Vermont fall colors close to peak in higher elevations and Northeast Kingdom

first_imgFoliage is nearing peak color in the Northeast Kingdom and in higher elevations across the state.Vibrant foliage will continue to develop around Vermont, and most areas of the state will be displaying multiple stages of colorful foliage throughout the week. Foliage is close to peak color in the Northeast Kingdom and in higher elevations, including sections of the Green Mountains. Look for bright color between Jay Peak and St. Johnsbury, Stowe and Pittsfield, and Killington and Wilmington.‘Expect brilliant color in most locations this weekend, with peak color at the highest elevations,’ said Orange County Forester David Paganelli. ‘The lower elevations and southern areas should be peaking during the middle or end of next week.’The foliage progression will continue to unfold around Vermont over the next several days.‘There has been a considerable increase in fall color in southwestern Vermont over the last week and the area is building toward peak,’ said forester Mike White of Dorset. ‘Reds and oranges are particularly common now and most trees are showing at least some fall color, providing dramatic views that can be seen anywhere in the region. As the area approaches peak color, the views only get better by the day.’Best Bets: In northern Vermont, try Route 114 between Lyndonville and Norton, Route 105 from North Troy to East Charleston, Route 5A from West Burke to Westmore, and Route 111 between Derby Center and Island Pond.Elsewhere in the state, Interstate 89 from Northfield to Bolton offers beautiful views of orange, red and yellow foliage along the hillsides. Colorful foliage can also be found on Route 108 between Stowe and Cambridge, Route 100 between Warren and Stowe, and Route 12 between Montpelier and Elmore.Mountain gap roads offer quality foliage viewing as well. Try Route 73 between Rochester and Brandon, Route 125 between Middlebury and Hancock, and Route 17 between Waitsfield and Starksboro.Look for bright color on Route 100 between Pittsfield and Granville, Route 12 between Woodstock and Bethel, Route 106 between Springfield and Woodstock, and Route 5 along the Connecticut River. Also suggested are Route 140 between Wallingford and Mount Holly, Route 103 between Cuttingsville and Proctorsville, and Route 4 between Killington and Quechee.In southern Vermont, suggested drives include Route 11 between Peru and Chester, Route 100 between Jacksonville and Weston, Route 7 between Wallingford and Manchester, Route 30 between Winhall and Newfane, and Route 9 between Bennington and Wilmington.In general, higher elevations will offer the most panoramic views of emerging color across the valleys, and many low-lying marsh areas will offer some of the most vivid and varied fall color.Source: Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing. 9.28.2010The Vermont Hospitality Council advises making advance reservations because the most popular lodgings may fill early on busy weekends during the foliage season. Some innkeepers may require a minimum two-night stay, especially on busy weekends. Vermont tourism officials encourage visitors to take advantage of midweek specials during the foliage season as part of the statewide ‘Midweek Peek’ promotion. Deals range from discounted lodging to free Vermont products. For details, visit www.VermontVacation.com/midweek(link is external).last_img read more

‘One of My Top Five Innings’ Says India’s Saviour Pujara

first_imgAdelaide: Rating his knock of 123 as one of his top five innings, Indian batting star Cheteshwar Pujara on Thursday admitted that the top order should have batted better in the first innings of the opening Test against Australia at the Adelaide Oval here.Pujara felt it was a decent total as the pitch was difficult to bat on.“I would say it is a decent total because there is enough turn,” Pujara said at the post match press conference.“Ashwin will also come into play. It is not an easy wicket to bat on. Sometimes when you are seeing it on TV, it doesn’t look like it is doing a lot but when I batted in the first and second sessions, I felt it wasn’t easy to bat on. I will share my experience of what line and length to bowl on this pitch with our fast bowlers.”“It is the grass. The odd ball is skidding on, and the odd ball is holding a bit more from the grass. I would say it is kind of a two-paced pitch, and it is not easy to bat on,” he added.Pujara faced 246 balls for his 123. He said it took him two sessions to figure out what shots he can play on such a surface, adding that is the reason the other batters around him should have applied themselves better.“To be honest, we should have batted better but they also bowled well in the first two sessions and I knew that I had to stay patient and wait for the loose balls,” Pujara said.“The way they bowled, they bowled in the right areas. I also felt that our top order should have batted better, but they will learn from the mistakes and put up a better show in the second innings.“It is one of my top innings in Test cricket, I could say top five,” Pujara said.“The way the team-mates appreciated it, they were saying it was one of the best.”Pujara had to struggle with a hamstring niggle as he accelerated with the tail for company, but it was a case of mind over matter in the end.“It was tough but I was set and I knew I could play my shots, especially when we lost the seventh wicket,” Pujara said. “Myself and Ash were having a good partnership but once we lost Ash, I thought I had to accelerate. I knew what shots I could play on that wicket because I had batted for two sessions, and I think it was tough it was considering the weather. It was quite hot, we are used to it in India but still…”“My leg got stuck into the pitch, and when I was trying to go for the second run, I had a little bit of a pull in my hamstring but I am going to consult the physio now,” Pujara said. “Hopefully it is not too bad.” IANS Also Read: Sports Newslast_img read more