LeBron ‘humbled’ to join Lakers, expects ‘something special’

first_imgLos Angeles Lakers’ LeBron James fields questions during media day at the NBA basketball team’s practice facility Monday, Sept. 24, 2018, in El Segundo, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)EL SEGUNDO, Calif. — LeBron James realizes the size of the challenge he accepted when he joined the Los Angeles Lakers. After eight consecutive NBA Finals appearances, he knows his new team isn’t a true contender with Golden State and the NBA’s elite just yet.The superstar welcomed every step in the process Monday as he began his next chapter in purple and gold.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil View comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew “I think this is a great start for the Lakers to get back to championship caliber,” said McGee, who just won two championship rings in Golden State. “For me personally, I feel like this is everybody’s dream as a basketball player, to put on the purple and gold and compete for a championship.”But on their first formal day together, nobody suggested the Lakers are remotely ready to compete with the Warriors, who would have four consecutive championships if James hadn’t won the Cavs’ first championship in legendary fashion instead in 2016.“We’ve got a long way to go to get to Golden State,” James said. “They can pick up right where they left off, starting with training camp. … We’re picking up from scratch, so we’ve got a long way to go. We can’t worry about what Golden State is doing.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next James finally made his first formal appearance as a member of the Lakers at their media day, nearly three months after he left Cleveland for a four-year, $153.3 million free-agent deal. In between posing for photos in his new gold No. 23 uniform, the 33-year-old superstar revealed part of the motivation behind his decision to join an iconic franchise that hasn’t made the playoffs in five years.“No matter what uniform I’m in, I’m always humsbled that I’m able to play this game at this level,” James said. “I think we all know that this franchise has been a historical franchise in this league for years. … That’s an excitement in its own right. And then it’s just always humbling for me when I get a chance to be a part of something special.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThe burgeoning entertainment mogul also politely scoffed at the notion his numerous interests in film and television production would be any distraction from his day job. Moving to Hollywood was not his motivation for going West, he insisted.“My decision was based solely on my family and the Lakers,” James said. “I’m a basketball player. I play ball. That’s what I do.” Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown James joined the Lakers along with veterans Rajon Rondo, JaVale McGee, Lance Stephenson and Michael Beasley this summer. They’ll team up with the Lakers’ talented young core to change the face of a 16-time champion franchise emerging from the worst half-decade in its lengthy history.But James made it perfectly clear he won’t judge his achievements in Los Angeles solely on championships, particularly not during these Lakers’ first season together.“I don’t believe the only thing that’s a success in marking a season is winning a championship,” James said. “There’s only one champion, but that doesn’t mean you’re not successful. There’s going to be wins and losses, but what you control is how you prepare every day.“We’re a new ballclub coming together. They have some returning guys, but as far as the ballclub, we’re all new to each other. So we have to take our bumps and our bruises. There’s going to be good times. There’s going to be bad times. That’s what happens when a team is new. But if we continue to work the process and we continue to sacrifice for one another and put in the commitment and the time to being great, everything else will fall into place.”This perspective contrasts sharply with the ring-or-bust mentality held by Kobe Bryant, the last superstar to wear this uniform. Two seasons after Bryant’s retirement, the Lakers have been replenished by the arrival of James and the veterans that he assembled around him.ADVERTISEMENT Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Modric crowned world’s best, ends Ronaldo-Messi eralast_img read more

G20 Anti-corruption Action Plan Seeks Transparency

first_imgBy the summit’s end, though, China made no attempt to block the action plan or suppress use of the word “bribery.” The push at the 2014 Brisbane meeting was for member nations to pass laws compelling corporations to identify who owns and controls them – the “beneficial owners.”  It, however, fell short of demanding that these persons and entities be known to the public as well as regulatory authorities. That has drawn criticism from some “good governance” groups, including Global Financial Integrity. “G20 countries recognize that bribery imposes a heavy price on both international business and society as a whole,” the action plan document said. “Combating bribery remains an important priority for the G20 growth agenda, including by helping to level the playing field for business, and giving the private sector the confidence it needs to invest…G20 countries also commit to comprehensively and effectively criminalize bribery – as well as the solicitation of bribes – and enforce such laws through civil and criminal actions.” Public official immunity – meaning persons in office are not prosecuted while in those positions – is a practice seen in many countries. It has been widely criticized by good governance groups as a means by which elected officials can engage in criminal activities such as corruption and get away with it – at least during their terms. “The Chinese people are generally far less concerned about foreign bribery than domestic bribery,” said Andrew Spalding, a law professor at the University of Richmond. “As the developed world increasingly enforces foreign bribery rules, this puts them at a competitive disadvantage in developing countries, especially in Africa. China knows that it can exploit this.” The G20 nations, comprising the world’s largest economies, met in mid-November in Brisbane, Australia, and came up with an action plan on how to fight corruption. Ahead of the summit, some observers voiced concerns that China would block action regarding identifying corporate owners. China’s use of “inducements” has been well known, especially in Africa, where the Asian giant has employed cash and other means to gain access to raw materials it needs to feed its industrial production. The plan is an outgrowth of what happened in 2010 when G20 leaders created the “Anti-Corruption Working Group” at a summit in Toronto. “For companies in any of these industries, it is the areas of interaction between private and public sectors which are most likely to generate opportunities for corruption – for example, public procurement and customs,” wrote Brook Horowitz in the FCPA Blog, which focuses on corruption. Public sector transparency and integrity is also a focus of the G20 plan. They are essential for “preventing the misuse or diversion of public funds and conflicts of interest, which can have a significant negative impact on economic growth and development,” the plan said.  The plan also addressed what it calls “high risk sectors” where corruption can invade legitimate market activity. The plan notes one area it calls “the extractive sector” – the mining and collection of raw materials from iron ore to timber. Another section calls for G20 members to approach the anti-corruption fight globally as well as within each state’s borders. The plan says they must “commit to helping to end impunity for corruption offenses, by working together to investigate and prosecute [offenders], to recover the proceeds of such offenses, and to deny entry and safe haven to corrupt officials and those who corrupt them – including mutual legal assistance and extradition consistent with the UNCAC [United Nations Convention Against Corruption]”Greg Thompson, with Transparency International Australia, says now that the words of the 2014 G20 Summit have been put to paper, it’s time to carry them out. “Effectively preventing and combating corruption in these high-risk sectors is essential to create an environment conducive to investment and to ensure critical assets and resources are not diverted away from economic growth and development,” the plan said. The Action Plan also calls on the private sector to adopt transparent and accountable standards of corporate behavior. It calls on G20 countries to institute and step up “developing anti-corruption education and training for business – and by examining best practices for encouraging businesses to implement robust compliance programs and self-report breaches of corruption laws.” “The devil,” he says “will now be in the detail of what every country – including Australia – does post-Brisbane to implement these actions.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more