World Cup Fan Fests to wow crowds

first_img17 May 2010Not all fans will be able to get their hands on coveted 2010 Fifa World Cup™ tickets, but they’ll still be able to experience the biggest soccer extravaganza in Africa at live Fan Fests – official public viewing events – in all nine host cities.Millions of fans are expected to watch the matches live and experience the unique World Cup ambience in these outdoor areas. Entrance to the Fifa Fan Fest™ is free, with all 64 matches to be broadcast on giant screens in a safe and secure environment.Fan fests in GautengIn Johannesburg, close to Alexandra township and the Sandton central business district, lies Innes Free Park, the venue for the Sandton Fan Fest. This park, with its rolling grass and water features, will provide a picturesque location for the event, with the Sandton skyline as a backdrop.Soweto soccer fans will watch all World Cup matches at the Rockville Fan Fest at Elkah Stadium. The venue is conveniently located next to the Thokoza Park station of Johannesburg’s new bus rapid transit system. Up to 40 000 people can be hosted at Elkah Stadium.In Pretoria, fans will be able to watch all matches at the Centurion Cricket Ground, located just outside the city’s central business district. With both seating and standing options, fans will be able to view all the games on the 50 square metre screen, with entertainment between games.Cape Town’s Fan WalkIn Cape Town, the Grand Parade will host all soccer lovers. It is situated at the heart of the city and has undergone extensive upgrades in preparation for the tournament.Getting to the Fan Fest will be easy, with the overhauled Cape Town Station just a few hundred metres from the venue. Or through the Fan Walk, which stretches from the Cape Town Stadium through the centre of Cape Town to the Grand Parade.Fan Fest on the beachDurban’s Fan Fest is the only one in South Africa situated on the beach – and with the city’s all-year round warm weather, fans will be in for a real feast. The Moses Mabhida Stadium is also within walking distance from the Fan Fest.In the Free State, the Fan Fest will be located at the Mangaung Outdoor Sports Centre in the township of Rocklands, 15 minutes from the Bloemfontein city centre.Within the venue, five-a-side football pitches will be available and fans will be able to get to and from the Fan Fest on a dedicated shuttle that runs from the centre of town.In Mpumalanga, Bergvlam High School will host all soccer lovers. It’s located just outside the Nelspruit city centre. Ample parking spaces will be available within walking distance of the Fan Fest, with the city providing alternative transport arrangements to ensure that people are able to move between the stadium and the fan fest with ease.In the Eastern Cape, the Port Elizabeth fan fest will be based at St Georges Park – the oldest park in the city and the site of the second-oldest cricket stadium in the country.Soccer fans will be able to get to and from the stadium on shuttle buses, or will be able to drive there and park in secure parking areas within walking distance from the venue.Hospitality packagesIn Limpopo, the Polokwane Fan Fest will be based at the city’s 107-year-old cricket club situated a short distance from the new Peter Mokaba Stadium. There will be both seating and standing options, with great views of the giant screens. Hospitality packages will also be available for those who wish to enjoy a more exclusive viewing experience.In the North West, the Fan Fest will be based at Fields College in Rustenburg, a short distance from the city centre. With a capacity of more than 20 000 people, the venue will be able to cater for those of you who aren’t lucky enough to get your hands on one of the elusive match tickets.Both parking and alternative transport arrangements will be in place to ensure easy access to the on¬site festivities.Official public viewing eventsOfficial public viewings events were first launched by Fifa at the 2006 World Cup, when more than 18-million fans gathered at the 12 official events, transforming Germany into one of the greatest fan parties of all time.Apart from the South African host cities, Berlin, London, Mexico City, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Rome and Sydney are also locations for the official public viewing events of football’s flagship tournament.In South Africa, the Fan Fests will be organised by the host cities together with Fifa and the Local Organising Committee, with the international Fan Fest cities and Fifa taking responsibility for the international events.SAinfo reporter and BuaNewsWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Enterprise 2.0: Grassroots Mashups + SOA = Managed Mashups ?

first_imgCriteria for an Enterprise Web 2.0 application includes:100% Browser BasedUses Enterprise Best Practices like security and versioningManaged services / GovernanceRadically easy to useMost companies are a long way from deploying Enterprise 2.0.  But it’s coming.   And it’s happening across all industries, and applications can range from telecom to legal to finance to whatever. SOA has met with success and acceptance because of its ability to meld together so many disparate systems, uniting data by tunneling between isolated information silos.  But Web 2.0’s mashup combinations using technologies like RSS, REST and AJAX is achieving the same kind of effect as the more rigorous, typically SOAP-based, SOA.  And the speed with which a Web 2.0 mashup can be whipped up outpaces what could be done in an SOA framework.But a big difference between the two approaches is in the reliability.  True SOA is based on Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and Web 2.0 simply is not.  The audience of the two applications are different.  Web 2.0 is winning over fans in the consumer world and SOA calls the enterprise its home. While maybe not an example of a Web 2.0 mashup, one comment from a MySpace user that captures the sentiment of what’s happening in the Web consumer space is that MySpace “provides so much of a benefit to people that errors and glitches we find are forgivable”.  Another user added, “and it’s free!”.  But unpredictable reliability isn’t acceptable in the enterprise.  And maybe when the novelty of Web 2.0 applications wears off, people’s feelings in the consumer world will change too.But as people in consumer space see the benefits of Web 2.0, they now are expecting the same things in the enterprise.  The move of Web 2.0 capabilities into the enterprise is leading to the distinction of Consumer Web 2.0 and Enterprise Web 2.0.  Yahoo! and Google maps won early and wide acceptance by consumers, and those services are also starting to show up frequently in business software demonstrations, like IBM’s QEDWiki and Salesforce.com.last_img read more

Chinese Decree Alters Recycling Picture

first_imgRecycling Vinyl SidingAre We Recycling Too Much of Our Trash?Plastic Production Rises But Recycling Can’t Keep Up Recycling plastic, paper, and metal is fundamental to a sustainable lifestyle, and for years China has given U.S. consumers a helping hand by accepting millions of tons of waste plastic every year. That practice is about to end.Until now, China has been the biggest importer of many types of recycled material, according to an article posted at The Conversation by Christine Cole, a research fellow in the U.K. Last year, that added up to 7.3 million metric tons of scrap plastic, including 1.4 million tons from the U.S.China has used scrap materials to manufacture new goods in its factories. But there was a problem — the useful raw materials loaded into all those recycling bins, the Chinese government complained, were laced with “dirty wastes or even hazardous wastes.” China last summer responded with a ban on yang laji, or “foreign garbage,” that goes into effect in just a few weeks.The new rules affect most scrap plastics, including PET (used for soda and water bottles), PVC, polyethylene, and polystyrene, Plastic News reported at the time. Recycling International said last month that China will set “impurity thresholds” for a variety of recycled materials, including a 0.5% impurity limit for plastics, paper, and ferrous metals. When the new policy was announced, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), a U.S. trade group, warned it would be “devastating” to the global recycling industry and could mean the loss of thousands of jobs in the U.S. China subsequently raised the impurity threshold from the original 0.3%, but the ISRI said last month the new limits, while an improvement, were still “of great concern.” RELATED ARTICLES Where will all that plastic go?One effect could be higher costs for U.S. towns and cities as recyclers are forced to upgrade their equipment, Adam Minter, a recycling expert, told The New York Times. “Without China there will be less recycling in the United States, and it will cost more,” he said. It might also mean that more recycled waste goes into landfills here, or more of it is burned in energy-recovery plants. The recycling industry could look for new export markets.Cole’s article points to one inherent problem with many current recycling programs, what’s called mixed waste processing. Instead of requiring consumers to sort their recyclables into separate bins for glass, plastic, metal, and other materials, many municipalities accept unsorted waste. That makes recycling much easier for households, and may increase the amount of waste that is recycled, but ultimately it results in more contamination and lower quality.“The problems we are now facing are caused by China’s global dominance in manufacturing and the way many countries have relied on one market to solve their waste and recycling problems,” Cole writes. “The current situation offers us an opportunity to find new solutions to our waste problem, increase the proportion of recycled plastic in our own manufactured products, improve the quality of recovered materials and to use recycled material in new ways.”A variety of possible ways of using waste plastics are on the horizon, including those outlined in this article posted at The Guardian. But for now, the industry is scrambling.For a look at the recycling problem told from a Chinese perspective, try the documentary Plastic China.last_img read more

The CSAs Michel Boyon Aurélie Filippetti France

first_imgThe CSA’s Michel Boyon & Aurélie FilippettiFrance’s six new HD DTT channels – HD1, L’Equipe 21, 6ter, Numéro 23, RMC Découverte and Chérie 25 – have gone on air.French media regulator the CSA launched the channels at an event yesterday in the presence of the country’s culture minister Aurélie Filippetti.The channels are currently available to about half of France’s households in total, according to the regulator, including 29% of DTT households. On DTT the channel is available in the Ile de France, Bourgogne, Aquitaine and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur regions, with a further 1,500 transmitters sett to distribute them in 12 phases between now and June 2015, ultimately giving 97% terrestrial coverage.In addition to the terrestrial network, the channels are available via satellite, ADSL and cable.last_img read more

Russian DTH provider Orion Express has launched a

first_imgRussian DTH provider Orion Express has launched a regional multiplex, providing regional TV channels as part of its offering from the 85° East position.The multiplex currently provides 10 regional channels – Pervyy Tul’skiy, Yurgan, NTM – Pervyy Yaroslavskiy, Stavropol Regional TV, BST, Kuray , Mir Belogor’ya, 12 Kanal – Omsk, Ekspress and Don – with others to follow.A number of Russia’s regional TV channels could be threatened with the loss of terrestrial distribution when the country completes digital switchover, leaving satellite and cable as their only viable options.last_img read more

Satellite services company SES is beaming an educa

first_imgSatellite services company SES is beaming an educational channel designed to help educate people in West Africa about the Ebola virus, across the region.Fight Ebola will be beamed into pay TV and free-to-air DTH homes as parts of West Africa continue to deal with the worst-ever outbreak of the deadly virus.The channel helps spread the message about protecting against Ebola and will give viewers a greater understanding of the virus with content endorsed by the Luxembourg Ministry of Health and contributions from groups including UNICEF, Doctors Without Borders (MSF), and End Ebola Now.There will also be endorsements and appeals from British Premier League football players including Didier Drogba, John Obi Mikel, Samuel Eto’o and Emmanuel Adebayor.“Many people do not understand this disease and therefore, tragically, do not seek the medical care they need,” said Ibrahima Guimba-Saidou, senior VP, commercial Africa at SES.In related news, Discovery Networks UK has commissioned a one-off doc about the deadly virus, Ebola Exposed (pictured). A copro between Discovery and Sky Vision, the fast-turnaround doc will look at the science behind the virus that has killed thousands of people in West Africa.David Morrissey (The Walking Dead) narrates the doc, which is billed as ‘an all-you-need to know film’ about Ebola.Dan Korn, senior VP & head of programming, Discovery Networks Western Europe, ordered the special, which will go out on November 22. He said: “Discovery is dedicated to providing new scientific insight into domestic and international events. Ebola Exposed does exactly this, uncovering brand new scientific research about this virulent disease from those at the forefront of the fight against it”.last_img read more

Determining how hearts develop to better understand congenital heart defects

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 14 2018To understand cardiovascular failures, the leading cause of birth defect-related deaths in infants, UH professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin is teaming up with Baylor College of Medicine professor of cellular and molecular physiology Irina Larina on a chicken and egg hunt.”When the heart develops, it becomes stiffer as required for ability to contract and pump blood,” said Larin. “So the question is – does it become stiff because it’s contracting, or is it stiff to begin with because it is genetically predefined?”Surprisingly, very little is known about an embryo’s developing heart.”Defining how these mechanical factors integrate with genetic pathways and heart function is critically important for understanding congenital heart defects and heart failure,” said Larin. Such information is required to develop new strategies for therapeutic interventions of heart defects.Related StoriesCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart diseaseRNA-binding protein SRSF3 appears to be key factor for proper heart contraction, survivalSmoking triples the risk of death from cardiovascular diseaseWhile multiple studies suggest that cardiac contraction, blood flow and stiffness each influence cardiovascular development of the heart, their individual roles remain unknown. The team’s project, defining the roles of cardiac contraction and flow-induced shear stress in regulating mechanical stiffness, is part of a $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.It is well established that biomechanical stimuli are important regulators of proper cardiovascular development. The research team will get a bird’s eye view, watching the heart develop in utero using optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive high-resolution retina imaging technology that uses light waves to take cross-section pictures. Larin is a pioneer of using OCT to image portions of the body without touching or making a cut. He describes the method as “frontier technology,” and is using it in his other work to assess if heart medicine is working and scar tissue is healing immediately following a heart attack.Larin is developing the data processing methods and the imaging tools which will deliver 3D images and will be “super-fast to catch the cardiac cycle and all the activity as the heart forms,” he said.”One out of every 100 babies in the United States has a congenital heart defect leading to death,” said Larina. “Understanding biomechanical regulation of heart development is highly important for better management of congenital heart defects.”The project fills a significant gap in the field of early mammalian cardiac development and defines the role of cardiac forces in maintaining mechanical stiffness and cell differentiation.Source: http://www.uh.edu/news-events/stories/2018/november-2018/111318-heart-defects-oct-larin.phplast_img read more

Female adolescent blood donors more likely to have iron deficiency and related

first_imgCredit: iStock Source:https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/newsroom/news-releases/study-adolescent-female-blood-donors-at-risk-for-iron-deficiency-and-associated-anemia Each year, an estimated 6.8 million people in the U.S. donate blood, according to the American Red Cross, which coordinates blood drives across the country. Adolescents are increasingly contributing to the donor pool due to blood drives at high schools. In 2015, adolescents ages 16-18 contributed approximately 1.5 million blood donations.Although blood donation is largely a safe procedure, adolescents are at a higher risk for acute, adverse donation-related problems, such as injuries from fainting during donation, explains study leaders Eshan Patel, M.P.H., a biostatistician in the Department of Pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Aaron Tobian, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology, medicine, oncology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of transfusion medicine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.Additionally, they add, blood donation may also increase the risk of iron deficiency, as each whole blood donation removes about 200-250 milligrams of iron from the blood donor. Because adolescents typically have lower blood volumes, when donating the same amount of blood, they have a relatively higher proportional loss of hemoglobin–the iron-containing protein in blood cells that transports oxygen–and consequently more iron during donation than adults. Females are even more at risk of iron deficiency than males due to blood loss during menstruation every month.Numerous studies have shown that younger age, female sex and increased frequency of blood donation are all associated with lower serum ferritin levels (a surrogate for total body iron levels) in blood donor populations. However, note Patel and Tobian, no study using nationally representative data has compared the prevalence of iron deficiency and associated anemia between blood donor and nondonor populations, specifically adolescents.Related StoriesCancer patients and those with anemia should not be denied opioids, says CDCInnovative microfluidic device simplifies study of blood cells, opens new organ-on-chip possibilitiesDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustToward this end, the researchers analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a long-running study designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the U.S. based on both physical exams and interviews conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 1999 to 2010, this study included collections of blood samples as well as questions about blood donation history in the past 12 months.The researchers found 9,647 female participants 16-49 years old who had provided both samples and blood donor history information. There were 2,419 adolescents ages 16-19 in this group.They report in the journal Transfusion on Feb. 19 that about 10.7 percent of the adolescents had donated blood within the past 12 months, compared with about 6.4 percent of the adults. Mean serum ferritin levels were significantly lower among blood donors than among nondonors in both the adolescent (21.2 vs. 31.4 nanograms per milliliter) and the adult (26.2 vs. 43.7 nanograms per milliliter) populations. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.5 percent among adolescent donors and 7.9 percent among adult donors–both low numbers, but still significantly higher than that of nondonors in both age groups, which was 6.1 percent. Besides, 22.6 percent of adolescent donors and 18.3 percent of adult donors had absent iron stores.Collectively, the authors say, these findings highlight the vulnerability of adolescent blood donors to associated iron deficiency.Patel and Tobian note that some federal policies and regulations are already in place to protect donors in general from iron deficiency due to this altruistic act, such as hemoglobin screening, a minimum weight to donate and an eight-week interval between donations for repeat whole blood donation. However, more protections are necessary for adolescent donors–for example, suggesting oral iron supplementation, increasing the minimum time interval between donations or donating other blood products such as platelets or plasma rather than whole blood could help mitigate iron loss.”We’re not saying that eligible donors shouldn’t donate. There are already issues with the lack of blood supply,” Tobian says. “However, new regulations or accreditation standards could help make blood donation even safer for young donors.”center_img Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 19 2019New public health measures could help protect this vulnerable population, authors sayFemale adolescent blood donors are more likely to have low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia than adult female blood donors and nondonors, which could have significant negative consequences on their developing brains, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. Based on these findings, the authors propose a variety of measures that could help this vulnerable population.last_img read more

Regeneration of severely damaged lungs using a interventional crosscirculation platform

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)May 7 2019Lung transplantation, the only lifesaving therapy for an increasing population of patients with end-stage lung disease, is severely limited by the number of available donor organs. Currently, up to 80 percent of donor lungs are rejected for serious but potentially reversible injuries. Since the beginning of transplantation in the 1960s, clinicians and scientists have been trying to address the critical shortage of donor organs.Now, a multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering and Vanderbilt University has–for the first time–demonstrated in a clinically relevant model that severely damaged lungs can be regenerated to meet transplantation criteria. In a study published today on Nature Communications ‘ website, the researchers describe the cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of the donor lung and the stability of the recipient for 36 to 56 hours. As Brandon Guenthart, a lead author of the study, explains, “to support lung recovery and to demonstrate cellular regeneration, we had to pursue a radically different approach and develop more minimally invasive diagnostics.” Current methodologies of lung support are limited to only 6 to 8 hours, a time that is too short for therapeutic interventions that could regenerate the injured lung and improve its function.The team, co-led by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, University Professor and The Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Sciences at Columbia Engineering, and Matthew Bacchettaunjak-Novakovic, the H. William Scott Professor of Surgery at Vanderbilt University, and adjunct professor at Columbia’s department of biomedical engineering, also developed new diagnostic tools for the non-invasive evaluation of the regenerating lung. They expect their advance will lead to an increase in the number of lungs for transplant, through the recovery of severely damaged lungs that are currently unsuitable for clinical use.The researchers have long been focused on developing processes to recover lungs that are being turned down for transplant because of injury to enable people with end-stage lung disease to live longer and better lives. “We have been fortunate to assemble a highly talented, interdisciplinary team of bioengineers, surgeons, pulmonologists, and pathologists, who have designed a durable physiologic support system for a donor lung outside the body, along with new technologies to achieve and monitor lung recovery,” Bacchetta says.Related StoriesVortex flow closely linked to pressure differences in ventricles of the heartComprehensive gene activity database could significantly reduce animal useUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyA previous study from the team demonstrated a cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of a donor lung for 36 hours. The researchers were able to use their advanced support system to fully recover the functionality of lungs injured by ischemia (restricted blood supply) and make them suitable for transplant.For this new study, the team decided to test the effectiveness of their platform technology combined with conventional therapies and new diagnostics on lungs afflicted by the most frequent injury leading to donor lung rejection–gastric aspiration. This injury is caused by the entry of gastric material into the respiratory tract, resulting in severe injury to the pulmonary epithelium and thus making the lung unacceptable for transplantation. Currently, severely damaged donor lungs cannot be salvaged using existing devices or methods. This new study suggests that lungs injured by gastric aspiration can be maintained outside the body for several days, are amenable to repeated therapeutic interventions, and display evidence of cellular regeneration and improved function. Lungs regenerated on this platform met all criteria for transplantation.”For seven years, we have diligently worked to develop new technologies for the maintenance and recovery of donor organs. This paper represents a culmination of fundamental and translational studies of lung bioengineering that have converged into a system capable to recover severely damaged lungs. We now have the team and technology to bring this research to the patients, by making more donor lungs available for transplant,” says Vunjak-Novakovic.The team plans to conduct further studies to evaluate the functional capacity of the lungs following transplantation and the safety of the method, using a clinically relevant large animal model with immunosuppression.”We envision that interventional cross-circulation may be used to investigate regeneration of other damaged organs, such as hearts, kidneys, and livers, expanding donor pools by salvaging severely damaged organs and leading to more organ transplants,” Bacchetta adds. Source:http://www.engineering.columbia.edu/last_img read more