No sex for sale, Court rules

first_img10 October 2002The Constitutional Court has ruled that prostitution and running brothels are still illegal. The ruling, made on Wednesday, dashed the hopes of brothel owner Ellen Jordan, who spent millions of rands in her court bids to get the laws thrown out.When Jordan, one of her employees and a sex worker were arrested for contravening the Sexual Offences Act of 1957 in 1996, Jordan took the case to the High Court. The High Court found firstly that sections of the law that render sex for money a crime were unconstitutional, and secondly that the legislation outlawing the managing of brothels should be upheld.Jordan took the rulings to the Constitutional Court to have the first one confirmed and the second overturned.However, the Constitutional Court upheld both rulings, the first outlawing prostitution, the second outlawing and brothel-keeping. The Court found that outlawing prostitution did not infringe on the rights to human dignity and economic activity.Judges in the Court were however divided over whether the ban on prostitution amounts to gender discrimination or not.Sexual double standardsOne judge, Sandile Ngcobo, arguing the majority position, said that the ban did not discriminate against women in particular, since both male and female prostitution is illegal.However, judges Kate O’Regan and Albie Sachs argued that by making the prostitute the main offender and the client the accomplice, the law “reinforces sexual double standards and perpetuates gender stereotypes in a manner impermissible in a society committed to advancing gender equality’, according to a Constitutional Court summary of the judgement.There were mixed reactions to the judgement, with some arguing that the ruling would consolidate efforts to close down brothels, and others maintaining that the ruling would not curb prostitution but would simply send it further underground, rendering any attempts to regulate the industry and improve the health and safety of sex workers more difficult.According to the Star newspaper, National Director of Public Prosecutions Bulelani Ngcuka was pleased with the judgement and warned brothels to “Close down, or we will do it for you’.Spread of HIV/AidsDoctors for Life International, called by the state as a witness, argued that prostitution “encouraged international trafficking in women, led to child prostitution, intensified the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, especially HIV/Aids, and was often accompanied by a high degree of drug abuse’, The Star reported.However, some have cautioned that the ruling will send the industry even further underground, without curbing it at all. The director of the Reproductive Health Research Unit, Helen Rees, said that the ruling would make it difficult to help protect sex workers against risks like HIV/Aids. “How to you access (sex workers) when you criminalise them?’ she asked.The Commission on Gender Equality also expressed disappointment over the judgement.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

Proposed tariffs could have a huge impact on Ohio’s corn and soybean producers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Another round of talks in the ongoing trade war with China has led to another set of concerns for agriculture due to the potentially huge ramifications for the nation’s exports and commodity process.Ohio’s crop producers are holding out hope that, in the end, things will work out for the good of U.S. trade, but the stakes are very high for Ohio’s top agricultural crops. The political rhetoric and potential for massive demand impacts for corn, soybeans and wheat change by the hour on this ongoing one-upping of tariff roulette. At press time, U.S. Customs and Border Protection was set to begin collecting additional duties on designated Chinese goods July 6.“We should address our trade challenges by increasing our competitiveness, not creating new barriers,” said Allen Armstrong, Ohio Soybean Association president and Clark County soybean farmer. “Exports have been one of the few bright spots for farmers in recent years, and we can’t afford another hit to the bottom line.”The Ohio Soybean Association denounced the White House’s decision to impose a 25% tariff on $50 billion in Chinese products, which China has said it will answer with a retaliatory 25% tariff on imported U.S. soybeans, corn and over 100 other American products. China purchases 61% of total U.S. soybean exports and more than 30% of overall U.S. soybean production.“The collateral damage in this trade war will include not only Ohio grain farmers, but all Ohioans,” said Scott Metzger, OSA first vice president and Ross County soybean farmer. “Farm incomes are at multiyear lows, and this action will harm our state’s largest industry by undermining our top agricultural export.”Across Ohio, the loss of soybean exports to China would be an estimated $241 million annually, according to research from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). According to the Ohio Development Services Agency, Ohio’s $1.8 billion in soybean exports in 2017 accounted for more than 3.5% of all Ohio commodity exports. Ohio is the sixth largest producer of soybeans in the U.S., with 4.8 million acres planted in 2017 and more than 60% of the state’s entire soybean production exported to international markets. China imported $13.9 billion in U.S. soybeans in 2017, 61% of total U.S. soy exports.When combined with losses from corn prices, Ohio State University researchers have projected a 59% loss in annual net farm income based on historical trends in yields on corn and soybeans and projections for price drops in both commodities due to the tariffs.For the study, the researchers compiled data from six Ohio corn and soybean farms of similar size and created a representative Ohio farm comprised of 1,100 acres split evenly between corn and soybeans. They used the representative farm to determine the financial toll a tariff could take on an Ohio farm.Net annual income on that representative Ohio farm was projected to drop from $63,577 to $26,107 under the proposed tariff, according to the study performed by Ben Brown, manager of CFAES’s farm management program and Ian Sheldon an agricultural economist, who serves as the Andersons Chair in Agricultural Marketing, Trade and Policy in CFAES.“There are farmers who are struggling across the state,” Brown said. “If the proposed tariffs go into effect, we’re going to have farmers who will have to exit the industry.”The financial losses stem from an expected drop in Chinese demand for U.S. soybeans and corn and in the world price for both crops.“The biggest impact will be on profits from soybeans, however corn is affected too,” Brown said.Other international trading partners, including Canada, the European Union, and Mexico have recently announced retaliatory tariffs in response to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum imports as well, that could also dip into the profits of Ohio farmers.The losses from soybeans sales are projected to be far greater than for corn. Every year, 31% of the soybeans and 2% of the corn Ohio produces are exported to China.China is the largest buyer of soybeans in the world, and Brazil is its top supplier with the United States being second. If China imposes the threatened 25% tariff on U.S. soybeans that will drive up the price that Chinese companies have to pay for U.S. soybeans and encourage them to buy even more soybeans from Brazil, Brown said.“The U.S. remains the largest producers of soybeans, but it is safe to say that Brazil could become the number one producer of soybeans in the world with increased demand for their products,” said Brown, who along with Sheldon are in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics within CFAES.The United States may not be able to regain its share in selling soybeans to China, Sheldon said.He pointed to how the United States lost market share for its beef beginning in 2003 following Japan’s ban on imports of U.S. beef due to cases of mad cow disease in the United States. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Australia was able to increase its exports of beef to Japan, and the United States has not regained its share in that market, Sheldon said.“Why lose market share when you’re competing as well as you can,” Sheldon said of U.S. exports of soybeans and the prospect of a trade war with China. “It doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me.”last_img read more

Premium Members: Get a Sneak Peek at the New Advanced Search

first_imgGeocaching Premium members are the rockstars of geocaching. Without you, we wouldn’t be here. So right now, you can help fuel the future of geocaching. One of the upcoming features is something that has been asked for by the geocaching community: a new and improved Advanced Search. It’s been completely retooled, revamped and streamlined based on geocaching community feedback. Now you’ll be able to find the exact adventure you want, easier.Make sure you’re subscribed to the Geocaching Tips and Tricks emails to receive your invite to test this new tool. If you’re not sure, visit your Email Preferences and make sure the box next to “Tips and Tricks” is checked. The Geocaching Premium member sneak peek invite email is scheduled to be sent to you on or before this Thursday, January 29.(Hier kannst Du den Artikel auf Deutsch lesen)Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedChanges to the Geocaching HQ NewsletterMay 29, 2018In “News”Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter – July 13, 2011July 13, 2011In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”3 Tips for New Geocachers – Geocaching.com Weekly NewsletterSeptember 12, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”last_img read more

More Details on AT&T’s “Network Glitch” that Caused Compromised Facebook Security

first_imgsarah perez Tags:#Facebook#mobile#NYT#social networks#web Related Posts On Saturday, an exclusive AP report told a story of an AT&T network glitch which allowed some mobile users the ability to login to other people’s Facebook accounts. Although according to the story only a handful of people were affected by this glitch, the security flaw could have “far reaching implications for everyone on the Internet,” wrote the reporter.After reviewing the details of the incident, the “glitch” appears to be more of an issue with some misconfigured software at AT&T and less of an internet-wide security concern, as previously feared. That being said, the wireless company regarded the incident seriously and has taken measures to prevent similar issues from reoccurring in the future. Users Logged into Wrong Facebook AccountsIn the AP story, a mother and her two daughters, all of whom are AT&T subscribers, logged into the social networking site Facebook using their mobile phones and found themselves with full access to strangers’ Facebook accounts. This was apparently caused by a routing error on AT&T’s part notes the article. In this modern-day equivalent of “crossed wires,” it seemed the wireless company had lost track of which users were which and had sent back the incorrect web pages to the users’ phones. It turns out that the women were not alone in experiencing these issues – other AT&T customers were affected as well. However, AT&T won’t say how many, only that the problem occurred in “a limited number of instances.”  Over on the technology news website Slashdot, many speculated about the cause of incident, questioning whether it was a corrupted caching proxy at AT&T or a bug in the HTTP headers set by Facebook that instruct how a response should be cached, among other things. In other words, some weren’t taking it at face value that the problem was entirely AT&T’s fault, despite the fact that an AT&T spokesman claimed that the “network problem behind those episodes” was being fixed. Server Software Error to BlameA recent statement from AT&T now reveals a few more details about the problem and what they’re doing to address it. According to Michael Coe, the same AT&T spokesman cited in the AP article, the issue was caused by a “server software connectivity error” which impacted some wireless customers logging into Facebook using AT&T subscriber information. Facebook users who signed up for the service using their mobile phones are able to login to the site using the phone number and password created during the sign up process, Facebook states in a Q&A on their Help Site. Although Facebook would not comment on the original story, AT&T reports that they did work with the social network in determining the cause of the problem. As it turns out, those affected were logging into Facebook using their AT&T phone numbers as opposed to a username/password combination. Typically, when a username and password is used, a cookie is stored on the mobile device. This small file retains a user’s login credentials, allowing them to access Facebook without having to re-enter their sign in information. When a cookie is not available, the subscriber information is sent to Facebook.com automatically. This is what had taken place in the reported incidents.No More Logins Using Your Phone Number, Says AT&TAT&T reports that they’ve now put additional “security measures” in place to prevent a reoccurrence of this issue but won’t elaborate on what precisely those measures involve. In addition, the wireless company states they are working with Facebook to disable the use of subscriber information as a method for automatic login. That means going forward, AT&T users will no longer be able to use their phone numbers as login credentials to access Facebook from their mobile devices. Only a username and password combination will be allowed. Coe also notes that a similar incident occurred on a customer’s phone in Atlanta, referring to the incident involving the three women. In that case, a misdirected cookie was set on the phone. This is a slightly different issue from what’s described above as it does indeed hint at a routing problem where users are sent the wrong cookie. Although the problem is now resolved, AT&T has still not been able to determine what caused this particular issue. However, the possible routing issue behind this one incident (AT&T could only isolate the problem to one of the three women’s phones) does not appear to be the cause of the other problems. While still somewhat disturbing, especially since the cause is unknown, this singular occurrence does not merit worrying about any “far-reaching,” internet-wide consequences as implied by the original article. A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditcenter_img The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…last_img read more

FD Early Intervention Webinar: Strategies to Support Families Experiencing Difficult Circumstances

first_imgDate:  December 8, 2016Time:  11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ESTLocation: Strategies to Support Families Experiencing Difficult Circumstances“Welcome Home , Mommy!” by The US Army CC BY 2.0 (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brad Mincey/Released)Carol Trivette, Ph.D. earned her degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Child Development and Family Relations.  Her research interests focus on identifying evidence-based practices for working with children and families in the areas of responsive parental interactions with their children with disabilities, family-centered practices and family support, and the development of tools and scales to support the implementation of evidence-based practices with fidelity. She is currently an Associate Professor at East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN.In this session, Dr. Carol Trivette will cap her yearlong webinar series sharing resources and discussing evidence-based practices that providers can implement when they are working with military families in particular, who are facing difficult situations. Participants are encouraged to engage and share challenges, resources, and successes they have experienced working with families of young children with disabilities.  Join us Dec. 8 at 11:00 a.m. EST!The MFLN FD Early Intervention team offers continuing education credits through the Early Intervention Training Program (EITP) at the University of Illinois for each of our webinars, click here to learn more. For more information on future presentations in the 2016 Family Development webinar series, please visit our professional development website or connect with us via social media for announcements: see our Facebook & Twitter.last_img read more

Crucial CWG file goes missing from OC office

first_imgAfter accusing organising committee (OC) chief Suresh Kalmadi and his aide Lalit Bhanot of creating hindrances in the probe, the investigating agencies now claim that some crucial documents which could throw light on the deals related to Commonwealth Games (CWG) have gone missing.Sources told Headlines Today that the contractual obligations and authorisation files related to the Queen’s Baton Relay are not available. They said that Gen Raj Kadiyan was bypassed on arrangements for the relay.The probe agencies fear that the absent documents could have either been destroyed or hidden.The revelation came during a series of searches carried out by a team of 20-30 sleuths at the OC office and its secretary general Lalit Bhanot’s residence in November. In order to get a grip on the investigation process, the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) would approach sports ministry for the removal of Kalmadi and Bhanot.CBI Director A.P. Singh had earlier this month written to Union Cabinet Secretary K.M. Chandrashekar urging the immediate removal of Kalmadi and Bhanot from their posts in the OC.It was earlier reported in September that a crucial file containing information on Mahendroo’s record of service and details of his trips to the UK for the baton relay had gone missing from the OC office.A number of agencies — Central Vigilance Commission (CVC), Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), Enforcement Directorate (ED) and CBI — are on the look out to nail the perpetrators who indulged in irregularities during the mega sporting event held in October 2010.advertisementThe CBI has so far filed three FIRs in connection with the alleged irregularities in CWG and searched the residences of OC director general V.K. Verma and Bhanot on November 30.While one case is related to a Rs 107-crore deal struck with a Swiss score keeping firm, the agency had registered two other FIRs for the contracting of AM Films for the Baton Relay ceremonies by the OC in London.The CBI had arrested OC’s joint director general T.S. Darbari and deputy director general Sanjay Mohindroo for their alleged complicity in these deals.last_img read more

Honda CBR650R bookings begin in India, bike to be priced below Rs 8 lakh

first_imgHonda Motorcycle and Scooter India today commenced the bookings of CBR650R for an amount of Rs 15,000. The upcoming sports middleweight bike will be priced below Rs 8 lakh.CBR650R, which replaces CBR650F, was revealed at the 2018 EICMA Show in Milan. It can be booked at Honda ‘Wing World’ dealerships across 22 cities in India and will be available in two colours – Grand Prix Red and Matte Gunpowder Black Metallic.The new motorcycle will get a 649 cc, liquid cooled, four-cylinder, DOHC, 16-valve engine. CBR650R’s chassis is 6 kilograms lighter than that of CBR650F. The adjustable 41 mm Showa SFF (Separate Function front Fork) offers better suspension response.”Less than two weeks after the national launch of CB300R, Honda is proud to unleash its second global blockbuster in the middle-weight segment under the Silver Wing-mark umbrella,” Yadvinder Singh Guleria, Senior Vice President – Sales and Marketing, Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India, said in a statement.”After the 2019 global fun model line-up unveil in EICMA, Honda has now opened bookings for its new middleweight sports machine CBR650R in India too,” he said.CBR650R gets a slipper clutch for controlled corner manoeuvres. The rear wheel traction is maintained by Honda Selectable Torque Control and it can be switched off if the rider chooses to. There is dual channel ABS accompanied by dual radial-mount calipers at the front and single-piston rear caliper.Inspired by Fireblade Super Sports style, the new motorcycle gets fresh styling with its sharp, aggressive lines, extended side fairings and a super-short rear section. Modern full LED lighting with a narrow dual headlamp and a digital LCD display enhance the bold looks of the bike.advertisementOn February 8, Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India had launched CB300R in India at an introductory price of Rs 2.41 lakh (ex-showroom). The company claimed that in just 25 days since the start of bookings, CB300R had been booked for over three months based on the two-wheeler manufacturer’s current production plan.ALSO READ | Tata Harrier’s automatic variant expected to be launched by mid-2019ALSO READ | 2019 Ford Endeavour revealed ahead of official launch on February 22ALSO READ | Maruti Suzuki Vitara Brezza: Five reasons why the compact SUV is popular among the buyerslast_img read more