Black athletes have long history of not sticking to sports

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Carlos said Mexico City was the only place he could’ve made such a statement.“At that time, for me, there was no other vehicle than the Olympic Games,” he recalled. “I felt like the humanitarian issues at that time, as well as the humanitarian issues of today, are more compelling to me than an Olympic medal. I love the Olympics and I love sports, but I love a just cause for humanity even greater.”It is a sentiment shared by NFL players.The killing of mostly unarmed black men by mostly white police officers sparked the Black Lives Matter movement, which has again drawn black athletes into the national conversation on race . The sideline protests in the NFL — started in August 2016 by Kaepernick — have been the most prominent display of players’ engagement, though black athletes in baseball and basketball have also had smaller displays of activism.Because sports are such a prominent aspect of American life, they remain an effective way to bring attention to issues of racial injustice.“This is our inheritance,” said Howard Bryant, senior writer at ESPN and author of the forthcoming book “The Heritage: Black Athletes, A Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism.”“You’re not allowed to check out,” Bryant said. “This is going to continue until the United States respects the black brain more than the black body. Then sports can go back to what it was supposed to be — just a game.”Media — and social media in particular — has helped in recruiting athletes to the cause, explained Color of Change Executive Director Rashad Robinson, whose online civil rights organization has joined with athletes in addressing systemic racism and mobilized its membership to boycott the NFL and its corporate sponsors.Such stands have often come at a cost, even for today’s players, who are far more prominent and wealthy than their predecessors. Like players who spoke out before them, they have been met with violence and vitriol, described as unpatriotic, ungrateful and disrespectful.“The public is used to black guys selling sneakers and making jump shots,” said Bryant. “Do white people want to hear what black people have to say? No, they don’t. Does it need to be said? Yes.” AFP official booed out of forum “The whole purpose of the demonstrations is to get (fans’) attention,” Kareem Abdul-Jabbar said in an interview with The Associated Press. “These are the people that ignore the fact that people are being shot dead in the street. They’ve found ways to ignore it.”For weeks, some NFL players, most of them African-American, knelt silently on the sidelines as the national anthem played before kickoff. Their goal: to raise awareness about disparities in policing in communities of color, and about persistent, systemic racism in America.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt was a new approach to an age-old problem.“It’s because of what happens to him that others know they have to toe the line,” said New York University historian Jeffrey Sammons. “They can’t be seen as defiant or opponents of the system . They know they can’t succeed without living up to expectations and being humble, unassuming and supportive of the established order.” Then came along Muhammad Ali, who was not one to toe the line.Ali was the most visible and influential athlete of his generation when he protested the Vietnam War as racially unjust by refusing to be drafted in 1967, a move that cost him his livelihood, derailing his fighting career for years.Ali’s actions influenced others. Basketball player Abdul-Jabbar boycotted the 1968 Summer Olympics. At the same games, held in Mexico City, American track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos held raised fists covered in black leather gloves as the national anthem played after winning gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race.Abdul-Jabbar, who at 70 represents a bridge between Ali and Kaepernick, went on to a storied NBA career, but Smith and Carlos returned home to the threat of having their medals taken, and faced difficulty finding coaching jobs.“It was an international stage that was being used to promote how unified and wonderful the world is, but black Americans at that point were still in a very tough struggle to obtain their rights, both human and political,” Abdul-Jabbar said of the 1968 games. “The fact that (Smith and Carlos) used an international platform to speak for people who usually don’t have any power to be heard made it all the more significant.”ADVERTISEMENT Mayweather drops another hint at MMA fight Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games PLAY LIST 01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LATEST STORIES MOST READ NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerscenter_img Read Next Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Abdul-Jabbar agreed, tying Ali’s fate to Kaepernick’s as two athletes who sacrificed their livelihoods at the height of their careers for a greater cause.“Anybody that knows anything about football will tell you that he is a talented athlete and should be on somebody’s team,” Abdul-Jabbar, author of “Becoming Kareem: Growing Up On and Off the Court,” said of Kaepernick. “I think he’s being blackballed.”But with the cost are also benefits. Using the universal language of sports as a platform to discuss race reveals racism and galvanizes support to end it, Robinson said.“Part of why people are paying attention is because of exactly who they are,” he said. “Throughout time, it has been the people with reputations and something to lose whose risk-taking has helped result in change.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding FILE – In this Feb. 25, 1966 file photo, While Illinois Athletic Commission listened, heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali speaks, in Chicago. Ali had criticized his imminent army draft. (AP Photo/File)This year’s NFL season featured two of America’s pastimes: football and race, with pre-game protests dividing fans along color lines and making Sunday afternoons among the most segregated hours in the country.While some fans would prefer players stick to sports, many black athletes have chosen a different path by protesting, making people uncomfortable.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoiseslast_img read more

Wankhede yet to get a nod from fire department

first_imgThe new-look Wankhede Stadium was formally inaugurated in Mumbai on Sunday. However, it is still uncertain whether or not the stadium will be allowed to host World Cup matches.The venue is yet to receive a No Objection Certificate (NOC) from the fire department with the chief fire officer saying they will not issue the NOC unless they are fully satisfied.The stadium recently failed a fire inspection, raising concerns that it may not be ready in time for the World Cup matches.One of the main concerns raised by the fire department was the lack of access to fire brigades to all parts of the stadium. Wankhede Stadium is scheduled to host three World Cup matches including the final on April 2.ICC president and Mumbai Cricket Association chief Sharad Pawar, who formally inaugurated the stadium, refused to comment on the issue.last_img read more

India vs Australia: Usman Khawaja says adaptability key in T20I series

first_imgAustralian top-order batsman Usman Khawaja believes that adaptability is going to be the key against India in their upcoming two-match T20I series, beginning February 24.The 32-year-old, an experienced hand in playing on the Indian wickets as he has been previously part of the Indian Premier League (IPL), said that pitches in India are “pretty good” for batting.He further asserted that many Australian players have got the experience of playing on the Indian tracks which will prove to be beneficial for them.”I found there was probably one wicket that spun a fair bit in Dharamsala, the other ones (in Mohali (twice) and Bangalore) were pretty good batting surfaces. You just have to adapt to whatever you get here,” Cricket.com.au quoted Khawaja, as saying.”As the Australian Cricket Team, a lot of guys have had some really good performances in India in the past, so I think we can draw from that,” he added.The left-hand batsman, who is one of the front-runners to get the opener’s slot in the T20I series, is confident of Australia’s good performance against India. “It’s good to have options. A lot of guys that are in this team are quite flexible on where they can play so whatever happens, moving forward I think everyone will do quite well in whatever role they have,” cricket.com.au quoted Khawaja, as saying.India and Australia will play their first T20I on February 24 at Visakhapatnam followed by the second match on February 27 in Bengaluru.advertisementAlso Read | Hardik Pandya ruled out of Australia series due to back injuryAlso Read | India can try and throw Pakistan out of World Cup but it won’t happen: Sunil GavaskarAlso See:last_img read more

Premier calls for more security and encourages OTs to link hands to

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:bermuda, dr. rufus ewing, premier, territories leaders TCI Premier Responds To Beaches’ Letter Announcing Closure Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 24 Jul 2015 – The Premier has told the UK that the areas of biggest concern for the Turks and Caicos as an overseas territory are: financial and economic sustainability, social development and border control and security. Hon Dr Rufus Ewing and Border Control and Labour Minister DonHue Gardiner on Wednesday left to attend the Pre-Joint Ministerial Council meeting set in Bermuda. The Office of the Premier provided the presentation by Premier Ewing at the two day session; he spoke of the common challenges and how they can be an impetus for getting what is most needed per nation from the British.“By and large there are number of areas that are common that we can say that as Overseas Territories we can sit with our heads together and solve. Also on the issue of cooperation between countries, best practices between countries, there are some countries that are more advanced and have gone through with some countries that have yet to go through and so that there is a lot that we can learn from Bermuda, a lot that we can learn from Cayman Islands who might have gone through this before and developed systems that we can benefit from so it is about that kind of relationship as sister overseas territories.”During the two-day meeting, the Territories Leaders are also expected to make a unified statement on their approach to Beneficial Ownership, which will be forwarded to the United Kingdom. Bermuda swears in youngest Premier in country’s history Attorney calls on UWI to honor TCI leaders Recommended for youlast_img read more

Bhabadah people seek remedy from waterlogging

first_imgPeople of a community movement that want solution to waterlogging in Jashore’s Bhabadah area on Tuesday urged the authorities concerned to implement the tidal river management (TRM) immediately to save several thousand people of Bhabadah from stagnant waters, reports UNB.The Bhabadah affected areas are – Abhaynagar, Momirampur, Keshabpur and Jashore sadar upazila in Jashore and Phultala and Dumuria in Khulna and Tala upazila in Satkhira districts.The leaders of the community at a press conference at its office in Jashore town said at least 1 million people of 200 villages were directly affected by the water stagnation problem.Ranjit Bawali, convener of the Bhabadah’s water problem mitigation committee, read out the written statement at the conference where Iqbal Kabir Jahid, polit bureau member of Workers Party of Bangladesh, Baikuntha Bihari Roy, Gazi Ahdul Hamid, Abdul Majid Gazi, Chaitanya Kumar Paul and other leaders of the committee were present.The committee announced to hold protest rally between 25 July and 20 August to press home their demand.last_img read more

Trump says very popular spokeswoman Sanders to leave

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 8 May White House press secretary Sarah Sanders speaks to the press in the driveway of the White House in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPUS president Donald Trump on Thursday announced the surprise departure of his spokeswoman Sarah Sanders, after a combative tenure that saw her all-but-kill off traditional White House briefings to journalists.Sanders has been one of Trump’s most loyal foot soldiers, almost constantly at his side during his tumultuous two and a half years at the White House and during the campaign before.Trump announced her exit in a tweet and did not name a replacement.”After 3 1/2 years, our wonderful Sarah Huckabee Sanders will be leaving the White House at the end of the month and going home to the Great State of Arkansas,” Trump said, adding that he hoped she would run for governor of her state.Sharp, sometimes acid-tongued, Sanders has not been prone to the almost comic slip-ups that embarrassed predecessors in the job, such as short-lived Trump spokesman Anthony Scaramucci.But she has earned a reputation for bruising clashes with journalists whom she finds over-critical — often echoing her boss’s attacks on unfavorable coverage as “Fake News.”At a White House event Thursday on reintegration into society for ex-prisoners, Trump interrupted proceedings to summon the “warrior” Sanders from the audience and lavish praise on her record.Calling her “a friend, a woman, a great, great magnificent person,” Trump said, “she’s very popular.”In fact, Sanders, 36, has a sometimes bitter relationship with the White House press corps and is seen as responsible for the demise of the formal daily briefing — practically an institution under previous presidents.Pressed during one particularly combative briefing to distance herself from Trump’s characterization of the media as the “enemy of the people,” Sanders refused.The last time she took to the podium for a back-and-forth with reporters in the White House briefing room was 11 March. Instead, she communicates largely through interviews on the president’s favorite TV network Fox News and short, informal briefings with other journalists outdoors.She has also been accused of telling repeated lies to reporters, although she denies this.Despite Sanders’ damaged reputation in media circles, there had been no hint from the administration that her exit was imminent.Sanders’ father Mike Huckabee is a former Republican governor of Arkansas, making her something of a member of conservative royalty.No tearsCalled up to the microphone by Trump at the ex-prisoners’ event, a visibly emotional Sanders said she would “try not to get emotional, because I know crying can make us look weak.”In a brief address, the spokeswoman praised Trump and her colleagues at the White House, saying she “loved every minute” of the job.”I’m going to continue to be one of the most outspoken and loyal supporters of the president and his agenda and I know he’s going to have an incredible six more years and get a lot more done,” she said.She made no mention of the media or the role of journalists at the White House.Although Sanders is often blamed for the White House’s killing off of the press briefing, she has been serving a president who from the start decided to tear up the media playbook.With Trump communicating directly via Twitter and other social media to tens of millions of people every day, the traditional role of a press office putting out statements has become partly redundant.And while journalists now rarely hold the administration’s feet to the fire in the calm, organized setting of the briefing room, they have extraordinary access to Trump himself.Weekly, the president holds his own impromptu briefings in the Oval Office or out on the South Lawn before boarding his Marine One helicopter. In contrast to real press conferences, these occasions can be chaotic and are rarely carried on live television.Sanders may not speak much, but she is always there — in the background.last_img read more