Tony Becca | And now, a new technical director

first_img CAPTAIN TAYLOR Speaking of coaches, Jamaica is in need of coaches, good coaches, and quickly at that. Good coaches make good cricketers, sometimes they turn good cricketers into great cricketers, and good and great cricketers make good and great teams. At present, Jamaica has some good coaches – Robert Samuels, Terrence Corke and Odelmo Peters, to name a few – but more are needed, and many more at that. Jamaica’s cricket needs more coaches to match the numbers in football, more so, the numbers and the quality of those in track and field, and thank God, two good ones are now available. One who is currently available is Andre Coley, the former Kingston College, Kingston Club, Lucas, Jamaica Youth, West Indies Youth, and Jamaica wicketkeeper. Coley recently worked as an assistant coach on the West Indies team for a few years, but he is back home and ready to work in Jamaica. The other one is Robert Haynes, the former Kingston College, Lucas Club, Kensington Club, Jamaica Youth, West Indies Youth, Jamaica, and West Indies ODI right-arm leg-spinner, and the man who narrowly missed representing the West Indies in Test matches. It would be a good move to get them on the Jamaica Cricket Association’s team of coaches, where they could better serve Jamaica’s cricket well. COLEY AND HAYNES It is said that good things come to those who wait, and thankfully, something good has come to West Indies cricket, courtesy of president Dave Cameron. The new technical director of West Indies cricket is a West Indian, and he is none other than Jimmy Adams, the former Jamaica and West Indies left-handed batsman, part-time left-arm spinner, and part-time wicketkeeper who also served as captain. The man, who, after his first 12 Test matches, boasted a better average than the legendary Don Bradman, is also a member of the ICC’s World Cricket Committee and a former president of the FICA, the Federation of International Cricketers Association. After marking time for a long time, during which Englishman Richard Pybus sat in the position, the West Indies Cricket Board finally saw the wisdom of having one of their own in this most important position in their fight to get the West Indies back to the top of world cricket. And they could not have made a better choice. Adams is a good man, he was a good cricketer, and one who played with some good and great cricketers. He is bright, he was a student of the game before, during, and after his playing days, he broadened his knowledge of the game as coach of Jamaica and of country club Kent, and most important of all, he possesses a passion second to none for the development of the game. As one who has been through been there and done it all, mainly through hard work and dedication as against what is glibly called ‘natural talent’, he is also a natural fit for the job. On top of all that, Adams possesses the kind of personality, and the integrity, which make him ideal for the job, the job of working with and dealing with the West Indian people and their insularity. If anyone can do it, Adams seems to be the one. A round of applause for the West Indies Cricket Board for seeing the light and taking Adams on board as the technical director, even though they apparently have also employed Australian Stuart Law as the West Indies cricket coach. That move is a negative one following the replacement of Bennett King, another Australian, with Phil Simmons and then the firing of Simmons some months ago. It reminds me of the popular saying about the cow kicking over the pail of milk. The West Indies were once the best cricket team in the world, and arguably the best ever in the world, and the West Indies must have produced a few good coaches over the years. Simmons was and is a good coach, and his only mistake was that he mixed up the job as coach and that of a selector, or as the selector, and a very talkative one at that. It is, however, infra dig, or at least it appears so, to turn to an Australian, or an Englishman, or to anyone but a West Indian to solve the problem of West Indies cricket in this day and age. Congrats to Jamaica’s women’s cricket captain and to the winning West Indies women’s World Cup captain, Staphanie Taylor, who has been named captain of the Women’s Team of the Year by the International Cricket Council. This is the first year that the award has been made in women’s cricket. The team, which was named for the period September 2015 to September 2016, includes two West Indians, three New Zealanders, two Australians, two English, one Indian, and one South African. The team, which was named in batting order, has Taylor coming in at number four and Deandra Dottin, also of the West Indies, batting at number eight. New Zealand’s Suzzie Bates, who was named to bat at number one, was named the ODI and T20 Player of the Year. Bates, who won the ODI award in 2013, was the first player to win both awards. In ODI matches, she totalled 472 runs for an average of 94.90 per innings and took eight wickets at an economy rate of 3.75 runs over, and in T29 cricket, Bates scored 429 runs with four fifties at an average of 42.90 per innings.last_img read more

After The Webinar: A Vlog from the Early Intervention Team

first_imgWatch as the MFLN FD Early Intervention team discusses a resource from their recent webinar on August 6, 2015. You can access the webinar recording and additional resources, here.Transcript:“Hi everyone my name is Kimberly Hile and I am with the Family Development Early Intervention team and I was also one of the presenters for last week’s webinar that we put on, Promoting Positive Relationships.So one of the conversations that we had during the webinar was based on this resource that’s on the additional resource list that we shared with you, What Grown-Ups Understand About Child Development. And what came out of this was that a lot of adults don’t understand that young children as young as four months can demonstrate some symptoms of depression. So we talked about that and had a great question from one of our participants about what some of those symptoms might look like, how might a child display that they are suffering from depression.So we talked about how some of those might be exhibiting withdrawal symptoms, so perhaps not wanting to be as interactive with their caregiver as they once were. Perhaps there could be some disruptions with eating or with sleeping. So perhaps a child who was sleeping through the night is now up frequently. Some things like that. We just wanted to share that a little bit and again point back to this resource. It’s got some really good information that I think you would like to pick through.For those of you who did participate in the webinar last week we want to say thank you again. For those of you that weren’t able to on that date, the recording is up on the website so please feel free to go and watch that. And depending on what state you live in you might even be able to get some credit for that for your credentialing or your licensure.So again we want to thank you for your support. If you have any questions that you would like us to cover, please feel free to go to the website, where there’s a place you can type those in and we’ll respond as we can. Also, don’t forget to check out our Facebook site, our Twitter site, there are lots of other blogs and resources so we really want to make sure we’re getting you the information that you need. Thanks again we really appreciate your support.”This video content belongs to the Military Families Learning Network Family Development Early Intervention team.This post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more