Tony Becca | And now, a new technical director

first_img CAPTAIN TAYLOR Speaking of coaches, Jamaica is in need of coaches, good coaches, and quickly at that. Good coaches make good cricketers, sometimes they turn good cricketers into great cricketers, and good and great cricketers make good and great teams. At present, Jamaica has some good coaches – Robert Samuels, Terrence Corke and Odelmo Peters, to name a few – but more are needed, and many more at that. Jamaica’s cricket needs more coaches to match the numbers in football, more so, the numbers and the quality of those in track and field, and thank God, two good ones are now available. One who is currently available is Andre Coley, the former Kingston College, Kingston Club, Lucas, Jamaica Youth, West Indies Youth, and Jamaica wicketkeeper. Coley recently worked as an assistant coach on the West Indies team for a few years, but he is back home and ready to work in Jamaica. The other one is Robert Haynes, the former Kingston College, Lucas Club, Kensington Club, Jamaica Youth, West Indies Youth, Jamaica, and West Indies ODI right-arm leg-spinner, and the man who narrowly missed representing the West Indies in Test matches. It would be a good move to get them on the Jamaica Cricket Association’s team of coaches, where they could better serve Jamaica’s cricket well. COLEY AND HAYNES It is said that good things come to those who wait, and thankfully, something good has come to West Indies cricket, courtesy of president Dave Cameron. The new technical director of West Indies cricket is a West Indian, and he is none other than Jimmy Adams, the former Jamaica and West Indies left-handed batsman, part-time left-arm spinner, and part-time wicketkeeper who also served as captain. The man, who, after his first 12 Test matches, boasted a better average than the legendary Don Bradman, is also a member of the ICC’s World Cricket Committee and a former president of the FICA, the Federation of International Cricketers Association. After marking time for a long time, during which Englishman Richard Pybus sat in the position, the West Indies Cricket Board finally saw the wisdom of having one of their own in this most important position in their fight to get the West Indies back to the top of world cricket. And they could not have made a better choice. Adams is a good man, he was a good cricketer, and one who played with some good and great cricketers. He is bright, he was a student of the game before, during, and after his playing days, he broadened his knowledge of the game as coach of Jamaica and of country club Kent, and most important of all, he possesses a passion second to none for the development of the game. As one who has been through been there and done it all, mainly through hard work and dedication as against what is glibly called ‘natural talent’, he is also a natural fit for the job. On top of all that, Adams possesses the kind of personality, and the integrity, which make him ideal for the job, the job of working with and dealing with the West Indian people and their insularity. If anyone can do it, Adams seems to be the one. A round of applause for the West Indies Cricket Board for seeing the light and taking Adams on board as the technical director, even though they apparently have also employed Australian Stuart Law as the West Indies cricket coach. That move is a negative one following the replacement of Bennett King, another Australian, with Phil Simmons and then the firing of Simmons some months ago. It reminds me of the popular saying about the cow kicking over the pail of milk. The West Indies were once the best cricket team in the world, and arguably the best ever in the world, and the West Indies must have produced a few good coaches over the years. Simmons was and is a good coach, and his only mistake was that he mixed up the job as coach and that of a selector, or as the selector, and a very talkative one at that. It is, however, infra dig, or at least it appears so, to turn to an Australian, or an Englishman, or to anyone but a West Indian to solve the problem of West Indies cricket in this day and age. Congrats to Jamaica’s women’s cricket captain and to the winning West Indies women’s World Cup captain, Staphanie Taylor, who has been named captain of the Women’s Team of the Year by the International Cricket Council. This is the first year that the award has been made in women’s cricket. The team, which was named for the period September 2015 to September 2016, includes two West Indians, three New Zealanders, two Australians, two English, one Indian, and one South African. The team, which was named in batting order, has Taylor coming in at number four and Deandra Dottin, also of the West Indies, batting at number eight. New Zealand’s Suzzie Bates, who was named to bat at number one, was named the ODI and T20 Player of the Year. Bates, who won the ODI award in 2013, was the first player to win both awards. In ODI matches, she totalled 472 runs for an average of 94.90 per innings and took eight wickets at an economy rate of 3.75 runs over, and in T29 cricket, Bates scored 429 runs with four fifties at an average of 42.90 per innings.last_img read more

Minister Harmon stresses importance of admin professionals

first_img…“they are indispensable in the public service”By Devina SamarooThe public service has a crucial role to play in transforming Guyana, Minister of State Joseph Harmon charged to a roomful of administrative professionals who were eager to begin their training in public service efficacy on Wednesday morning at the Impeccable Banquet Hall, Brickdam.The event, which was organised by Zoywins Consultancy, under the theme “Shine like a Diamond”, coincides with worldwide celebrations of Administrative Professionals’ Day in recognition of the valuable contributions of administrative staff to the success of organisations.Both Private and Public Sector workers from across seven administrative regions gathered to participate in the seminar where they were brief on areas related to the development of cooperative style, strategies to prevent conflict and master cooperation and efficiency; maintenance of healthy lifestyles; among others.In delivering his opening remarks, Minister Harmon underscored the importance of being involving in training programmes of thisMinister of State, Joseph Harmon delivering remarks at the opening of the Administrative Professionals Workshop at the De Impeccable Banquet Hallnature, noting that the knowledge gained may attribute to career advancements and increased earnings.Harmon, who has responsibility for the public service, emphasised that administrative staff are an indispensable part of the delivery of public/ customer care service, and as such, he noted that it is most advantageous for organisations to invest in the proper training and development of these individuals.“Administrative professionals or secretaries are particularly important to this process in a number of ways, specifically, many of you, if not all of you, are the first point of contact between your organisation and the public. You are the face of you department or agencies or companies in which you work,” he explained, highlighting that as a consequence, administrative professionals contribute significantly to the way in which their employers are perceived.Harmon even shared a personal experience to support his assertions.“When we came into office under the coalition Government, I had the responsibility of organisation work of the Ministry of the Presidency, and from day one up to maybe day 40/50, people were coming to see me on a daily basis and sometimes by the time they get to me, they would have gone through sometimes two layers or three layers of persons and sometimes some of them come in vexed because they say “the people give me a hard time before I get to you”; and so I have been at pains to point out to those members in the public service that they are the faces of that administration, these are the people that interact with the public on a daily basis; therefore, if you are not courteous and you do not treat the public well, by time they come to me to deal with their problems, I have to unwind them, I have to spend an extra five or 10 minutes telling them that this is not the kind of administration we will have,” Harmon related.On this note, he charged that administrative professionals ought to be considered the backbones of organisations.“Your day to day work is the foundation of your organisations’ accomplishment. You take care of the details and the success achieved with respect to task undertaken… in reality, it cannot be done without you,” he stated.In further underscoring the importance of the public service in transforming the country, Harmon reminded that in delivering quality service, administrative professionals must strive to look beyond political, racial and religious persuasions.“It does not matter which political party you voted for… public servants should deliver with strict neutrality and integrity,” he noted.In conclusion, Minister Harmon urged the participants to work assiduously both individually and collectively, not only in striving for self-development but to bring about massive changes in the quality of public service being delivered in Guyana.“You are the agents of change,” he charged.last_img read more