News in brief: Fulham youngsters out of Cup, Finn washed out

first_imgFA Youth CupFulham, last season’s finalists, were beaten 2-1 by Crewe Alexandra at Gresty Road on Wednesday evening.The hosts went in front midway through the first half when Whites keeper Magnus Norman saved Andre Brown’s shot, but George Cooper snapped up the rebound.Brown doubled Crewe’s lead not long after the break and although Stephen Humphrys pulled a goal back in the 90th minute, Fulham couldn’t muster an equaliser.Hampton & Richmond BoroughDefender Matt Drage will train with the club on Thursday ahead of a planned move from Kingstonian. On-loan centre-back Kieran Murphy has been recalled by Hemel Hempstead Town.London Senior CupHarrow Borough’s 9-8 penalty shoot-out win over Hanwell Town on Tuesday has earned them a quarter-final visit to Beckenham Town. The tie will be played on 27 January.Hendon, who beat London Bari last week, will host one of Bromley, Corinthian-Casuals or AFC Wimbledon the following evening.Hampton SchoolTwo local youngsters have been selected in the Independent Schools England squad for two matches at St. George’s Park this month.Hampton School pupils Tom Phillipson and Matt Wisdom will be part of an 18-strong party, drawn from independent schools across the country, to play against Welsh Colleges on Wednesday 17 December and an unannounced opponent on Thursday 18 December.Harrow School will play host to the ISFA’s first fixture of 2015, against Australia Schools, on 1 February.Steven FinnThe Middlesex bowler took 1-28 in six overs as Sri Lanka were bowled out for 239 in the fifth one-day international in Pallakele.Persistent rain meant England were unable to start their reply, so Finn’s county team-mate Eoin Morgan will hope to guide the tourists to victory on Thursday’s reserve day.Martin GouldThe Pinner snooker star has been drawn to play world number 89 Chris Melling in the first qualifying round for the German Masters.If Gould, ranked 27, comes through that match next Thursday (18 December), he will play either Jamie Cope or Ross Muir the next day for a place in the main draw. The tournament proper takes place in early February.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Road trip to Miller, Coors will determine Giants’ trade deadline strategy

first_imgMILWAUKEE — The San Francisco Giants have won seven of their last nine, moved to 5.5 games back in the National League Wildcard race and entered the All-Star break playing their best baseball of the season.Now comes the hard part.As the second half begins on Friday, the Giants will play 14 games over the next 13 days including seven on a six-day road trip that features stops at Miller Park and Coors Field.Even if he’s completely recovered from an elbow contusion suffered on Saturday against …last_img read more

Bafana Bafana

first_img4 February 2013Coach Gordon Igesund praised his charges following Saturday’s nerve-wracking loss in the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations quarterfinals, saying they had shown great courage and self-belief in getting so far in the tournament, adding that Bafana Bafana had now established a solid platform to build on.“Yes, like everyone around the country, I am hugely disappointed that we did not proceed to the last four,” Igesund said following Saturday’s quarterfinal loss to Mali.‘I am very proud of my team tonight’“But I can tell you now I am very proud of my team tonight. They came here and matched one of the best teams on the continent and even took them to penalties. Just a pity with penalties it’s the luck of the draw, tonight luck was on Mali’s side, they took their penalty kicks well,” Igesund said.The match was decided from the penalty spot after the sides were level at 1-1 after extra time, with the Malians taking the shootout 3-1.Bafana had progressed to the knockout stages after ending top of Group A, having beaten Angola 2-0 and drawn 2-2 with Morocco and 0-0 with Cape Verde.“We lost with pride, dignity and passion,” Igesund said, adding that his team had made huge strides during the tournament.‘This team has a bright future’“We got better and better as the tournament went on. It was a tough ask and we knew that. The improvement we made are fantastic. This team has come a long way, not only the way they play but also off the field … We might be disappointed now, but this team has a bright future.”Igesund said it was important for Bafana Bafana to focus now on their 2014 World Cup qualification campaign, adding: “The message is clear – we will only pick the best squad for the country. No player will walk in this team because his name of Joe Soap – we have set a precedent that players will be rewarded for performances.”Sport Minister Fikile Mbalula echoed Igesund after Saturday’s game, praising them for bringing Afcon 2013 to life and inspiring South Africans across the country.Mbalula wished Mali and the other remaining teams well in their endeavour to lift the Afcon 2013 trophy on the 10th of February.“We look forward to Bafana Bafana representing us proudly in Brazil, both at the 2014 Confederations and the Fifa World Cup,” the minister said.“We thank South Africans who continued to rally behind Bafana Bafana, and plead for their continued support towards the remaining teams in the tournament.”SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

U2U makes data more accessible to farmers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Researchers at nine universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are celebrating the completion of a six-year, $5 million program that reinvented the way climate scientists connect with farmers.The Useful to Usable (U2U) project aimed to mold existing climate data into relevant products for the agricultural community. Project participants first learned about the type of climate data that farmers employ when making growing decisions on their farms and how they employ that data. The team used those insights to develop products that would help farmers determine what, when and where to plant, as well as how to manage crops to maximize yields with eyes on limiting negative effects on the environment.Purdue University’s Linda Prokopy, a professor of natural resource social science and U2U lead project director, and Melissa Widhalm, U2U project manager, led a team of nearly four dozen faculty, staff and students from partnering universities. Many of the team’s findings were published early online in a special issue of the journal Climate Risk Management slated for March release.Researchers started by building relationships with farmers and those they work with to understand how they go about making strategic business decisions. The team found that the best way to reach those farmers was through people who already have their ear — and their respect — such as crop advisors.“It’s really important to listen,” Prokopy said. “We started at the other end and asked what people want and how to deliver that with scientific credibility. We were able to develop tools that were actually useful to them and usable by them.”Those tools cover a wide range of climate issues with which farmers deal. Examples include AgClimate ViewDST, which offers users access to historical climate and crop yield data for the Corn Belt, including monthly temperature and precipitation, and plots corn and soybean yield trends; Corn GDDDST, which gives growers current and historical measurements of heat accumulation that help predict plant development rates and maturity dates; the Corn Split NDST tool, which helps farmers and advisors manage application of in-field nitrogen to maximize crop yields with the least environmental damage; the Irrigation InvestmentDST, which uses historical weather and crop model data along with farm-specific economic data to explore the profitability of installing irrigation equipment across the Corn Belt; and Climate Patterns ViewerDST, which helps growers make more informed farm management decisions during different phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation and Arctic Oscillation.The team was able to take the tools on the road, showcasing them at more than 150 Extension and other events across the Corn Belt, to present them to potential users and listen to feedback to improve those and future tools.“We wanted to make sure we weren’t creating tools that were just ignored,” Widhalm said. “Just because the information is out there doesn’t mean people are using it.”Many papers were published in a wide range of scientific journals over the course of the project in fields from biophysical and climate sciences to social sciences and economics, but the special issue of Climate Risk Management will give the team an opportunity pull together some of the key elements of U2U.“This was our chance to really put a lot of the findings from all of the different disciplines in one space so we could show the breadth of the accomplishments of the U2U project,” Prokopy said.The USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture funded the U2U project. Team members came from: Purdue University, Iowa State University, Michigan State University, South Dakota State University, University of Illinois, University of Michigan, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Wisconsin, the High Plains Regional Climate Center, the Midwestern Regional Climate Center and the National Drought Mitigation Center.This project was supported by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Competitive Grant no. 2011-68002-30220 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.last_img read more

Black athletes have long history of not sticking to sports

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Carlos said Mexico City was the only place he could’ve made such a statement.“At that time, for me, there was no other vehicle than the Olympic Games,” he recalled. “I felt like the humanitarian issues at that time, as well as the humanitarian issues of today, are more compelling to me than an Olympic medal. I love the Olympics and I love sports, but I love a just cause for humanity even greater.”It is a sentiment shared by NFL players.The killing of mostly unarmed black men by mostly white police officers sparked the Black Lives Matter movement, which has again drawn black athletes into the national conversation on race . The sideline protests in the NFL — started in August 2016 by Kaepernick — have been the most prominent display of players’ engagement, though black athletes in baseball and basketball have also had smaller displays of activism.Because sports are such a prominent aspect of American life, they remain an effective way to bring attention to issues of racial injustice.“This is our inheritance,” said Howard Bryant, senior writer at ESPN and author of the forthcoming book “The Heritage: Black Athletes, A Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism.”“You’re not allowed to check out,” Bryant said. “This is going to continue until the United States respects the black brain more than the black body. Then sports can go back to what it was supposed to be — just a game.”Media — and social media in particular — has helped in recruiting athletes to the cause, explained Color of Change Executive Director Rashad Robinson, whose online civil rights organization has joined with athletes in addressing systemic racism and mobilized its membership to boycott the NFL and its corporate sponsors.Such stands have often come at a cost, even for today’s players, who are far more prominent and wealthy than their predecessors. Like players who spoke out before them, they have been met with violence and vitriol, described as unpatriotic, ungrateful and disrespectful.“The public is used to black guys selling sneakers and making jump shots,” said Bryant. “Do white people want to hear what black people have to say? No, they don’t. Does it need to be said? Yes.” AFP official booed out of forum “The whole purpose of the demonstrations is to get (fans’) attention,” Kareem Abdul-Jabbar said in an interview with The Associated Press. “These are the people that ignore the fact that people are being shot dead in the street. They’ve found ways to ignore it.”For weeks, some NFL players, most of them African-American, knelt silently on the sidelines as the national anthem played before kickoff. Their goal: to raise awareness about disparities in policing in communities of color, and about persistent, systemic racism in America.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt was a new approach to an age-old problem.“It’s because of what happens to him that others know they have to toe the line,” said New York University historian Jeffrey Sammons. “They can’t be seen as defiant or opponents of the system . They know they can’t succeed without living up to expectations and being humble, unassuming and supportive of the established order.” Then came along Muhammad Ali, who was not one to toe the line.Ali was the most visible and influential athlete of his generation when he protested the Vietnam War as racially unjust by refusing to be drafted in 1967, a move that cost him his livelihood, derailing his fighting career for years.Ali’s actions influenced others. Basketball player Abdul-Jabbar boycotted the 1968 Summer Olympics. At the same games, held in Mexico City, American track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos held raised fists covered in black leather gloves as the national anthem played after winning gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race.Abdul-Jabbar, who at 70 represents a bridge between Ali and Kaepernick, went on to a storied NBA career, but Smith and Carlos returned home to the threat of having their medals taken, and faced difficulty finding coaching jobs.“It was an international stage that was being used to promote how unified and wonderful the world is, but black Americans at that point were still in a very tough struggle to obtain their rights, both human and political,” Abdul-Jabbar said of the 1968 games. “The fact that (Smith and Carlos) used an international platform to speak for people who usually don’t have any power to be heard made it all the more significant.”ADVERTISEMENT Mayweather drops another hint at MMA fight Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games PLAY LIST 01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LATEST STORIES MOST READ NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerscenter_img Read Next Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Abdul-Jabbar agreed, tying Ali’s fate to Kaepernick’s as two athletes who sacrificed their livelihoods at the height of their careers for a greater cause.“Anybody that knows anything about football will tell you that he is a talented athlete and should be on somebody’s team,” Abdul-Jabbar, author of “Becoming Kareem: Growing Up On and Off the Court,” said of Kaepernick. “I think he’s being blackballed.”But with the cost are also benefits. Using the universal language of sports as a platform to discuss race reveals racism and galvanizes support to end it, Robinson said.“Part of why people are paying attention is because of exactly who they are,” he said. “Throughout time, it has been the people with reputations and something to lose whose risk-taking has helped result in change.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding FILE – In this Feb. 25, 1966 file photo, While Illinois Athletic Commission listened, heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali speaks, in Chicago. Ali had criticized his imminent army draft. (AP Photo/File)This year’s NFL season featured two of America’s pastimes: football and race, with pre-game protests dividing fans along color lines and making Sunday afternoons among the most segregated hours in the country.While some fans would prefer players stick to sports, many black athletes have chosen a different path by protesting, making people uncomfortable.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoiseslast_img read more