JC emphasis on Manning Cup

first_imgLooking back at last year’s schoolboy football season, Jamaica College (JC) re-emphasised its imprint on the competition by taking three successive Manning Cup titles. This is a distinction only once achieved in history.This columnist declares interest in that the previous occasion was the 1961, 1962, 1963 trot, started in his final year of a school which churned out three of the nation’s heads of state.Going into the final against perennial arch-rivals St George’s College was a challenge on mammoth proportions. The Jesuit school had rolled over the team from Old Hope Road in the Super Cup final, four goals to nil. In certain quarters, it was seen as humiliating.Take it as you choose, it was a tutorial in basic execution of brilliance, put on by coach Neville ‘Bertis’ Bell-inspired boys in the lighter shade of blue.Coach Miguel Coley, in charge of the JC unit, had been distracted by national duties. However, there were going to be no excuses accepted in-house for that temporary break in his substantive role. The Catholics had to be turned back if a tradition of triumph was to be sustained.In an address to Old Boys’ recently, chief architect in the JC sporting structure and corporate giant, Ian Forbes, summed it up. Himself an old boy, he called the eventual, trophy-deciding one-nil performance as a message to the country.FIGHTING RIVALS”Whether in the classrooms, on the playing fields or in the corporate boardrooms, private or public sector, we must take the fight to our opposing rivals and not let them roll over or conquer us, no matter how frightening the task may be.”Call it late, as the track and field season has started and thoughts are on this Olympic Year. But it was inevitable that Foster’s Fairplay would, at some time, look back at that 4-0, crafted to put the boys from Hope in their place. As to how the comeback to take the Manning Cup, was orchestrated and executed, occupies this column, this week.Enter the passion, belief and commitment of coach Coley. Here was a man steeped in a sporting culture that saw him, at the youthful age of 17, playing basketball, cricket, volleyball, football and doing long jump at Intercol, while attending Mico Teachers College. In 2004, he was named Athlete of the Year. On the soccer field, he “had dreams of one day playing for Manchester United”.Armed with a degree in sports education and a diploma in English and physical education, he had understudied coaching exemplars in Barry Watson (Mile Gully High) and Alrick Clarke (Norman Manley High, where he coupled with teaching duties). Coley referred to Clarke in glowing terms.”I believe coach Clarke was (my) early mentor as he took me to assist him everywhere he coached.”It was in this period that the JC call had come. Given the resultant impact as he became absorbed in the Old Hope Road programme, it would be simple to merely say, ‘and the rest is history’.However, story of the 2015 ‘rise from the ashes’, 1-0, to turn back the St George’s College march, to greater glory, must be told.Coley reminisced. “The four-nil was a catastrophe. It was a tough night. I hadn’t slept based on what took place between Jamaica and Panama (a Reggae Boyz loss). I knew it would be a difficult game, but we were too open and we played right in the hands of a philosophy of outscoring your opponent, as the entire statistic favoured JC except the goal column.”SOUL SEARCHINGHe underwent a period of introspection. He described it as a time to “soul search, dig deep and become stronger as a man”. His confidence never waned.”I was happy that I had time to work with my players before the next game, and I knew things would be way different. But congrats to St George’s, they did what they had to do.”In order to “move from a four-nil”, he took full responsibility. So, “it’s not you, it’s me”, that was what was important.”What was good was that my management staff and school administration had so much belief in my ability to turn things around, and their support intensified. This was the moment for me to see champions brush themselves up and rise with pride.”Therein lay the passion that brought the turnaround. Coley ended the discourse on a special note.”We are one … Fervet family. Teamwork makes the dream work.”last_img read more

Abraham Sheriff, Author at Age 19

first_img19-year-old Author Abraham Soko Sheriff poses with his book at the launch program.Liberian high school student makes historyBy Samuel G. Dweh/freelance journalist (0886618906/0776583266/samuelosophy@yahoo.com)At the launch of his book, “THE HEART OF A STRANGER IN THE MARKET PLACE”, Abraham Soko Sheriff, born on July 20, 1998, started with his refugee background in Ghana. ”I lived in a ghetto with my parents on the Buduburam refugee camp,” he announced to an audience made up of his siblings, former classmates, former teachers, friends, and other invited guests. The number of guests was less than 70, and majority of the seats empty.The venue was the Multi-Purpose Hall of the Noah’s Ark High School, Town Hall Community, Barnesville, outside of Monrovia on Wednesday, June 13, 2018.Most of the Author’s comments were motivational, directed at the young people in the hall.“If Abraham Sheriff, who had lived in the ghetto, can achieve with publishing a book, you, too, can achieve your respective dreams,” the former Speaker and Vice President of the Student Union Government of the Noah’s Ark High School’s Press Club said.The former student of the Europa Johnson Foundation Nursery School, in Barnesville, derided Liberians for leaving writing of the ‘Liberian story’ in the hands of foreigners. “How long will we allow foreigners to write our books?”He said young Liberians have the desire to write, but “the platform has not been created,” he observed.Speaking earlier, the Guest Speaker, Rev. Robert W. Duo, II, said transmission of one’s imagination into written form is the most difficult task. “By doing this, Abraham Soko Sheriff has crossed the bridge of intellectual barriers,” he said.He likened human mind to a satellite that collects signals from various places. “Abraham Sheriff’s mind collected signals from the imaginary world, which he documented in his book,” he said.He compared Liberia with Ghana in terms of regularity of production of books by citizens. “In Ghana on visit, I saw books by Ghanaian writers surplus on the market. The opposite is in Liberia.”He advised aspiring writers to arrest flying ideas by writing them down on a sheet.The review of the book was done by Samuel Harmon, in his mid-twenties.He said the ‘market place’, in the title of the book, means ‘strange place’, and that the plot of the book alludes to colonialism of Africa by foreign imperialists who stormed the ‘foreign place’ to plunder the natural resources of the people. “The story’s characters killed represented African leaders who opposed colonialism, like Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana,” he said.The author’s teacher at the nursery level at the Europa Johnson Foundation Nursery School said the nineteen-year-old has brought pride to his Alma Mata.“The definition of Visionary fits Abraham Soko Sheriff,” said Mr. Augustus B. Abayomi-Cole, the author’s Nursery education teacher, who is also the Founder/Principal of the School, said.  “Visionary means somebody with strong ideas about how things can be improved.”He spoke on the topic, “The Visionary and the Vision”The president of the Liberia Association of Writers (LAW), Samuel G. Dweh, also a one-time refugee in Ghana, encouraged the author to keep writing and challenged other young people in the audience to emulate what the 19-year-old had done with his talent.“I produced and launched my first novel, The Dyed Star, about our country’s civil war, when I was in high school in Nigeria,” Dweh told the audience. “Now, I have five books to my name.”Mr. Mark Keshen, senatorial candidate for Montserrado County’s Senatorial By-Election, represented by Journalist Cholo Brooks, former BBC correspondent, pledged printing of 10,000 copies of THE HEART OF A STRANGER IN THE MARKET PLACE.The major protagonist of the book is Bileyamah, who stands in the way of the ‘stranger’ (Ferton Togba) in collaboration with a foreigners (Misters Johnson and Tennison) who want to control Willedon, the native people’s home (Kingdom)Little, Tennison succeeds in brainwashing King that that he can develop the Kingdom to be economically and political superior above other Kingdoms. But his plan is to overthrow the King and rule Willidon.To succeed in their wicked plan, he has to first remove       from their path Darnell, who knows have knowledge about his scheme of ruling the land.Read the rest of author Abraham Soko Sheriff’s details in THE HEART OF A STRANGER IN THE MARKET PLACE.The book is not stainless in terms of grammatical errors. The author noted that during his speech.Majority of those who officiated in the launch of THE HEART OF A STRANGER IN THE MARKET PLACE were young people between the ages of 17 and 26.One of them was Ma Tenneh Sheriff, the author’s biological junior sister, who gave a brief history of the author.The author is a native of Grand Cape Mount County.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more