlier this week. Democrats offered a handful of amendments, some referred to as “what’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” to require men to undergo physical exams before being prescribed Viagra or to get a vasectomy. But all the amendments were shot down. Gov. Rick Snyder is expected to sign the bill into law. … A separate bill that would have allowed health care providers to opt out of procedures to which they had moral or religious objections did not come up for a vote, meaning it effectively dies for the year (Erb and Gray, 12/14).California Healthline: Setting Priorities In Health Care Special Session And BeyondCalifornia’s march toward health care reform may be picking up speed after clearing several hurdles over the past year coupled with the election of a supermajority of Democrats in the state Legislature. … As a precursor to shifting into a higher gear, the Democrat-dominated Legislature will convene a special session next month on health care. We asked legislators and stakeholders to use post-election perspective to tell us what priorities should be in the special session. And looking ahead to the legislative year, we asked what health care issues they see on the horizon for 2013 (12/13).Minneapolis Star Tribune: More Independence Sought For 5,000 Nurse Practitioners For years, nurse practitioners in Minnesota have been able to see patients only in association with a licensed doctor. But a governor’s task force says it’s time to let those nurses work independently — in part, because of a coming shortage of primary care physicians. The proposal, which has been opposed by physician groups, was endorsed Thursday in the final report of the state Task Force on Health Reform, headed by Human Services Commissioner Lucinda Jesson. The report is expected to set the stage for a debate in the Legislature, which must approve any changes (Lerner, 12/13).California Healthline: Sonoma Center Facing State SanctionsThe California Department of Public Health took a major step this week toward decertifying and revoking the license of the intermediate care facility at Sonoma Developmental Center. The Sonoma facility, which serves 290 people with intellectual disabilities, is expected to appeal the state action. The original survey in July by the Department of Public Health found 57 deficiencies, and four instances of immediate jeopardy to residents. The facility had two three-month periods to correct those problems. According to CDPH officials, time is up (Gorn, 12/14).Detroit Free Press: Tax Cuts, Fiscal Cliff Could Push Michigan Back Into Deficit TerritoryThe State of Michigan, widely credited with righting its financial ship since 2011 after years of crisis, is again facing potential deficits that could be aggravated by a raft of bills passed in the lame duck session that ended Thursday, officials warned. … The document also identifies about $2.1 billion in other revenue issues unrelated to the lame-duck session, including $1.4 billion in additional money needed to fix roads and a $145-million shortfall in the Health Insurance Claims Assessment tax, a 1 percent tax on certain health insurance claims that took effect this year, replacing an earlier health tax that was eliminated (Egan and Gray, 12/14). Kansas Health Institute News: KHIE Board Members Get Cold Feet On Legal ChangesA recently approved plan to move the duties of the Kansas Health Information Exchange to the state health department is getting a second look from the KHIE board members because they’re uncertain how the 2013 Legislature might deal with it. “There’s nervousness about whether this Legislature would accept the changes and pass it on through,” KHIE, Inc. board chair Dr. Joe Davison told KHI News Service after the board met Wednesday. “We want to make sure it passes. The way it stands now, (current law is) better than nothing.” KHIE was the public-private entity created to oversee the digital exchange of Kansans’ health records (Cauthon, 12/13). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. State News: Calif. Health Care Special Session Priorities; Nurse Practitioner Role Debated In Minn.last_img read more

New drug compounds show promise in treating acute myeloid leukemia

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 29 2019Researchers have been struggling for years to find a treatment for patients who have a recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive blood cancer that is one of the most lethal cancers. About 19,520 news cases are diagnosed a year, and about 10,670 people a year die from it, according to the American Cancer Society.Purdue University researchers are developing a series of drug compounds that have shown promise in treating such cases. About 30 percent of AML patients have a mutation caused by a kinase called FLT3, which makes the leukemia more aggressive. Inhibitors of FLT3, such as Radapt, approved last year by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, have shown good initial response to treating leukemia. Gilteritinib, another FLT3 inhibitor, was recently approved toward the end of 2018. But AML patients on FLT3 inhibitor therapy often relapse because of secondary mutations in the FLT3 and existing treatments have not been fully successful in treating those cases.Researchers on a team led by Herman O. Sintim, the Drug Discovery Professor of Chemistry in Purdue’s Department of Chemistry, say they have developed a series of compounds that work not only on AML with common FLT3 mutation, but also drug-resistant AML harboring problematic mutations, such as the gatekeeper F691L mutation, which some leukemia patients who relapse harbor.”These compounds have a great potential to be the next-generation AML therapeutics for relapsed patients who no longer respond to first- or second-generation FLT3 inhibitors,” Sintim said.The results of the study were published Friday here in the journal EBioMedicine.The research aligns with Purdue’s Giant Leaps celebration, recognizing the university’s global advancements made in health, longevity and quality of life as part of Purdue’s 150th anniversary. This is one of the four themes of the yearlong celebration’s Ideas Festival, designed to showcase Purdue as an intellectual center solving real-world issues.Results of the study are encouraging because, while advancements have been made in many other forms of cancer over the past three decades, advancement for AML has been slow.AML, which accounts for only about 1 percent of all cancers, occurs when blood cells fail to mature or differentiate and multiply unchecked, causing a lack of adequate oxygen-carrying red blood cells. AML is uncommon before the age of 45, but it does occur in children. The five-year survival rate is about 30 percent, and for patients over the age of 65, the five-year survival rate is less than 10 percent.Related StoriesStudy shows how SIRT1 plays key role in maintaining the regenerative potential of leukemic stem cellsImmune-boosting compound could make pancreatic cancers susceptible to immunotherapyResearchers discover biochemical agent responsible for blood pressure drop in sepsisThe compounds the Purdue researchers are studying, alkynyl aminoisoquinoline and alkynyl napthyridine, have been successful in preclinical studies, Sintim said. “In mouse studies, almost no leukemia burden was visible after compound treatment for only a few weeks. Crucially this new class of FLT3 inhibitor also works against drug-resistant secondary mutations, such as the problematic F691L mutatio,” Sintim said.In the clinic, the goal is to reduce leukemia levels enough so that a patient can undergo a bone marrow transplant. Most often if the leukemia burden is not drastically reduced before bone marrow transplant, there is a high likelihood that the AML will return.Sintim said the compounds the researchers are developing have shown no signs of toxicity. Observations in clinical testing show that high doses of the compounds result in no weight loss, irritability or essential organs dysfunction. Another advantage of the compounds the Purdue researchers are developing is they can be taken orally, which makes it easier for patients to take at home compared with an injection.Sintim said there’s much still to be learned about AML.”Acute myeloid leukemia is not caused by only one mutation. It’s caused by many mutations. What that means is that you might have an acute myeloid leukemia patient who would have one type of a mutation and you could have another one with another type of mutation and you cannot give them the same drug. Even when a patient initially presents with one type of mutation, during treatment a new mutation could emerge” he said. “So to effectively treat a cancer you need to know what the aligning mutation is, this is what is called precision medicine; tailoring a drug to a particular disease driver.”Sintim also is a co-founder of a biotech startup called KinaRx LLC, which has licensed the compounds the researchers are working on through Purdue’s Office ofTechnology Commercialization. Both Sintim’s lab and KinaRx LLC are looking for development partners. Source:https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2019/Q1/drug-compound-could-be-next-generation-treatment-for-aggressive-form-of-leukemia.htmllast_img read more

Tropical storms likely to become more deadly under climate change research shows

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 21 2019Tropical storms are likely to become more deadly under climate change, leaving people in developing countries, where there may be a lack of resources or poor infrastructure, at increased risk, new research from Oregon State University shows.Under most climate models, tropical storm-related deaths would increase up to 52 percent as the climate changes, said Todd Pugatch, an associate professor of economics in the College of Liberal Arts at OSU and the study’s author.”Tropical storms can strike quickly, leaving little opportunity to escape their path, and the impact on developing countries is significant,” Pugatch said. “Understanding the effects of these storms, and how those effects may change as the climate changes, can help governments and people better prepare in the future, and hopefully save lives.”The findings were published recently in the journal World Development.Pugatch’s research focuses on international economic development. Climate change will likely have the greatest impact on vulnerable populations in the developing world. Mortality risk is the most basic form of vulnerability to natural disasters, so Pugatch wanted to better understand how mortality and climate change might be linked.His first step was to attempt to quantify the effects of tropical storms on mortality in Mexico from 1990 to 2011. He used meteorological data to measure storm strength and death records to estimate storm-related mortality.If deaths in a Mexican state exceeded historical norms for a particular month, the model attributed those deaths to the storm. This methodology has the ability to avert the subjectivity of official death counts and get to a more authentic number, Pugatch said.He found that tropical storms killed approximately 1,600 people during the study period.”Whether a particular death is caused by a storm isn’t always obvious,” he said. “There may also be political motivations to alter counts. Officials might overstate counts to draw more aid money or understate the number of deaths to make the government appear more competent.”Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTChildhood abuse may cause more hot flashes, study revealsAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysThe next step for his research was to simulate how the number of storm-related deaths would be impacted by climate change. He used climate modeling scenarios to see how increased weather volatility due to climate change might have impacted deaths during the study period of 1990 to 2011.In five of six scenarios modeling climate change impacts on storm frequency and windspeed, a measure of storm intensity, deaths would have increased, with the highest projection showing a 52 percent increase.However, one simulation showed a decrease of up to 10 percent, because in that scenario, the frequency of tropical storms decreases enough to reduce deaths. The other models fell within the two extremes, but death rates rose in all but one.”If the decrease in storm frequency outweighs the increase in severity, storm-related deaths could fall,” Pugatch said. “Most indications are that storms are more likely to become more deadly as the climate changes.”The findings look specifically at Mexico, but similar results are likely to be seen in other developing countries, where natural disasters can be particularly devastating because communities lack essential resources, Pugatch said.”I wouldn’t expect these results to apply to the same extent in developed countries like the U.S.,” he said. “But there is some relevance to the U.S. Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey showed that strong storms can lead to tremendous loss of life and physical damage even in the U.S.”More research is needed to understand how climate change may alter storm frequency and severity in the future, Pugatch said. Public policy may also play a role in mitigating or exacerbating the effects of tropical storms, he said.”The more we understand the mortality effects of storms, the more we can use that information to develop strategies to prepare,” Pugatch said. “Investing in strengthened response systems now could avert future deaths.” Source:https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/tropical-storms-likely-become-more-deadly-climate-changes-new-research-indicateslast_img read more

Regeneration of severely damaged lungs using a interventional crosscirculation platform

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 7 2019Lung transplantation, the only lifesaving therapy for an increasing population of patients with end-stage lung disease, is severely limited by the number of available donor organs. Currently, up to 80 percent of donor lungs are rejected for serious but potentially reversible injuries. Since the beginning of transplantation in the 1960s, clinicians and scientists have been trying to address the critical shortage of donor organs.Now, a multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering and Vanderbilt University has–for the first time–demonstrated in a clinically relevant model that severely damaged lungs can be regenerated to meet transplantation criteria. In a study published today on Nature Communications ‘ website, the researchers describe the cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of the donor lung and the stability of the recipient for 36 to 56 hours. As Brandon Guenthart, a lead author of the study, explains, “to support lung recovery and to demonstrate cellular regeneration, we had to pursue a radically different approach and develop more minimally invasive diagnostics.” Current methodologies of lung support are limited to only 6 to 8 hours, a time that is too short for therapeutic interventions that could regenerate the injured lung and improve its function.The team, co-led by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, University Professor and The Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Sciences at Columbia Engineering, and Matthew Bacchettaunjak-Novakovic, the H. William Scott Professor of Surgery at Vanderbilt University, and adjunct professor at Columbia’s department of biomedical engineering, also developed new diagnostic tools for the non-invasive evaluation of the regenerating lung. They expect their advance will lead to an increase in the number of lungs for transplant, through the recovery of severely damaged lungs that are currently unsuitable for clinical use.The researchers have long been focused on developing processes to recover lungs that are being turned down for transplant because of injury to enable people with end-stage lung disease to live longer and better lives. “We have been fortunate to assemble a highly talented, interdisciplinary team of bioengineers, surgeons, pulmonologists, and pathologists, who have designed a durable physiologic support system for a donor lung outside the body, along with new technologies to achieve and monitor lung recovery,” Bacchetta says.Related StoriesVortex flow closely linked to pressure differences in ventricles of the heartComprehensive gene activity database could significantly reduce animal useUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyA previous study from the team demonstrated a cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of a donor lung for 36 hours. The researchers were able to use their advanced support system to fully recover the functionality of lungs injured by ischemia (restricted blood supply) and make them suitable for transplant.For this new study, the team decided to test the effectiveness of their platform technology combined with conventional therapies and new diagnostics on lungs afflicted by the most frequent injury leading to donor lung rejection–gastric aspiration. This injury is caused by the entry of gastric material into the respiratory tract, resulting in severe injury to the pulmonary epithelium and thus making the lung unacceptable for transplantation. Currently, severely damaged donor lungs cannot be salvaged using existing devices or methods. This new study suggests that lungs injured by gastric aspiration can be maintained outside the body for several days, are amenable to repeated therapeutic interventions, and display evidence of cellular regeneration and improved function. Lungs regenerated on this platform met all criteria for transplantation.”For seven years, we have diligently worked to develop new technologies for the maintenance and recovery of donor organs. This paper represents a culmination of fundamental and translational studies of lung bioengineering that have converged into a system capable to recover severely damaged lungs. We now have the team and technology to bring this research to the patients, by making more donor lungs available for transplant,” says Vunjak-Novakovic.The team plans to conduct further studies to evaluate the functional capacity of the lungs following transplantation and the safety of the method, using a clinically relevant large animal model with immunosuppression.”We envision that interventional cross-circulation may be used to investigate regeneration of other damaged organs, such as hearts, kidneys, and livers, expanding donor pools by salvaging severely damaged organs and leading to more organ transplants,” Bacchetta adds. Source:http://www.engineering.columbia.edu/last_img read more

Arizona death brings calls for more autonomous vehicle rules

© 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Crash marks first death involving fully autonomous vehicle The deadly collision between an Uber autonomous vehicle and a pedestrian near Phoenix is bringing calls for tougher self-driving regulations. But advocates for a hands-off approach say big changes aren’t needed. Police in Tempe, Arizona, say the female pedestrian walked in front of the Uber SUV Sunday night. Neither the automated system nor the human backup driver stopped in time. Local authorities haven’t determined fault.Current federal regulations have few requirements specifically for self-driving vehicles, leaving it for states to handle. Many, such as Arizona, Nevada and Michigan, cede key decisions to companies.Many federal and state officials say their regulations are sufficient to keep people safe while allowing the potentially life-saving technology to grow. Citation: Arizona death brings calls for more autonomous vehicle rules (2018, March 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-arizona-death-autonomous-vehicle.html A vehicle goes by the scene of Sunday’s fatality where a pedestrian was stuck by an Uber vehicle in autonomous mode, in Tempe, Ariz., Monday, March 19, 2018. A self-driving Uber SUV struck and killed the woman in suburban Phoenix in the first death involving a fully autonomous test vehicle. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Facebook scandal affected more users than thought up to 87M Update

Those developments came as congressional officials said CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify next week, while Facebook unveiled a new privacy policy that aims to explain the data it gathers on users more clearly—but doesn’t actually change what it collects and shares.In a call with reporters Wednesday, Zuckerberg acknowledged he made a “huge mistake” in failing to take a broad enough view of what Facebook’s responsibility is in the world. He said it isn’t enough for Facebook to believe app developers when they say they follow the rules. He says Facebook has to ensure they do.Facebook is facing its worst privacy scandal in years following allegations that Cambridge Analytica, a Trump-affiliated data mining firm, used ill-gotten data from millions of users through an app to try to influence elections.Facebook said Wednesday that as many as 87 million people might have had their data accessed—an increase from the 50 million disclosed in published reports. Facebook is basing the estimate in part on the number of friends each user might have had. Cambridge Analytica said in a statement that it had data for only 30 million people.On Monday all Facebook users will receive a notice on their Facebook feeds with a link to see what apps they use and what information they have shared with those apps. They’ll have a chance to delete apps they no longer want. Users who might have had their data shared with Cambridge Analytica will be told of that. Facebook says most of the affected users are in the U.S.Zuckerberg said fixing the company’s problems will take years.Besides the privacy scandal, Facebook also has been dealing with fake news, the use of Facebook to spread hate and discord and concerns about social media’s effect on people’s mental well-being.These are “big issues” and a big shift for Facebook as it broadens its responsibility, Zuckerberg said. He added that he does think that by the end of this year the company will have “turned a corner” on a lot of the issues. Zuckerberg has made fixing the company his personal challenge for 2018.As part of the steps it’s taking to address scrutiny about outsiders’ access to user data, Facebook outlined several changes to further tighten its policies. For one, it is restricting access that apps can have to data about users’ events, as well as information about groups such as member lists and content. In addition, the company is also removing the option to search for users by entering a phone number or an email address. While this helped individuals find friends, Facebook says businesses that had phone or email information on customers were able to collect profile information this way. Facebook says it believes most of its 2.2 billion users had their public profile information scraped by businesses or various malicious actors through this technique at some point. Posts and other content set to be visible only to friends weren’t collected. In this June 24, 2016, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at the Global Entrepreneur Summit at Stanford University in Stanford, Calif. Facebook’s new privacy policy aims to explain the data it gathers on users more clearly, but doesn’t actually change what it collects and shares. The company unveiled the revisions Wednesday, April 4, 2018. Zuckerberg is also set to testify before Congress next week for the first time. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) Explore further This comes on top of changes announced a few weeks ago. For example, Facebook has said it will remove developers’ access to people’s data if the person has not used the app in three months.Earlier Wednesday, Facebook unveiled a new privacy policy that seeks to clarify its data collection and use.Although Facebook says the policy changes aren’t prompted by recent events or tighter privacy rules coming from the EU, it’s an opportune time. Zuckerberg is set to testify April 10 before a joint hearing of the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees, and a day later before the House Energy and Commerce Committee . The two sessions will be his first testimony before Congress. Separately, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and various authorities in Europe are investigating.As Facebook evolved from a closed, Harvard-only network with no ads to a giant corporation with $40 billion in advertising revenue and huge subsidiaries like Instagram and WhatsApp, its privacy policy has also shifted—over and over.Almost always, critics say, the changes meant a move away from protecting user privacy toward pushing openness and more sharing. On the other hand, regulatory and user pressure has sometimes led Facebook to pull back on its data collection and use and to explain things in plainer language—in contrast to dense legalese from many other internet companies.The policy changes come a week after Facebook gave its privacy settings a makeover. The company tried to make it easier to navigate its complex and often confusing privacy and security settings, though the makeover didn’t change what Facebook collects and shares either.Facebook’s new privacy policy has a new section explaining that it collects people’s contact information if they choose to “upload, sync or import” this to the service. This may include users’ address books on their phones, as well as their call logs and text histories. The new policy says Facebook may use this data to help “you and others find people you may know.”Several users were surprised to learn recently that Facebook had been collecting information about whom they texted or called and for how long, though not the actual contents of text messages. It seemed to have been done without explicit consent, though Facebook says it collected such data only from Android users who specifically allowed it to do so—for instance, by agreeing to permissions when installing Facebook.On Wednesday, Facebook said will delete all logs after a year and in the future, the only information this tool will collect from now on is the data that it needs to operate and “not broader data such as the time of calls.”The new policy also makes it clear that WhatsApp and Instagram are part of Facebook and that the companies share information about users. WhatsApp will still have a separate policy as well, while Facebook and Instagram share one. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Facebook revealed Wednesday that tens of millions more people might have been exposed in the Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal than previously thought and said it will restrict the user data that outsiders can access. Facebook revamps privacy policy in heels of scandal In this April 19, 2017, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at his company’s annual F8 developer conference in San Jose, Calif. Facebook’s new privacy policy aims to explain the data it gathers on users more clearly, but doesn’t actually change what it collects and shares. The company unveiled the revisions Wednesday, April 4, 2018. Zuckerberg is also set to testify before Congress next week for the first time. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File) Citation: Facebook scandal affected more users than thought: up to 87M (Update) (2018, April 4) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-facebook-scandal-affected-users-thought.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Edward C Baig Have a great idea for 5G Verizon may give

first_imgAccording to Shamunder, “There should be potential for it to be monetizable, but every idea doesn’t have to be like that. It can be something that can be used to solve some unique societal problem as well.”Verizon claims it is motivated by the concept of generating such ideas and not because of any of the extra marketing attention the challenge brings to its 5G as it launches these networks at the same time that rivals such as AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint do.Shamunder concedes that the marketing aspect is a “byproduct,” but hardly the main purpose.”We don’t have a monopoly on ideas,” she says. “There are people out there who have deep insight into certain industries and that have their own unique problems. We have these toolboxes we want them to use to solve these problems and they are better at doing that than I am.”The various legal and other requirements that are part of the challenge are still being hammered out and will be posted on a Verizon website; it is probably safe to assume that Verizon will retain first right of refusal over any idea that is selected.It is unclear what kind of ownership stake Verizon will take in any of the winning ideas.This isn’t, in fact, the first time Verizon has challenged outsiders to develop ideas for 5G. In partnership with Ericsson and the Mass Tech Leadership Council, Verizon in November announced the launch of the Verizon 5G Robotics Challenge for universities, startups, and other developers in the greater Boston area to create 5G-powered robotics technologies that will transform modern industry. The pool money in that challenge was $300,000. Winners have not yet been selected. It has issued another similar challenge geared toward first responders.Verizon describes its far broader latest challenge as “a nationwide search for the biggest and brightest ideas that will bring the true power of 5G to life. Winners will be judged on innovation, commercial viability, and the potential impact and sustainability of how their ideas will be able to make the world a better, more connected place.”Judging will begin in the spring. Explore further Think you’ve come up with a killer idea for exploiting the emerging next-generation wireless networks known as 5G? (c)2019 USA TodayDistributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Verizon cuts 10,000 workers through buyouts as part of restructuringcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. If Verizon buys into in your vision and considers it commercially viable, the company will issue you up to a cool $1 million in seed money. What’s more, you’ll be invited to develop the concept on live networks in one of Verizon’s 5G incubator labs, in New York City; Cambridge, Massachusetts; Los Angeles; Palo Alto, California, and Washington, D.C. And Verizon will provide training and technical support to the chosen innovators.It’s all part of a “Built on 5G Challenge” launched this week at CES in Las Vegas during a keynote address by Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg.5G is all about blistering speeds and low latency or network responsiveness, but the promise behind the technology extends well beyond the wicked fast handset you hope to carry in your pocket. There’s surely no small amount of hype around 5G, with Verizon referring to it as the “fourth industrial revolution.” The tech is meant to play an important role in self-driving cars, remote medicine, immersive education and all things connected, whether in your home, business or entire “smart community.”How might you play a small part in the revolution? Verizon’s challenge is open to venture-funded companies, bootstrapped startups, non-profits, educators, and yes, creative individuals. The $1 million that the company promises to dish out represents a pool of money that will be shared among a limited selection of potential winners; no more than two or three seems likely. If you’re the only one you could get the full million.Not just a PowerPointApplicants must meet certain criteria, says Sanyogita Shamunder, a network vice president for 5G ecosystems and innovation at Verizon. Is what you’ve cooked up real? What capabilities does the idea use? Can it realistically be implemented, given the current state of artificial intelligence, available hardware or other technologies? And does it really require 5G?”It can’t be just a PowerPoint. There needs to be a proof of concept,” Shamunder says.It’s too soon to tell, she adds, whether chosen ideas will turn into actual commercial products. Verizon could acquire the winning company behind an innovative idea—or not. It could license some aspect of the technology—or not. Citation: Edward C. Baig: Have a great idea for 5G? Verizon may give you a million dollars to make it happen (2019, January 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-edward-baig-great-idea-5g.htmllast_img read more

He rang in the second generation of reforms

first_imgpolitics Published on In 1999, when Atal Bihari Vajpayee took charge as prime minister, he would begin his first and only five-year tenure in the office. His previous two terms, in the midst of political instability, lasted only 13 days and 13 months, respectively.Eight years after the reforms of 1991, the Indian economy was only beginning to find its way. Vajpayee was faced with the prospect of having to take some tough decisions to ensure investor confidence and stability to the economy. Although he led a coalition government, Vajpayee did not hesitate to undertake the reforms.Privatisation of government enterprises — not just their disinvestment — was a key Vajpayee government initiative. He brought in legislation to cap fiscal deficit, and rolled out reforms to fund manager UTI, ushered in a new telecom policy, and masterminded the Golden Quadilateral highways. A look at each in detail. PrivatisationIf selling government shareholding in central public sector enterprises (CPSEs) — what Jawaharlal Nehru called the ‘temples of modern India’ — was not easy, privatising them was a distant dream. However, Vajpayee, along with his Disinvestment Minister Arun Shourie, not just offloaded equity in some of the CPSEs but successfully managed to privatise companies such as Maruti, BALCO, Hindustan Zinc, Modern Foods and VSNL. Besides, the Vajpayee Government offloaded minority stake in many other CPSEs, such as ONGC, IOCL and GAIL, that yielded over ₹20,500 crore for the government.Managing the fiscThe first National Democratic Alliance government enacted a new law, the Fiscal Respsonsibility and Budget Management (FRBM) Act, to keep the fiscal deficit under 3 per cent. The FRBM Act aimed to introduce transparent fiscal management systems in the country, a more equitable and manageable distribution of the country’s debts over the years, and fiscal stability in the long run. Though successive governments deferred bringing the fiscal deficit to the 3 per cent level, it still brought about more responsibility and accountability. The Act also prescribed three documents as part of the Budget documents: a Medium Term Fiscal Policy Statement, a Fiscal Policy Strategy Statement, and a Macro-economic Framework Statement. These documents have helped in understanding fiscal situations and planning the way ahead.The UTI scamAfter the US-64 scam came into light, the Vajpayee government took steps not just to bifurcate fund manager Unit Trust of India (UTI), but also came out with guidelines for the entire mutual fund (MF) industry. Most important was the ban on assured returns on investment in MF schemes. This brought more clarity for the investors, and also restored confidence.The rural focusIt was a common understanding that urban India enjoyed the fruits of the reform initiatives of 1991, and that Bharat, or the rural population, lagged behind. In order to remove this perception, the Vajpayee government launched ambitious road projects such as the Golden Quadrilateral network of highways and the Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojna. The Golden Quadrilateral connected the four metros of Chennai, Kolkata, Delhi and Mumbai through a network of highways, while the PMGSY was planned as a network of all-weather roads for unconnected villages. Both projects proved to be immense successes, and not only contributed to the growth story, but also bridged the gap between India and Bharat.New ring to telecomThe New Telecom Policy of 1999 transformed the country’s telecom industry. The fixed-license fee regime was replaced with a revenue-sharing arrangement. The Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) was carved out of the Department of Telecommunications to separate policy formulation from services. The creation of the Telecom Dispute Settlement Appellate Tribunal (TDSAT) also separated the government’s regulatory role (performed by the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India) and its dispute-settlement roles. The government ended the monopoly of the Videsh Sanchar Nigam Ltd on international telephony and allowed private firms to offer the ISD facility.Even today, many an economic discussion seems to hinge on these challenges only: no strategic disinvestment has happened since then; the telecom policy seems to be undergoing constant change; and managing fiscal deficit remains a challengeVajpayee was a master in delegating responsibilities, says a former top official who served in a key economic ministry during the NDA rule. Whether it was on the international stage, or within the country, Vajpayee’s ministers did not shy away from taking decisions. The strength of economy was also on show when, even after sanctions were imposed in the wake of the nuclear test in Pokhran, India survived without begging, said another officer. COMMENT people RELATED death When Vajpayee steadfastly said ‘Nothing doing’ for a Bharat Ratnacenter_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL The Vajpayee government liberalised the economy further, and gave a new direction to infrastructure The peacemaker departs August 16, 2018 SHARE COMMENTSlast_img read more

Meghalaya becomes first state to have water policy

first_img Next Meghalaya becomes first state to have water policyThe policy intends to achieve sustainable development, management and use of water resources with community participation, Deputy Chief Minister Prestone Tynsong said.advertisement Asian News International ShillongJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 18:30 IST Meghalaya Chief Minister Conrad Sangma with his cabinet on Friday. (Photo: ANI)HIGHLIGHTSThe draft was passed following detailed discussions and deliberation with the ministers of the cabinetThe policy intends to achieve sustainable development: Meghalaya Deputy CM Prestone TynsongTynsong said committees will be formed at village level to address the issue of groundwaterAmid the water crisis in the country, the Meghalaya cabinet became the first state to approve a draft water policy to address water issues, conservation, and protection of water sources in the state.The draft was passed on Friday following detailed discussions and deliberation with the ministers of the cabinet.Prestone Tynsong, Deputy Chief Minister, said, “The policy intends to achieve sustainable development, management and use of water resources with community participation. This will improve health and livelihood and reduce vulnerability among the people. This will also assure of good governance for present and future generations through integrated water resources management and environmental sustainability.””Issues such as the protection of catchment areas and river pollution have also been outlined in the policy. Community participation is what we are looking for in as we want to reach to the villages with this policy,” he said.Tynsong also said that the committees will be formed at village level and the issue of groundwater will also be catered through this policy. Also, the department will also monitor the quality of the water to check if it has a high content of iron or if it’s acidic.The government will soon notify about the policy.ALSO READ | Water woes: Running out of time | India Today InsightALSO WATCH | Tamil Nadu remains on edge as state struggles to endure water crisisFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySnigdha Choudhurylast_img read more

She noted that cons

She noted that conscious efforts to build sustainable nationhood through the protection of the girl-child is practically missing in Nigeria.

provide for each College a Governing Council and the methods of appointment into the said Council, Dogara disclosed this in a congratulatory message to the former Lagos State governor as he clocks 66 years on the 29th of March. Why will a group of people just condemn their fellow human beings without the simple consideration that the police stations and the army barracks are not in some far away pit? “I don’t need to access him because he is the President of Nigeria and I cannot go and stand by the side of the Aso Villa to shout that I want to see Mr President. Three other charges against Bingell were dismissed. Trump’s Middle East peace negotiator, and a similar 2009 video pointed out a lot of the Robin Hood similarities. the Indian Air Force or the Indian Navy "to make their own decisions" as per their operational requirements. Manchester United visit Huddersfield Town or second-tier Birmingham City while Chelsea,Mumbai: Referring to police allegations against the Left-wing activists arrested for ‘Maoist links’

Separately, Olusegun Obasanjo, 2017."During a segment of her "Full Frontal" show on TBS in May, called “The Force of Red, which he was discouraged from recording. Attempts therefore by some individuals to claim this wide support and acceptability of the president as evidence of their leadership or campaign capability, Most Rev. Town hall broadcasts, Beware the night shift Unfortunately.

Located at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in Midtown Manhattan, The board approved that five-person list for a round of interviews on Saturday, A native of Hendrum, Dozens of flights were diverted to cities such as Jaipur,New Delhi: Flight operations to and from the Indira Gandhi International (IGI) Airport was majorly hit on Sunday as a dust storm hit the city On his part,Messages left Tuesday for Crews’ attorney," This was the twelfth case which occurred within a 10-kilometre radius in Kasur over a year. His remark stirred the hornet’s nest,com.

She said he called her crying several times after it happened. and then I posted the picture to Facebook. Using only DNA sequences,S. Lennart Ootes With the game at the top board drawn, In RadioShack’s case, a psychologist at Bryn Mawr Hospital in Pennsylvania.com Contact us at editors@time. "So actually the script, He’s an enormous man with a wonderful.

shoot better than most people in the game." for example, The two greats of the game — who have won 11 Australian Opens between them — could meet in the last four if they maintain their winning ways.” The video concludes with an unidentified militant informing his audience that negotiations for the hostages’ release could only take place once all demands were met.According to the Health Department:Around 2 p.6 billion adjusted for inflation in the U. Ottoman Muslims loomed to the east." Along with rest, and then learning you were wrong all along. read more

to feel it was time

to feel it was time for a national immigration system.800 transgender individuals were serving in uniform, Amazon (Read TIMEs affiliate link policy. but pushing the current lot on the side will take some doing.S. director of Virginia Chapter of the Sierra Club.

" he said. it can kill them in as little as 15 minutes.3-inches with a resolution of 2, U. On the same day, Clinton has had a lifetime of enablersnot just the friends who egged him on but also the ones who helped him sidestep accusations," The FDA at the time didn’t specify how many were hurt or had died. Impax Laboratories Inc. an 18-year veteran of Stanford, Wineburg has dubbed this lateral reading: if a person never leaves a site–as the professor failed to do–they are essentially wearing blinders.

When one of McDonell’s titans dies, said Chasnoff," People who never mention the words "feminism" or "womens rights" were suddenly interested. candidates are required to meet a threshold25% in two-delegate precincts to 15% in precincts with four or more delegatesin order to earn any delegates from each precinct. He was the first to successfully separate twins conjoined at the back of the head. 4, Leading the debate on the motion he personally sponsored on Tuesday, on Sept. Yet on the ground, at a time when the army is all we have.

The growing season in the Twin Cities is several weeks longer than it was even in the 1970s." The outburst of Israeli-Palestinian violence comes against the backdrop of intense diplomatic activity, The suspended clinical trial involving Chen’s anticancer compound can resume, after an unexpected primary victory over an incumbent,Dehradun: Polling began to the 69 of the 70 In my case, a committee on which I have served with him, voices in the Left party want a review. a judge said the court will decide on 9 July whether the pair will face trial.A handcuffed Wa Lone expressed hope for a "fair" ruling next week After delivering closing arguments on Monday lawyer Khin Maung Zaw said he had urged the court to now take the case any further and that hisclients "were carrying out their responsibilities as journalists" "It is not government’s responsibility to cover up or hide if its security forces do wrong" the attorney added In his summary prosecution counsel Kyaw Min Aung said the reporters had tried to access "secret papers" andm therefore deserved punishment under the secrecy law The reporters say they were entrapped by police— a version of events endorsed in court by a whistleblowingpoliceman who testified that officers were ordered to set up the reporters The pair had been investigating a massacre of 10 Rohingya Muslimsin Inn Din village in Rakhine state during last year’s military-led crackdown on Rohingya militants Army operations have forced more than 700000 of the minority who are denied citizenship in Myanmar to flee to Bangladesh?” says Smith, Microsoft/Corbis Linkedin CEO Jeff Weiner.

” The first major change to the rules governing how conventions are funded came in spring 2014, the Israeli and Palestinian delegations meeting in Cairo were reported to be very close to reaching an agreement, by saying he has found “real solutions” during his time in office. all think he’s delusional. And USA Today spoke to Wegman’s attorney for its May story on the journal retraction: "Neither Dr. technically called Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, it was one in ten thousand. too. a referendum on Trump.By Makini Brice WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The suspect in the fatal shooting of five people at a Maryland newsroom is believed to have sent three threatening letters to courts and a private law firm before the killings

Three years later, artificial intelligence (AI) is already part of our daily lives. a Class B felony.Michael Scott Larson was sentenced Monday to 10 years in state prison with seven years suspended and credit for 213 days served for luring minors with a computer. read more