Infosys to hire 10000 Americans in the next two years build four

first_imgInfosys campus in Bengaluru.Reuters FileInfosys said on Tuesday that it will be stepping up its local hiring in the US and set-up four technological hubs in the country in line with the comments company made after the declaration of Q4 and FY2017 results recently. The recruitment will be staggered over two years.”Infosys is committed to hiring 10,000 American technology workers over the next two years to help invent and deliver the digital futures for our clients in the United States,” Vishal Sikka, Chief Executive Officer, Infosys, said in a statement.The four hubs will focus on technology and innovation, apart from serving clients in key industries such as financial services, manufacturing, healthcare, retail and energy and more. The first such hub will open in Indiana in August 2017.”In helping our clients improve their businesses and pursue new kinds of opportunities, we are really excited to bring innovation and education in a fundamental and massive way to American workers. New advances in technology – artificial intelligence, in particular – are radically transforming our world, and it is within our reach to learn these new technologies and to be the innovators and entrepreneurs who bring solutions based on these technologies to our clients in all industries,” Sikka added.Eric J Holcomb, Indiana governor, said the move will benefit the state in a big way.”It’s so good to welcome Infosys to Indiana, and to expand our growing tech ecosystem with the addition of their estimated 2,000 Hoosier jobs. I look forward to working with Infosys to elevate Indiana to the next level,” he said.Infosys had over 2 lakh employees as of March 31, 2017; the nationality-wise break-up was not available.The announcment is significant in the context of the ongoing developments in the US that has tightened the norms for issuing H-1 B visas. Infosys shares were trading 0.18 percent down at Rs 918 apiece on the BSE on Tuesday.last_img read more

Indian election parties hit by funding clampdown

first_imgAn electoral official demonstrates the vote casting process to members of the public during Systematic Voter’s Education and Electoral Participation (SVEEP), as part of regional outreach in Bangalore on 12 April 2019, for the ongoing general election in the country. Photo: AFPIndia’s Supreme Court on Friday ordered parties to name anonymous donors behind tens of millions of dollars in funding as hostilities intensified in the country’s mega-election.The order came ahead of the second round of voting and after the election watchdog called for a clampdown on prime minister Narendra Modi’s personal television channel, saying it breached campaign rules.While Modi and his opposition rival Rahul Gandhi returned to the campaign trail, the country’s top court gave parties seven weeks to name people who have bought “electoral bonds” in recent months.Rival parties are said to be spending up to $7 billion on the election, which started Thursday and runs through to 19 May, and funding sources have come under the spotlight.The bonds—bought for between $15 and $140,000 and then given to a designated party—are controversial because they are anonymous.India’s election commission and watchdog groups which took the case to the Supreme Court said the bonds should be ended because of the risk of businesses making secret contributions to influence decisions.Modi’s government, which introduced the bonds in 2017, opposed naming donors. The ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is the biggest beneficiary of the bonds, according to the Association for Democratic Reforms (ADR), one of the groups behind the case.More than $150 million in bonds were bought in 2018, according to the Factly Indian data journalism portal.Experts estimate that at least the same amount was bought in the months ahead of the election.NaMo blowAccording to the ADR, the BJP—the world’s biggest political party—received about $150 million in total donations in 2018, of which more than half came from anonymous sources. Congress brought in about $30 million and about 60 percent was anonymous.The prime minister, who won a landslide in 2014 and is considered frontrunner in this race, faced increased pressure after the election commission said his NaMo TV breached campaign rules.The commission ordered NaMo TV, which is sponsored by the BJP, to submit all of its content for approval.Under Indian election rules, any content deemed campaign material—including adverts, films and even social media—needs permission from the independent watchdog.NaMo TV shows 24-hour programmes on Modi rallies, speeches, and even rap songs and dance routines devoted to the normally austere leader. It was being broadcast as normal on Friday.The order was the commission’s second blow to the Modi campaign in 48 hours, after it postponed the release of a flattering movie about the 68-year-old prime minister until after voting finishes.Producers of the film insisted they had no links to the BJP. But the commission said the film “PM Narendra Modi”, which tells of the Hindu nationalist leader’s ascent from selling tea at a train station to prime minister, could not be released during the election.Modi and Gandhi kept up their punishing schedule of rallies ahead of the next vote on 18 April.Modi has sought to portray himself as tough on national security, particularly against Pakistan, which India accuses of fuelling an insurgency in Kashmir. The two countries came close to a new war in February after a suicide attack in the disputed territory.“To kill terrorists in their dens is a policy of a new India,” Modi thundered at an election rally Thursday referring to an airstrike inside Pakistan.Gandhi and Congress have sought to focus on the economy and the fate of India’s many minorities who say they feel more threatened under the Hindu nationalist government.“This is the ‘New India’ they want, one completely devoid of unity and brotherhood,” said Congress.In Thursday’s first day, voter turnout averaged 66 per cent, according to the Hindustan Times daily, compared to 70 per cent in the 2014 polls.The first day of polling saw two supporters of rival parties die in Andhra Pradesh state and a teenager killed in clashes with security forces in Jammu and Kashmir.last_img read more

Researchers create 3D stereoscopic color prints with nanopixels

first_img The researchers, led by Professor Joel K.W. Yang, at A*STAR (the Agency for Science, Technology and Research) in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and the Singapore University of Technology and Design, have published a paper on the new technique for realizing 3D full-color stereoscopic prints in a recent issue of Nature Communications.”We have created possibly the smallest-ever stereoscopic images using pixels formed from plasmonic nanostructures,” Yang told Phys.org. “Such stereoscopic images do not require the viewer to don special glasses, but instead, the depth perception and 3D effect is created simply by viewing the print through an optical microscope coupled with polarizers.”The work is based on the concept of surface plasmon resonance: metal nanostructures can scatter different wavelengths (colors) of light due to the fact that the tiny nanostructures themselves resonate at different wavelengths. If a nanostructure is circular, its resonance is polarization-independent because the diameter of the circle is the same from all directions. However, if a nanostructure is biaxial (such as an ellipse or rectangle), its resonance will depend on the polarization of the incident light. By tailoring the exact dimensions of the biaxial nanopixels, researchers can generate different colors under different polarizations.Building on these ideas, the researchers in the current study have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive nanopixels that encode two sets of information can be used to produce 3D stereoscopic microprints. To do this, the researchers created nanopixels out of tiny pieces of aluminum a hundred or so nanometers across. The scientists experimented with nanopixels in two different shapes: elliptical and coupled nanosquare dimers (a pair of squares separated by a very small gap). This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. To demonstrate how these nanopixels could enable high-resolution 3D color microprints, the researchers designed a stereoscopic image containing stars on a 2D sheet by overlaying two slightly displaced views of the same image onto the same area. Then they added an x- and y-polarizer to the eyepieces of a microscope. Viewing the microprint through this stereomicroscope reveals a different image for each polarization, and the combined images appear as a 3D image.In addition to 3D prints, the polarization-sensitive nanopixels could have several other applications.”One can envision application of these prints to high-density optical information encoding or holography,” Yang said. “3D security elements that are difficult to replicate, and which offer different levels of authentication, could also be generated for anti-counterfeiting and anti-forgery technologies.”The researchers also note that it’s possible to make pixels that can encode not just two, but three or more images in a single pixel. For example, nanostructures that have circularly asymmetric shapes could have more than two polarization-dependent resonances due to the additional circularly polarized dimension. The researchers also plan to take steps toward commercialization.”Moving forward, there is much interest in developing techniques for creating such prints with significantly lower cost and higher throughput, both of which are imperative for this technology to be implementable at an industrial level,” Yang said. More information: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. “Three-dimensional plasmonic stereoscopic prints in full color.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6361 Because these shapes are biaxial, they exhibit plasmonic resonances at different wavelengths for each axis, with the colors determined almost entirely by the dimension of the axis parallel to the polarization direction. For example, a 130-nm x 190-nm elliptical pixel appears green under y-polarized light and purple under x-polarized light. Comparing the two pixel shapes, the researchers found that the elliptical pixels have a broader range of polarization-dependent colors, while the nanosquare dimer pixels have lower levels of cross-talk, minimizing unwanted mixing of colors. Microprints of a square and cross printed onto the same area formed from (a) elliptical nanopixels and (b) coupled nanosquare pixels under x- and y-polarized light. (c) SEM image of the region indicated by the dotted box in (b). (d) Images decoupled by polarizers. (e) Overlay of images in (d) to form a stereoscopic image with depth perception. (f) SEM image of the region indicated by the dotted box in (e). Credit: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited Journal information: Nature Communications Citation: Researchers create 3-D stereoscopic color prints with nanopixels (2014, November 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-d-stereoscopic-nanopixels.html Meta-hologram produces dual images and multiple colors (w/ Video) Explore further (Phys.org) —By designing nanopixels that encode two sets of information—or colors of light—within the same pixel, researchers have developed a new method for making 3D color prints. Each pixel can exhibit one of two colors depending on the polarization of the light used to illuminate it. So by viewing the pixels under light of both polarizations, two separate images can be seen. If the two images are chosen to be slightly displaced views of the same scene, viewing both simultaneously results in depth perception and the impression of a 3D stereoscopic image. © 2014 Phys.org (Left) Elliptical and coupled nanosquare pixels scatter different wavelengths of light depending on polarization. (Right) The stereomicroscope setup uses different polarizers on each eyepiece to image two superposed microprints which contain pixels that present two laterally displaced images to the left and right eyes of a viewer, resulting in depth perception. Credit: Xiao Ming Goh, et al. ©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limitedlast_img read more