Angela Aguilar Aida Cuevas Natalia Lafourcade Sang A Powerful Rendition Of La

first_img Prev Next Email Angela Aguilar, Aida Cuevas & Natalia Lafourcade Sang A Powerful Rendition Of “La Llorona” At The 2019 GRAMMY Premiere Ceremony 61st GRAMMY Awards: Full Nominees & Winners List 61st GRAMMY Awards Relive GRAMMY Week 2019 In Pictures Backstage At The 2019 GRAMMYs | Photo Gallery Facebook 5 Ways BTS Won Our Hearts At The 2019 GRAMMYs 61st GRAMMYs: Here’s Your Apple Music Playlist Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. To Play The 61st GRAMMYs The three women graced the stage immediately prior to the 61st GRAMMY Awards on Sunday, Feb. 10 on CBSRachel BrodskyGRAMMYs Feb 10, 2019 – 3:32 pm Three immensely talented women took the 2019 GRAMMY Premiere Ceremony stage on Sunday, Feb. 10: 15-year-old nominee Angela Aguilar, who is nominated for Best Regional Mexican Music Album, took the stage with Aida Cuevas and Natalia Lafourcade performed “La Llorona” (translated to “The Weeping Woman.” Cardi B, Post Malone Among 2019 GRAMMYs Performers Who Will Voters Pick For Best Pop Album? BTSPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Who Will Voters Pick For Best Latin Pop Album? Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images Photo: studioEAST/Getty Images Meet The GRAMMY Man: How GRAMMYs Are Made 61st GRAMMYs: Here’s Your Apple Music Playlist In Latin American folklore, “La Llorona” is said to be the ghost of a woman who lost her children and cries while searching for them in the river, which ultimately causes misfortune to those who are near or hear her. “Ranchera music does something to you that I don’t think a lot of genres can do,” Aguilar told the Recording Academy in an exclusive interview. “Some songs are made to listen to in the background, some songs are [made] just to dance to, some songs are [made for you] to feel something and I feel like almost every ranchera song is made for you to feel something.”Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: Angela Aguilar On Her Culture And Family LegacyWatch the 61st GRAMMY Awards on Sunday, Feb. 10 on CBS. Record Of The Year 61st GRAMMY Award Nominees 5 Ways BTS Won Our Hearts At The 2019 GRAMMYs 2019 GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony Kacey MusgravesPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Meet The GRAMMY Man: How GRAMMYs Are Made Who Will Voters Pick For Best Pop Album? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Red Carpet Who Will Voters Pick For Best Rap Performance? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Red Carpet Amy Winehouse Best New Artist winner for 2007 | Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Who Is Eligible For The Best New Artist GRAMMY? 2019 GRAMMY Awards Telecast | Photo Gallery Photo: studioEAST/Getty Images Artists React To Their 2019 GRAMMY Nominations Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images John BillingsPhoto: Jesse Grant/WireImage/Getty Images Meet The GRAMMY Man: How GRAMMYs Are Made Who Will Voters Pick For Best Latin Pop Album? NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Feb 10, 2019 – 3:34 pm Natalia Lafourcade “La Llorona”:GRAMMY Performance Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. To Play The 61st GRAMMYs Photo: studioEAST/Getty Images BTSPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images News Record Of The Year 61st GRAMMY Award Nominees Poll: Who Do You Want To See On The Red Carpet? Amy Winehouse Best New Artist winner for 2007 | Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images 61st GRAMMY Awards: Full Nominees & Winners List John BillingsPhoto: Jesse Grant/WireImage/Getty Images Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images 2019 GRAMMY Awards Telecast | Photo Gallery Cardi BPhoto: Dan MacMedan/WireImage Read more Brandi Carlile, H.E.R. To Play The 61st GRAMMYs Record Of The Year 61st GRAMMY Award Nominees John BillingsPhoto: Jesse Grant/WireImage/Getty Images TLC Photo: Alison Buck/Getty Images 5 Ways BTS Won Our Hearts At The 2019 GRAMMYscenter_img Who Will Voters Pick For Best Latin Pop Album? Relive GRAMMY Week 2019 In Pictures Backstage At The 2019 GRAMMYs | Photo Gallery Twitter Poll: Who Do You Want To See On The Red Carpet? TLC Photo: Alison Buck/Getty Images Poll: Who Do You Want To See On The Red Carpet? Lady GagaPhoto: Christopher Polk/Getty Images Cardi BPhoto: Dan MacMedan/WireImage Artists React To Their 2019 GRAMMY Nominations Best New Artist Nominees Revealed | 61st GRAMMYs H.E.R.Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage 2019 GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony Artists React To Their 2019 GRAMMY Nominations Best New Artist Nominees Revealed | 61st GRAMMYs Who Will Voters Pick For Best Rap Performance? Watch Angela Aguilar At The Premiere Ceremony angela-aguilar-aida-cuevas-natalia-lafourcade-sang-powerful-rendition-la-llorona-2019 Who’s Nominated For Song Of The Year? Poll: Who Will Voters Choose For Best Rap Album? Who Will Voters Choose For Best Alternative Album? Best New Artist Nominees Revealed | 61st GRAMMYs TLC Photo: Alison Buck/Getty Images 61st GRAMMY Awards: Full Nominees & Winners List 61st GRAMMYs: Here’s Your Apple Music Playlist H.E.R.Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage BTSPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Cardi B, Post Malone Among 2019 GRAMMYs Performers Cardi BPhoto: Dan MacMedan/WireImage Album Of The Year vs. Record Of The Year Explained 2019 GRAMMY Awards Red Carpet Who Will Voters Pick For Best Rap Performance? Amy Winehouse Best New Artist winner for 2007 | Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Album Of The Year Nominees | 61st GRAMMY Awards Album Of The Year vs. Record Of The Year Explained Album Of The Year Nominees | 61st GRAMMY Awards 2019 GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony Who Will Voters Pick For Best Pop Album? Who Will Voters Choose For Best Alternative Album? Album Of The Year vs. Record Of The Year Explained Poll: Who Will Voters Choose For Best Rap Album? Kacey MusgravesPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Lady GagaPhoto: Christopher Polk/Getty Images Who Is Eligible For The Best New Artist GRAMMY? H.E.R.Photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage Who Will Voters Choose For Best Alternative Album? Who’s Nominated For Song Of The Year? Kacey MusgravesPhoto: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images Cardi B, Post Malone Among 2019 GRAMMYs Performers Who’s Nominated For Song Of The Year? Relive GRAMMY Week 2019 In Pictures 2019 GRAMMY Awards Telecast | Photo Gallery Who Is Eligible For The Best New Artist GRAMMY? Poll: Who Will Voters Choose For Best Rap Album? Lady GagaPhoto: Christopher Polk/Getty Images Backstage At The 2019 GRAMMYs | Photo Gallery Album Of The Year Nominees | 61st GRAMMY Awards last_img read more

OnePlus 7 Pro said to support 5G and have a super fast

first_img Share your voice Retail site Giztop has already published rumored specs for the forthcoming OnePlus 7 that include a 6.5-inch AMOLED screen, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 processor, rear triple cameras, a 16-megapixel pop-up selfie camera, a 4,000-mAh battery and Oxygen OS 9 base running on Android 9.0 Pie.  Starting at $569 (about £440 or AU$800), the phone will also come with 128GB of storage that can be expanded to 256GB by adding a microSD card, according to the listing.  OnePlus 7 has a ‘faster’ screen. Will you care? Now playing: Watch this: Comment The company’s next flagship is expected this spring, possibly as early as May 14. The Verge suggests that although the OnePlus 7 Pro will support 5G, the company is downplaying it, given the near-term limits of the next generation network.  Previously, OnePlus had said that it would be among the first to have 5G in a phone — but that the device would not come to the US. The company did not immediately respond to a request to comment. Read more: Everything we know so far about the OnePlus 7 Shenzhen-based OnePlus originally captured a following by making phones with many of the premium features found on Apple and Samsung’s premium phones and selling them for hundreds less. Since then, it’s tweaked that strategy: OnePlus now has one of the highest increases in cost from model to model. Excited to share the next product from OnePlus will unleash a new era of Fast and Smooth. Especially Smooth! Smooth is more challenging than Fast – a true test of hardware and software.The new product is just beautiful – I can’t wait for you to see it! 😬✨ pic.twitter.com/yPU9sEbeIv— Pete Lau (@petelau2007) April 17, 2019 Phones 1 OnePlus Tags A purported photo of the OnePlus 7 showing a pop-up camera. Giztop Editors’ Note, May 14, 2019: CNET’s OnePlus 7 Pro review is here. Read more about the new phone from OnePlus.   OnePlus is reportedly planning to introduce a new premium phone in 2019 that supports 5G and features new display technology. Called the OnePlus 7 Pro, the phone will have a display that’s “super smooth and very crisp,” OnePlus CEO Pete Lau told The Verge. The report speculates that the display may support a 90Hz refresh rate that’s about 33 percent faster than most other smartphones. The faster refresh rate may have been foreshadowed by Lau in a tweet from last week: 1:38last_img read more

Gmail confidential mode for G Suite launching in June

first_img Post a comment Share your voice Tags The new Gmail mode lets you restrict access to confidential emails. Derek Poore/CNET  Gmail’s confidential mode will be launching in G Suite on June 25, Google announced in a blog post Wednesday.The mode will be on by default in Google’s suite of tools for business, and allows workers to set expiration dates and revoke access to emails. Users can also require recipients to go through text message authentication before being allowed to view an email.”Additionally, with confidential mode, recipients don’t have the option to forward, copy, print, or download their content or attachments,” the blog post, spotted by VentureBeat, said.It’s already available in beta mode — you can see generally how to use it in the GIF below. Google, Inc. Announced in August, confidential mode was rolled out first to personal Gmail iOS and Android apps. While the mode prevents recipients from forwarding, copying, printing or downloading confidential emails, they can still take screenshots. 0 Use the Gmail app to send confidential emailscenter_img Mobile Tech Industry Security Applications Mobile Apps Digital Media Gmail Google 2:22 Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

The CV is dead and Artificial Intelligence can help companies candidates Shortlist

first_img Close Are you looking to apply for jobs or finding it difficult to hire the right talent for your organization? Shortlist is a start-up that’s keen on solving the biggest pain points of hiring employees.In our latest BizTalk, Danish Manzoor, Executive Editor, International Business Times, India, speaks with Paul Breloff, CEO and co-founder of Shortlist, a Mumbai- and California-based employment-tech start-up, about the hurdles of the hiring process and how his company aims to address them with a simplified and automated process.Shortlist is a platform that is aimed at offering a better approach at hiring – shifting from the traditional paradigm of handing out CVs to a robust and effective way of identifying the right talent for the right job using artificial intelligence. With operations in India and South Africa, Shortlist has been working with numerous clients since 2016 by automating applicant vetting process using online assessments. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:02/21:29Loaded: 0%00:02Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-21:27?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Is AI the future of Recruiting? As Breloff said in his interview, Shortlist wants to be a “noise filtration layer” between recruiters and applicants. The start-up uses predictive chat-based interviews and online competency-based assessments to thoroughly screen candidates before pushing them forward.Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the core of Shortlist, which qualifies candidates based on location, salary, and experience, in turn saving time by eliminating the basic Q&As. The company also firmly believes in not judging a fish by its ability to climb a tree, hence it uses customized competency-based assessments and analyses several data points on each candidate’s ability, motivation, and fit.During the BizTalk, Breloff spoke about the how Shortlist came into being, right from getting the brand’s name suggestion from a Kenyan client, to using the latest technology tools like AI and machine learning to solve the most time-consuming phases of hiring, and raising funds as well as plans of acquisitions in the near-future.Shortlist was co-founded by Breloff along with two of his best friends Simon Desjardins and Matt Schnuck, who are also on board as Chief Customer Officer and Chairman, respectively. The start-up currently operates in India and East Africa and has over 80 clients, including ITC, DHL, dunes, and others.[CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE FULL VIDEO]last_img read more

Kutubdia biodiversity in danger

first_imgHere was the embankment that had saved Kutubdia from different cyclonic stroms over the years. Photo: Jewel SheelBoth local and foreign investors are keen to set up industries in Kutubdia island while the government also has similar plans. However, environmentalists warn unplanned growth of industries may destroy the environment and biodiversity of the island.Coastal islands like Maheskhali, Kutubdia, Sonadia and St Martin’s are sanctuaries for amphibians and aquatic animals. There are four to five species of dolphins and two species of tortoise that are on the verge of extinction.Director general of the Department of Environment (DoE), AKM Rafique Ahammed, told Prothom Alo, “Those who want to set up industries in the island have to get an approval. If any of the industries poses a risk to the environment, it has to carry out Environment Impact Assessment (EIA).”According to Petrobangla, local company Beximco has sought 700 acres of land to the power, energy and mineral resources ministry. Beximco in its website said the island would be its centre of investment for the energy sector.Bangladesh Economic Zone Authority (BEZA) also wants to establish an economic zone in the island.Two Indian companies dealing with Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) have shown their interest to set up terminals in Kutubdia as well, as did another Indonesian company.Petrobangla officials said investors in the energy sector are also showing interest in Kutubdia.The government is constructing a sea port at Matharbari. Once it is done, large vessels carrying heavy machinery will be able to berth at the Matarbari seaport and it would be a suitable place to establish an LNG terminal. Kutubdia is four kilometers away from Matarbari. This will facilitate bringing in raw materials and LNG containers.Kutubdia upazila chairman Faridul Islam Chowdhury said there is no electricity in the area and most of the embankments are damaged. After the cyclonic storm in 1991, many people left Kutubdia. Some are still leaving, too.He said the prime minister had pledged that electricity will be available by 2020.Local people get employment opportunities if industries are set up, he further said, arguing that they will not leave.Shahera Begum lives in a hut near Kutubdia island. While talking to this correspondent on 27 December 2018, she had said her house would be protected due to the embankment despite the fury of the sea.After the cyclonic storm Fani had hit the island on 4 May, a fisherman of the island said a portion of the embankment was engulfed by the sea. However, Shahera’s cottage survived. But it is now at risk of erosion.A big portion of Kutubdia island was engulfed by the Bay of Bengal and the embankments were damaged by the storms one after another. The residents of the island are leaving their ancestral houses, crop fields and fish enclosures. Where they are settling anew, they are naming the place ‘Kutubdiapara’.According to the local administration, these people are settling at Cox’s Bazar Sadar, Maheskhali, Ramu, Chakaria, Dulahazara and Kekua, Khagrachhari, Bandarban, Rangamati Sadar and Chattogram Sadar and Anwara upazila.The lighthouse which had been giving light to sailors since 1848 it broke down during the cyclone of 1991. The administration did not take any steps to this end. People have now started living in the area named ‘Lighthousepara’.Life and riskOne has to go to Kutubdia from Magnama Ghat of Pekua Upazila of Cox’s Bazar by trawler. There is a small bazaar one kilometre away from the ghat. Fish and salt are sold in the market here. One can see the towers of windmills few kilometres later.There is no boundary around the power plants set up on nearly eight acres of land. The security system is not up to the standard while electricity supply is not more than one megawatt. A total of 350 families receive electricity for seven to eight hours a day. There is also a solar and a diesel-powered power station. Only 12 per cent of the islanders get electricity.There have been bumper production of both salt and rice this year. More than 700 tonnes of salt were produced in about 7,000 acres of land. The farmers are, however, worried for its low price. Again, the paddy invented for salty lands by the scientists had a good yield. But the rice prices are also low.Four researchers from two US universities published a research report on geographical changes in Kutubdia in 2017. The study says the size of the island was 77 square kilometres in 1972, but it shrunk to 68 square kilometres in 2013.Meanwhile, a study carried out by the Center for Environmental and Geographic Information Services (CEGIS), a government agency, says the total area of Kutubdia island was about 100 square kilometres in 1840. As many as 40 square kilometres of the lands were reduced due to erosion. Upazila administration data also give similar impression.Rezaul Karim Chowdhury, executive director of Coast Trust, an organisation working on coastal development, said due to erosion and lack of damns the island and the residents’ lives are at stake.”Scattered plans will not help to protect this island. We need an inclusive plan. The problem will increase if the residents are displaced,” he added.As per the upazila administration data, there was a 40-kilometre embankment around the island. Half of the damn collapsed in the 1991 cyclone. It was reduced to eight kilometres by the onslaught of the cyclone Sidr, Aila, Roanu, Mahasen and the latest Fani. As a result, a large part of the island goes under water in regular tide.Upazila Nirbahi Officer (UNO) Dipak Kumar Roy said he has requested the Water Development Board to repair the damn as soon as possible.The water level of the sea is very high at the moment. It should be kept in mind while repairing the embankments, he added.Secretary to the Ministry of Water Resources, Kabir Bin Anwar, said the ministry had decided to repair and rebuild the damns.Also, mangrove forests will be created to protect the coast as the Ministry of Forest and Environment and the directorate will remain responsible to protect the biodiversity of the island.According to Kutubdia upazila administration, every year there is erosion in different places of the island in normal tide. Two years ago the island’s population was about 300,000. It is less than half now.Another 5,000 people have been left vulnerable due to cyclone Fani, he added.Ishtiaq Uddin Ahmed, former country director for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), stressed the need for rehabilitating the residents of the island.”Local residents must be protected before any project is implemented there and erosion must be stopped, too,” he said.”Otherwise, being one of the vital source of salt and fishes, the island, its inhabitants and the proposed investment will be in danger,” he observed.”Coastal islands like Kutubdia protect the country from the initial strike of storm surge. Before upgrading it to an industrial area, it’s overall wellbeing has to be kept in mind,” Inshtiaq further said.*This report, originally published in Prothom Alo’s print edition, has been rewritten in English by Rabiul Islam and Farjana Liakat.last_img read more

Maker of OxyContin Reaches 270M Settlement in Oklahoma

first_imgBy KEN MILLER and GEOFF MULVIHILL Associated PressOKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The maker of OxyContin and the family that owns the company have reached a $270 million settlement with the state of Oklahoma over the prescription painkiller’s role in the nation’s deadly opioid crisis, a person familiar with the agreement said Tuesday.The person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Oklahoma’s attorney general scheduled an afternoon news conference to announce the settlement with Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue Pharma and its controlling Sackler family.This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Oklahoma’s attorney general will announce a settlement Tuesday, March 26, 2019, with Purdue Pharma, one of the drug manufacturers named in a state lawsuit that accuses them of fueling the opioid epidemic. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)Nearly $200 million will go toward establishing the National Center for Addiction Studies and Treatment at Oklahoma State University in Tulsa, while local governments will get $12.5 million, the person said.The deal comes two months before Oklahoma’s lawsuit against Purdue Pharma and other drug companies was set to become the first one in the current coast-to-coast wave of litigation against the industry to go to trial. This is the first settlement to come out of the barrage of lawsuits.Plaintiffs’ attorney Paul Hanly, who is not involved in the Oklahoma case but is representing scores of other governments, welcomed the deal, saying: “That suggests that Purdue is serious about trying to deal with the problem. Hopefully, this is the first of many.”But some activists were furious, saying they were denied the chance to hold Purdue Pharma fully accountable in public, in front of a jury.“This decision is a kick in the gut to our community,” said Ryan Hampton, who is recovering from opioid addiction. “We deserve to have our day in court with Purdue. The parents, the families, the survivors deserve at least that. And Oklahoma stripped that from us today.”He added: “We cannot allow Purdue to cut backroom deals with state attorneys general.”An attorney for Purdue Pharma did not immediately return a call seeking comment.Opioids, including heroin and prescription drugs like OxyContin, were a factor in a record 48,000 deaths across the U.S. in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Oklahoma recorded about 400 opioid deaths that year. State officials have said that since 2009, more Oklahomans have died from opioids than in vehicle crashes.Purdue Pharma introduced OxyContin in the 1990s and marketed it aggressively to doctors. It has made tens of billions of dollars from the drug but has been hit with close to 2,000 lawsuits from state and local governments trying to hold the company responsible for the scourge of addiction. Those lawsuits now threaten to push Purdue Pharma into bankruptcy.The lawsuits accuse the company of downplaying the addiction risks and pushing doctors to increase dosages even as the dangers became known. According to a court filing, Richard Sackler, then senior vice president responsible for sales, proudly told the audience at a launch party for OxyContin in 1996 that it would create a “blizzard of prescriptions that will bury the competition.”Purdue Pharma has settled other lawsuits over the years, and three executives pleaded guilty to criminal charges in 2007. But this is the first settlement to come out of the surge of litigation that focuses largely on the company’s more recent conduct.The agreement was announced after the Oklahoma Supreme Court on Monday denied a request from drugmakers to postpone the start of the state’s trial in May. The remaining defendants in Oklahoma’s 2017 lawsuit still face trial.Lance Lang, a 36-year-old recovering user from Oklahoma City, said he is glad some of the settlement will go toward helping those still suffering from addiction.“My heart breaks for those that we’ve already lost. I’ve buried several myself,” said Lang, who now helps recovering users find housing. “But I also know we have waiting lists of dozens and dozens for our facilities, and the state has waiting lists of hundreds and hundreds of people who need help right now.”But Cheryl Juaire, whose 23-year-old son Corey died of an overdose in 2011, said she was devastated to hear about the settlement. She had been organizing a group of hundreds of mothers to go to the first day of the trial and stand outside with photos of their dead children.Jauire, who lives in Marlborough, Massachusetts, said a complete airing of the facts is the only way to fully hold Purdue to account.“They can’t settle,” she said. “That would be a huge disservice to the tens of thousands of families here in the United States who buried a child. That’s blood money from our children.”The Sackler family is responsible for $75 million of the $270 million settlement, according to the person familiar with the agreement.As the accusations have mounted, the Sacklers have faced personal lawsuits and growing public pressure. A Massachusetts court filing made public earlier this year found that family members were paid at least $4 billion from 2007 until last year.The Sacklers are major philanthropists, and the family name is emblazoned on the walls at many of the world’s great museums and universities. But in the past few weeks, the Tate museums in London and the Guggenheim Museum in New York have cut ties with the family, and other institutions have come under pressure to turn down donations or remove the Sackler name.This month, Purdue Pharma officials acknowledged that are considering filing for bankruptcy because of the crush of lawsuits.More than 1,400 federal lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies have been consolidated in front of a single judge in Cleveland who is pushing the drugmakers and distributors to reach a nationwide settlement with state and local governments.___Mulvihill reported from Cherry Hill, New Jersey. Associated Press reporter Jill Bleed in Little Rock, Arkansas, contributed to this report.last_img read more